Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

News & Politics News & Politics

Teen Pipe-Bomber Allowed on Plane Even AFTER He's Found Out!

Posted by on Jan. 17, 2014 at 9:06 AM
  • 7 Replies

Teen Pipe-Bomber Allowed on Plane Even AFTER He's Found Out

by Rebecca Stokes

flyUp until I had moved out of my parents' house for good after college, when it came to packing for a trip, I could always expect some parental supervision. This isn't because my mom thought I was going to pack anything untoward in my luggage. It's because throughout my teen years, I could barely be depended upon to bathe myself, let alone remember to pack all the socks and underwear required.

That's why this story about 18-year-old Skylar Brown baffles me on a myriad of levels. Brown was trying to board a plane in Canada when officials discovered all the makings of a pipe bomb in his luggage. Did they immediately call the authorities and have the kid arrested? Nope. They did something else -- something borderline insane.

They let him get on the plane and complete his flight! That's right! They put the kid on a plane. Full of other people. Even though for all they knew he had plans to blow everyone sky high. That is beyond terrifying to me. But we can't just blame the officials at the airport. Apparently they have no rights to arrest him in Canada. Instead can we talk about what was going on at home that an 18-year-old could be sauntering to the airport with everything needed to make explosives? That is just crazy.

I will officially never complain about my overly-protective mother again! Nor will I be complaining about any airline that runs a little bit late. It took officials FOUR DAYS to report Brown and bring him up on charges for possession of explosive materials. FOUR DAYS! I shudder to think of all the damage he could have done in that time had the dude been moved to do so. Ultimately he was fined and put on probation -- so at least we know SOMEONE'S keeping an eye on him for now.

Do you think any parent could have stopped Brown from accessing these materials, or was it a lost cause?

by on Jan. 17, 2014 at 9:06 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-7):
JoJoBean8
by Silver Member on Jan. 17, 2014 at 10:11 AM

So bringing pipe bomb material is a ok but you have to dump an opened bottle of water when walking through security. Sounds legit.

JoJoBean8
by Silver Member on Jan. 17, 2014 at 10:12 AM

It's not the parents job to check his luggage. He is 18 years old. Once I hit hs my parents stopped checking my luggage I was responsible enough to pack my things. 

autodidact
by Silver Member on Jan. 17, 2014 at 5:31 PM
1 mom liked this

the TSA are too busy molesting women and terrorizing toddlers to concern themselves with actual threats. 

gludwig2000
by Gina on Jan. 17, 2014 at 5:35 PM

 Unbelievable, and no, this was not his parents responsibility. He was 18 after all, and should have been locked up, not allowed on that plane.

kcangel63
by Amanda on Jan. 17, 2014 at 6:04 PM
1 mom liked this
So he didn't actually have a pipe bomb.
JanuaryBaby06
by on Jan. 17, 2014 at 7:23 PM

So he didn't have a pipe bomb just had all of the fixings to make one? I would have loved to have heard his excuse.

No, it is not his parents job to check his luggage. He is an adult.

29again
by Gold Member on Jan. 18, 2014 at 10:44 PM

I hate when the Stir bloggers leave out pertinent info....  from the link halfway through the blog post:


A pipe bomb in his carry-on bag wasn't enough to get Skylar Murphy, 18, kicked off his international flight from Canada's Edmonton International Airport.  Officers discovered the bomb, as well as black powder, in Murphy's bag in September; though they took the items, they still let him board, CTV reports. It then took four days for Canada’s Air Transport Security Authority to call the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. After Murphy returned to Canada from an undisclosed location, he was arrested and ultimately pleaded guilty to possession of an explosive substance. He hasn't explained what he was doing with the device.

The punishment: A fine of about $100 and a year of probation, as well as a yearlong ban on possessing explosives, firearms, and ammunition. He's also required to donate $500 to the University of Alberta burn unit, CBC reports. "Screening officers do not have the authority to apprehend or detain passengers," a security rep tells CBC. "When they see something potentially illegal, the(y) contact the police." But a security expert tells CTV that "no one wants to take responsibility for what is obviously a series of mistakes."

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN