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News & Politics News & Politics

Indian woman was gang-raped on orders of village court

Posted by on Jan. 24, 2014 at 1:49 AM
  • 14 Replies
KOLKATA, Jan 23 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - A 20-year-old woman in eastern India was gang-raped by 13 men on the orders of a village court as punishment for having a relationship with a man from a different community, a senior police officer said on Thursday.

The woman, who is now recovering in hospital, told police she was assaulted by the men on the night of January 20 in Birbhum district in West Bengal.

Police said that her male companion was tied up in the village square, while the assault on the woman happened in a mud house.

"We arrested all the 13 men, including the village chief who ordered the gang rape. The accused have been produced in court which remanded them to jail custody," Birbhum's Superintendent of Police, C. Sudhakar, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

India toughened laws on sex crimes in March last year following the fatal gang rape of a physiotherapist on a moving bus in Delhi in December 2012. The case led to nationwide protests for better security and has helped sparked national debate about gender inequalities in India.

The issue was highlighted in local media again last week after a 51-year-old Danish tourist was gang-raped in central Delhi by at least five men whom she had asked for directions.

The West Bengal victim's family told media that she was assaulted because the court believed she had violated the rules of her tribe by falling in love with a man from another community.

The couple were ordered to pay a fine of 25,000 rupees ($400), said the victim's mother, adding that the village head then ordered the rape of her daughter.

Human rights groups say diktats issued by kangaroo courts are not uncommon in rural regions.

In northern parts of India, illegal village councils known as "Khap Panchayats" act as de-facto courts settling rural disputes on everything from land and cattle to matrimony and murder.

But such councils are coming under growing scrutiny as their punitive edicts grow more regressive - ranging from banning women from wearing western clothing and using mobile phones to supporting child marriage and sanctioning the lynching of young couples in so-called "honour killings".

The assault comes after a spate of high profile rapes in West Bengal which have brought Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee under fire for not doing enough to stop violence against women.

West Bengal recorded the highest number of gender crimes in the country at 30,942 in 2012 - 12.7 percent of India's total recorded crimes against women. These crimes include rape, kidnapping and sexual harassment and molestation.

Earlier this month, West Bengal's capital, Kolkata, witnessed public protests against police who have been accused of failing to act on the gang rape of a 16-year-old girl who was later murdered.
by on Jan. 24, 2014 at 1:49 AM
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Replies (1-10):
kcangel63
by Amanda on Jan. 24, 2014 at 1:50 AM
Just horrible! >:(
cfcf
by Member on Jan. 24, 2014 at 1:56 AM
What the fuck is going on in India?
kcangel63
by Amanda on Jan. 24, 2014 at 1:58 AM
Bad, horrible stuff.

Quoting cfcf: What the fuck is going on in India?
gludwig2000
by Gina on Jan. 24, 2014 at 7:20 PM

 Wow, thats unbelieveable. When ever I hear a story like this from India, it makes me think of my boss and how they have said that its another world, one like I could never imagine over there. And what puzzles me the most is knowing how much they, and other people from India I have met over the years, knowing how much they value their children. I can not see anyone ordering something like this done, much less a village elder who no doubt has daughters of his own.

kcangel63
by Amanda on Jan. 24, 2014 at 7:24 PM
2 moms liked this
It's not like it was for adultery (not that it would be better), but only for falling in love with an outsider.

I wonder if the men were assigned to her, or if she was just let loose and the men were told to do as they will and those who wanted assaulted her?

I really don't want to know the answer. It makes me sad and sick.


Quoting gludwig2000:

 Wow, thats unbelieveable. When ever I hear a story like this from India, it makes me think of my boss and how they have said that its another world, one like I could never imagine over there. And what puzzles me the most is knowing how much they, and other people from India I have met over the years, knowing how much they value their children. I can not see anyone ordering something like this done, much less a village elder who no doubt has daughters of his own.

JanuaryBaby06
by on Jan. 24, 2014 at 10:42 PM

This is awful! Woman are treated like absolute crap in most third world countries. I could go on a giant rant on what/ who I really blame but I wont... this is not the forum for that-lol.

kerryket
by Member on Jan. 24, 2014 at 11:12 PM
1 mom liked this
This is disturbing as well

West Bengal gangrape: When women defend brutality
According to a report on The Times of India, the women in the village boycotted the media, sparred with the police and even told reporters and authorities that the victim needed to be reprimanded for her for her conduct.

While women worldwide are trying to mitigate sexual violence, there are others who help perpetuate it. Agencies.
by FP Staff 24 Jan 14:20 pm IST
     
As is the tradition with reporting incidents of sexual violence in the mainstream media, one gruesome detail after other of the gangrape of a 20-year-old tribal girl in Birbhum has been steadily tumbling out on newspapers, TV channels and social media. After the village headman was arrested alongside the 13 rape accused, some villagers agreed to talk to reporters, recounting a horrific incident piece by piece where a village stood aside and watched as a 20-year-old got brutalized all night.

A village comprising as many women as men. None of whom, presumably, uttered a single word in protest when the proceedings were ordered and then carried out. While you might want to jump in the defence of these women - any woman in such a set up must be horrified enough to not speak up - there are only as many redeeming qualities about them as the men in the village, who saw no problem in what was happening.

According to a report on The Times of India, the women in the village boycotted the media, sparred with the police and even told reporters and authorities that the victim needed to be reprimanded for her conduct. Many of them even tried to stop the police from arresting the men and fronted a strong protest, declaring that the men were innocent and were being framed.

TOI quotes a woman in the village as saying:

"We know that she lived elsewhere with that mason. She made a lot of money. How can we allow the family back? Nothing happened. She made false allegations against our family members because we opposed her illicit relationship," said Panmuni Tudu, a villager.

While we routinely hold men responsible for atrocities on women, the social narrative doesn't always bring up the issue of the Indian woman's participation in perpetuating the tradition of....
sexual violence against other women. Misogyny, in fact, is as much a disease with women as it is with men in India.

A recent debate, led by CNN IBN deputy editor Sagarika Ghose, televised at Khirkee extension saw women in the neighborhood enthusiastically defending Somnath Bharti's actions. In fact, a lady even ran towards a guest wagging her finger violently, while reiterating the fact that the women who were hauled up were indeed on the wrong side of law.

In another incident, reported by a single mother living in Kolkata, a whole middle class neighbourhood, women included verbally assaulted her and threatened her when she dared to scold a gang of teenage boys for continuously harassing her introverted, shy teenaged son. One of the boys she scolded had even pulled her son's shorts down in public, which led the single mother to intervene. Alongside the men, she said in her account, the women in the neighbour questioned her character, her choice of clothes and branded her a careless, loose woman.

In 2011, a lesbian couple committed suicide in Bengal after they were forcibly separated by the villagers. Most women in the village scathingly criticised the victims, where as the men came up with more diplomatic explanations for having them separated.

Across class, caste and religion, violence against women have been perpetuated and has thrived with support and participation from the women themselves. It is maybe time to make women accountable for the crimes they commit against their brethren when they zealously defend violence against other women.

Institutions like the National Commission for Women and the State Commissions for Women should take up charge of designing intervention programmes and if needed put in processes of strongly pointing out that these women are wrong and will be reprimanded if needed.

http://m.firstpost.com/life/west-bengal-gangrape-when-women-defend-brutality-1357027.html?page=1

These attitudes sound pretty familiar around the world, even around the block...
JanuaryBaby06
by on Jan. 25, 2014 at 12:52 AM

A must read on this topic is a book called "Half the Sky".

JanuaryBaby06
by on Jan. 25, 2014 at 1:01 AM

Woman are sometimes worse then men in these areas. I find if people have to abide by rules they hold others to the same standards and perils as they forced which is normal when living in a Patriarchy . As I said read Half the Sky, it's a great introductory to such matters. It is a must read and explains so much about culture and woman's rights and lack of and sex trade and the amount of madams that run sex houses. It's a great but sometimes tough book, can be rewarding if taken in the correct tone though.

Quoting kerryket: This is disturbing as well

West Bengal gangrape: When women defend brutality
According to a report on The Times of India, the women in the village boycotted the media, sparred with the police and even told reporters and authorities that the victim needed to be reprimanded for her for her conduct.

While women worldwide are trying to mitigate sexual violence, there are others who help perpetuate it. Agencies.
by FP Staff 24 Jan 14:20 pm IST
     
As is the tradition with reporting incidents of sexual violence in the mainstream media, one gruesome detail after other of the gangrape of a 20-year-old tribal girl in Birbhum has been steadily tumbling out on newspapers, TV channels and social media. After the village headman was arrested alongside the 13 rape accused, some villagers agreed to talk to reporters, recounting a horrific incident piece by piece where a village stood aside and watched as a 20-year-old got brutalized all night.

A village comprising as many women as men. None of whom, presumably, uttered a single word in protest when the proceedings were ordered and then carried out. While you might want to jump in the defence of these women - any woman in such a set up must be horrified enough to not speak up - there are only as many redeeming qualities about them as the men in the village, who saw no problem in what was happening.

According to a report on The Times of India, the women in the village boycotted the media, sparred with the police and even told reporters and authorities that the victim needed to be reprimanded for her conduct. Many of them even tried to stop the police from arresting the men and fronted a strong protest, declaring that the men were innocent and were being framed.

TOI quotes a woman in the village as saying:

"We know that she lived elsewhere with that mason. She made a lot of money. How can we allow the family back? Nothing happened. She made false allegations against our family members because we opposed her illicit relationship," said Panmuni Tudu, a villager.

While we routinely hold men responsible for atrocities on women, the social narrative doesn't always bring up the issue of the Indian woman's participation in perpetuating the tradition of....
sexual violence against other women. Misogyny, in fact, is as much a disease with women as it is with men in India.

A recent debate, led by CNN IBN deputy editor Sagarika Ghose, televised at Khirkee extension saw women in the neighborhood enthusiastically defending Somnath Bharti's actions. In fact, a lady even ran towards a guest wagging her finger violently, while reiterating the fact that the women who were hauled up were indeed on the wrong side of law.

In another incident, reported by a single mother living in Kolkata, a whole middle class neighbourhood, women included verbally assaulted her and threatened her when she dared to scold a gang of teenage boys for continuously harassing her introverted, shy teenaged son. One of the boys she scolded had even pulled her son's shorts down in public, which led the single mother to intervene. Alongside the men, she said in her account, the women in the neighbour questioned her character, her choice of clothes and branded her a careless, loose woman.

In 2011, a lesbian couple committed suicide in Bengal after they were forcibly separated by the villagers. Most women in the village scathingly criticised the victims, where as the men came up with more diplomatic explanations for having them separated.

Across class, caste and religion, violence against women have been perpetuated and has thrived with support and participation from the women themselves. It is maybe time to make women accountable for the crimes they commit against their brethren when they zealously defend violence against other women.

Institutions like the National Commission for Women and the State Commissions for Women should take up charge of designing intervention programmes and if needed put in processes of strongly pointing out that these women are wrong and will be reprimanded if needed.

http://m.firstpost.com/life/west-bengal-gangrape-when-women-defend-brutality-1357027.html?page=1

These attitudes sound pretty familiar around the world, even around the block...


JoJoBean8
by Silver Member on Jan. 25, 2014 at 11:47 AM

So horrible!

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