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Devout Christian mother-of-three, 31, becomes first woman in Britain to DIE from cannabis poisoning after smoking a joint in bed to help her sleep

Posted by on Jan. 31, 2014 at 12:56 AM
  • 11 Replies


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Gemma Moss from Bouremouth, Dorset, is believed to have become the first woman in Britain to die directly from cannabis poisoning

A young mother of three died after she was poisoned by the cannabis she smoked to help her get to sleep.

Gemma Moss, 31, was killed by the level of the drug in her blood, an inquest heard.

The regular churchgoer, who was found dead in her bedroom, is thought to be the first woman in Britain known to have died directly from cannabis poisoning. 

Her death was caused by cannabis toxicity, and a coroner recorded a verdict of death by cannabis abuse.

The inquest was told that Miss Moss smoked half a joint a night to help her sleep.

The devout Christian had  been a frequent user but stopped for two years before her death last October.

Her family say she started using the drug again to help her sleep after becoming depressed when she split up with her boyfriend. 

A female friend told police Miss Moss smoked as much as £60 worth of the drug a week, although her family disputed this.

On the night of October 28  last year Miss Moss, who had two sons, Tyler, 15, and Tessiah, eight, and a daughter who lives abroad, went to bed after rolling a joint.

She was found the following morning by Tyler’s girlfriend who called an ambulance to the flat in Bournemouth. 

 

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Miss Moss was pronounced dead at the scene.

Half a joint was found underneath her body and a wrapper containing brown and green leaves of the class B drug was discovered in her handbag.

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The mother-of-three gave up cannabis for two years, but had recently turned back to the drug in an effort to beat her insomnia

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Her friend said she and Miss Moss smoked cannabis worth about £20 together in the week before her death

A post mortem examination revealed that there were no obvious signs of abnormality in Miss Moss’s body. Pathologist Dr Kudair Hussein told the inquest in Bournemouth there were ‘moderate to heavy’ levels of cannabis-related chemicals in her blood.

Bournemouth coroner Mr Sheriff Payne asked Dr Hussein: ‘You are satisfied it was the effects of cannabis that caused her death?’ Dr Hussein replied: ‘Yes sir.’

In 2004 a 36-year-old man from Pembrokeshire became the first known person in the UK to die from cannabis toxicity.

A spokesman for the National Drug Prevention Alliance, David Raynes, said: ‘It is extremely rare and unusual for a coroner to rule death from cannabis abuse.

‘This case serves as a warning that cannabis can cause immense harm. Cannabis is known to increase heart rate and blood pressure. Cannabis these days is designed to be much stronger to meet demand of users who want a stronger hit.’

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Tests of her vital organs found nothing wrong with them although it was suggested she might have suffered a cardiac arrest triggered by cannabis toxicity

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Cannabis use can lead to significant increases in heart rate and a lowering of the blood pressure. For this reason patients with a history of angina or other cardiovascular disease could be at risk

Miss Moss regularly attended the evangelical Citygate Church in Bournemouth and was baptised there last year.

 

One minor toxic side-effect of taking cannabis is the short-term effect on the heart and vascular system.

This can lead to significant increases in heart rate and a lowering of the blood pressure. For this reason patients with a history of angina or other cardiovascular disease could be at risk.

In Britain, official government statistics listed five deaths from cannabis in the period 1993-1995, but a House of Lords Report from 1998 reports that on closer examination these proved to have been deaths due to inhalation of vomit that could not be directly attributed to cannabis.

Cannabis impairs psychomotor performance in a wide variety of tasks, and fatal accidents, such as from car crashes or from operating heavy machinery, have been recorded.

However, several studies have demonstrated the therapeutic effects of cannabinoids for nausea and vomiting in the advanced stages of illnesses such as cancer and AIDS.

An active ingredient, tetrahydrocannabinol, has been available by prescription for more than a decade in the USA.

Other therapeutic uses of cannabinoids are being demonstrated by controlled studies, including treatment of asthma and glaucoma.

Her mother, Kim Furness, told the inquest her daughter struggled to sleep and had admitted that she had started smoking  a ‘small amount’ of cannabis  at night.

Miss Furness said: ‘It was one half of a joint to get to sleep. She never smoked in the day. She was really honest about cannabis. She was trying to stop again. She wasn’t excessively smoking.’ 

In recording a verdict that Miss Moss died from drug abuse, Mr Payne said: ‘Gemma had been a long-term user of cannabis.

‘She suffered from depression and was on prescription drugs to try and deal with that although it would not appear she was taking them at the time of her death.

‘She usually used it (cannabis) in the evenings to try and help her to get to sleep and did not use it in the daytime.

‘The post mortem could find  no natural cause for her death with the balance of probability that it is more likely than  not that she died from the effects of cannabis.’

Carolyn Stuart, a coroner’s officer, said: ‘It is very rare to have cannabis toxicity as a cause of death. She was a healthy 31-year-old woman who had nothing wrong with her.’

Russell White, a leader at  the Citygate Church, said: ‘Gemma was a good mother  and brought up her children mainly on her own.

‘She was full of fun and loved life and loved coming to church. She was a committed member of the church and brought her children along. 

'She is very much missed and her death was a real shock to us.’

Miss Moss lived with her sons but it is believed her daughter lives with her father in Jamaica.



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2548669/Devout-Christian-mother-three-31-woman-Britain-DIE-cannabis-poisoning-smoking-joint-bed.html#ixzz2rx7thD3C 
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by on Jan. 31, 2014 at 12:56 AM
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cfcf
by Member on Jan. 31, 2014 at 1:07 AM
Where do you find these junk articles? I mean the actual quality of writing sucks. Is it just me or are several paragraphs repeating but in different order. It's hard to believe what is written when it has similar characteristics to the emails I get from "Nigerian princes."

Friday
by Platinum Member on Jan. 31, 2014 at 1:09 AM

I call Shenanigans.

 


Thank God......it's Friday!!!

Ziva65
by Bronze Member on Jan. 31, 2014 at 2:00 AM
1 mom liked this

IDK. I've read some studies on THC poisoning. It's pretty significant overdoses, but people react differently. All sorts of effects including low heart rate, excessive vomiting. I suppose anything is possible really. Maybe she even built up an allergy, perhaps it was a bad batch. I'm not sure how it's metabolized, but perhaps it built up in her liver as it says she was a long term user.

 

Clairwil
by Platinum Member on Jan. 31, 2014 at 6:04 AM


Quoting Friday:

I call Shenanigans.

(source)

Moss, a devout Christian who was baptised last year, was known to use cannabis regularly throughout her adult life, but had stopped for two years before her death.

She began using it again to help her sleep after becoming anxious and depressed following the breakup of her relationship, the inquest heard.

gemma moss cannabis death

A post-mortem examination found no natural cause for Moss's death

Half of a joint was found underneath her body and a wrapper containing brown and green leaves of the class B drug was discovered in her handbag.

Her friend, Zara Hill, told police Moss smoked as much as £60 of the drug a week, although this was disputed by her family.

Pathologist Dr Kudair Hussein told the inquest: "The physical examination and the examination of various organs including the heart and the liver showed no abnormality that could account for her death.

"The level of canabinoids in the blood were 0.1 to 0.15 miligrams per litre, this is considered as moderate to heavy cannabis use.

"I looked through literature and it's well known that cannabis is of very low toxicity.

"But there are reports which say cannabis can be considered as a cause of death because it can induce a cardiac arrest."

peter reynolds

Peter Reynolds is the leader of Cannabis Law Reform (CLEAR)

Mr Sheriff Payne, the Bournemouth coroner, asked Dr Hussein: "You are satisfied it was the affects of cannabis that caused her death."

Dr Hussain replied: "Yes sir."

Deaths through cannabis poisoning are highly unusual. In 2004 a 36-year-old man from Pembrokeshire was believed to have become the first person in the UK to die from cannabis toxicity.

Yet a 2011 NHS publication entitled A Summary Of The Health Harms of Drugs detailing “acute adverse effects associated with the use of cannabis” reads: “No cases of fatal overdose have been reported. No confirmed cases of human deaths.”

In recording a verdict that Moss died from drug abuse, Mr Payne said: "Gemma had been a long-term user of cannabis.

"She suffered from depression and was on prescription drugs to try and deal with that although it would not appear she was taking them at the time of her death.

"She usually used it (cannabis) in the evenings to try and help her to get to sleep and did not use it in the day time.

"The post-mortem could find no natural cause for her death.

Clairwil
by Platinum Member on Jan. 31, 2014 at 6:06 AM

For balance, here's a response to that:

(source)

At the end of November last year, the Dorset Echo reported the opening of an inquest after a woman was found unresponsive at her home in Walpole Road, Boscombe. The hearing was told that Gemma Moss, 31, died due to cannabis toxicity. The inquest was adjourned for a full hearing on 21st January 2014.

Today I received a phone call from a news agency indicating that the verdict was death due to cannabis toxicity and asking me for my comments.  This is the information that I provided.

It is popularly believed that there has never been a death directly attributable to the use cannabis anywhere in the world – that is because of a toxic effect of cannabis on the body. Clearly, it is possible that somebody may have had an accident while intoxicated through cannabis use but that would be an indirect cause.

Indeed, the NHS publication ‘A summary of the health harms of drugs’ states: “No cases of fatal overdoses have been reported. No confirmed cases of human deaths”. Source: page 31,http://www.nta.nhs.uk/uploads/healthharmsfinal-v1.pdf

Science does support the principle that it is impossible to overdose on cannabis. See:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Effects_of_cannabis#Toxicity

Cannabis is probably the least toxic therapeutically active substance known to man. Its Therapeutic Ratio (TR) is so high as to be virtually impossible to calculate but is believed to be between 1:20000 and 1:40000. Thus if 100mg of cannabis would produce an effect, between two to four kilos (taken at once) would be fatal. This amount is, of course, impossible to consume.

Therapeutic Ratio (TR) is the ratio of effective dose for 50% of users (ED50) to lethal dose for 50% of users (LD50). The TR of alcohol is 1:20. TR of heroin is 1:5.

Also, cannabis works on our body because it modulates the endocannabinoid system which consts of a network of CB1 and CB2 receptors throughout the body and endocannabinoids which are the body’s natural chemicals equivalent to the chemicals in the cannabis plant. The CB1 receptor is now believed to be the most prevalent receptor in the brain but does not exist in the brain stem which controls the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. This is why, unlike opiates, alcohol or other drugs, cannabis cannot depress basic life functions to the point of death.

Clairwil
by Platinum Member on Jan. 31, 2014 at 6:09 AM


Quoting Ziva65:

anything is possible really. Maybe she even built up an allergy, perhaps it was a bad batch.

It is worth noting that joints are not legal in the UK, so it would have been supplied by a source that isn't monitored for quality in any way.

Friday
by Platinum Member on Jan. 31, 2014 at 4:32 PM


Quoting Clairwil:


Quoting Friday:

I call Shenanigans.

(source)

Moss, a devout Christian who was baptised last year, was known to use cannabis regularly throughout her adult life, but had stopped for two years before her death.

She began using it again to help her sleep after becoming anxious and depressed following the breakup of her relationship, the inquest heard.

gemma moss cannabis death

A post-mortem examination found no natural cause for Moss's death


Half of a joint was found underneath her body and a wrapper containing brown and green leaves of the class B drug was discovered in her handbag.

Her friend, Zara Hill, told police Moss smoked as much as £60 of the drug a week, although this was disputed by her family.

Pathologist Dr Kudair Hussein told the inquest: "The physical examination and the examination of various organs including the heart and the liver showed no abnormality that could account for her death.

"The level of canabinoids in the blood were 0.1 to 0.15 miligrams per litre, this is considered as moderate to heavy cannabis use.

"I looked through literature and it's well known that cannabis is of very low toxicity.

"But there are reports which say cannabis can be considered as a cause of death because it can induce a cardiac arrest."

peter reynolds

Peter Reynolds is the leader of Cannabis Law Reform (CLEAR)


Mr Sheriff Payne, the Bournemouth coroner, asked Dr Hussein: "You are satisfied it was the affects of cannabis that caused her death."

Dr Hussain replied: "Yes sir."

Deaths through cannabis poisoning are highly unusual. In 2004 a 36-year-old man from Pembrokeshire was believed to have become the first person in the UK to die from cannabis toxicity.

Yet a 2011 NHS publication entitled A Summary Of The Health Harms of Drugs detailing “acute adverse effects associated with the use of cannabis” reads: “No cases of fatal overdose have been reported. No confirmed cases of human deaths.”

In recording a verdict that Moss died from drug abuse, Mr Payne said: "Gemma had been a long-term user of cannabis.

"She suffered from depression and was on prescription drugs to try and deal with that although it would not appear she was taking them at the time of her death.

"She usually used it (cannabis) in the evenings to try and help her to get to sleep and did not use it in the day time.

"The post-mortem could find no natural cause for her death.

I read the article before commenting, even searched to see if there were any other sources.

I'm calling shenanigans on the doctor and coroner involved. Thousands of years of use w/o any direct deaths and a lady who smokes 1/2 a joint at bedtime, who has smoked in the past, dies from cannabis toxcity? Unlikely.

 


Thank God......it's Friday!!!

Clairwil
by Platinum Member on Jan. 31, 2014 at 4:49 PM


Quoting Friday:


I'm calling shenanigans on the doctor and coroner involved. Thousands of years of use w/o any direct deaths and a lady who smokes 1/2 a joint at bedtime, who has smoked in the past, dies from cannabis toxcity? Unlikely.

Unlikely things do happen.

People die, on rare occasions, from bee stings, peanuts, hiccups and many other normally non-fatal things.

The coroner didn't PROVE it was.  He just said he couldn't see any other cause and, since it was in her blood stream, noted that down as being the most likely cause.

I don't think there's cause to call incompetence, let alone conspiracy.

gludwig2000
by Gina on Jan. 31, 2014 at 6:04 PM

 It must be very unusual, but then, unusual things happen all of the time. People have died from drinking too much water.

Patti-Gee
by Member on Jan. 31, 2014 at 8:03 PM

Along with a little Tom Foolery..

Quoting Friday:

I call Shenanigans.


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