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Ripples of Nevada Range Showdown Spreading in West

Posted by on Apr. 12, 2014 at 1:02 AM
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Ripples of Nevada Range Showdown Spreading in West

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Images of a forced cattle roundup on a rural Nevada range sent ripples through the West on Friday, prompting elected officials in several states to weigh in, militia members to mobilize and federal land managers to reshape elements of the operation.

Ripples of Nevada Range Showdown Spreading in West

Embattled Bunkerville rancher Cliven Bundy, left, and his son Dave Bundy talk to a reporter on the corner of North Las Vegas Boulevard and East Stewart Avenue in downtown Las Vegas Monday, April 7, 2014. The 37-year-old Dave Bundy was taken into custody by federal agents on Sunday afternoon along state Route 170 near Mesquite. He was released Monday after being issued citations for failing to disperse and resisting arrest. The Bureau of Land Management has begun to round up what they call “trespass cattle” that rancher Cliven Bundy has been grazing in the Gold Butte area 80 miles northeast of Las Vegas.(AP Photo/Las Vegas Review-Journal, K.M. Cannon)

Bureau of Land Management officials dismantled designated protest areas Thursday and Nevada’s governor urged calm as the fight over rancher Cliven Bundy’s cattle widened into a debate about states’ rights and federal land-use policy.

The dispute that triggered the roundup dates to 1993, when the BLM cited concern for the federally protected tortoise. The agency later revoked Bundy’s grazing rights.

Bundy claims ancestral rights to graze his cattle on lands his Mormon family settled in the 19th century. He stopped paying grazing fees and disregarded several court orders to remove his animals.

BLM officials say Bundy now owes more than $1.1 million in unpaid grazing fees.

“I’m seeing a lot of passionate Americans willing to stand up for important rights,” said Nevada state Assemblywoman Michele Fiore.

Fiore, a Republican, said Friday she has been making the 80-mile drive from Las Vegas to a growing tent city of militia members, advocates and protesters in dusty but scenic rangeland near Bundy’s ranch, just east of the Virgin River. She said she was horrified that BLM police used stun guns on one of Bundy’s adult sons during a Wednesday confrontation on a state highway near the Bundy melon farm in the Gold Butte area.

Video of that confrontation has spread on the Internet, along with blog commentary claiming excessive government force and calls to arms from self-described militia leaders. Some have invoked references to deadly confrontations with federal authorities, including a siege of a ranch home in Ruby Ridge, Idaho, in 1992 and the fiery destruction of a religious compound near Waco, Texas, that killed 76 people in 1993.

In Arizona, a congressman said he and several state Republican lawmakers may travel to Bunkerville to protest what they perceive as government heavy-handedness.

Ripples of Nevada Range Showdown Spreading in West

Supporters prepare to rally for Cliven Bundy at the Bundy ranch near Bunkerville Nev. Monday, April 7, 2014. The Bureau of Land Management has begun to round up what they call “trespass cattle” that rancher Cliven Bundy has been grazing in the Gold Butte area 80 miles northeast of Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Las Vegas Review-Journal, John Locher)

Ripples of Nevada Range Showdown Spreading in West

People help erect a pole to hang a banner during a rally in support of Cliven Bundy near Bunkerville Nev. Monday, April 7, 2014, 2014. The Bureau of Land Management has begun to round up what they call “trespass cattle” that rancher Cliven Bundy has been grazing in the Gold Butte area 80 miles northeast of Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Las Vegas Review-Journal, John Locher)

Ripples of Nevada Range Showdown Spreading in West

Rancher Derrel Spencer speaks during a rally in support of Cliven Bundy near Bunkerville Nev. Monday, April 7, 2014, 2014. The Bureau of Land Management has begun to round up what they call “trespass cattle” that rancher Cliven Bundy has been grazing in the Gold Butte area 80 miles northeast of Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Las Vegas Review-Journal, John Locher)

U.S. Rep. Bob Thorpe of Flagstaff said he and state legislators weren’t arguing whether Bundy broke laws or violated grazing agreements. Thorpe said the Arizona lawmakers were upset the BLM initially restricted protesters to so-called free speech zones.

U.S. Sen. Dean Heller and Gov. Brian Sandoval, both Republicans, have also said they were upset with the way the BLM was conducting the roundup.

After the areas were removed Thursday, Sandoval issued a new statement.

“Although tensions remain high, escalation of current events could have negative, long lasting consequences that can be avoided,” it said.

Amy Lueders, BLM state director in Nevada, said Friday that two protesters were detained, cited for failure to comply with officers at a barricade on Thursday and released.

That brought to three the number of arrests. Bundy’s son, Dave Bundy, was arrested Sunday on State Route 170 and released Monday with citations accusing him of refusing to disperse and resisting arrest.

Lueders said 380 cows were collected by Thursday. She declined to provide a cost estimate for the herding operation.

Ripples of Nevada Range Showdown Spreading in West

Contractors for the Bureau of Land Management round up cattle belonging to Cliven Bundy with a helicopter near Bunkerville, Nev. Monday, April 7, 2014. The Bureau of Land Management has begun to round up what they call “trespass cattle” that rancher Cliven Bundy has been grazing in the Gold Butte area 80 miles northeast of Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Las Vegas Review-Journal, John Locher)

Ripples of Nevada Range Showdown Spreading in West

Cattle belonging to Cliven Bundy are rounded up with a helicopter near Bunkerville Nev. Monday, April 7, 2014. The Bureau of Land Management has begun to round up what they call “trespass cattle” that rancher Cliven Bundy has been grazing in the Gold Butte area 80 miles northeast of Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Las Vegas Review-Journal, John Locher)

The roundup started Saturday, after the BLM and National Park Service shut down an area half the size of Delaware to let cowhands using helicopters and vehicles gather about 900 cattle that officials say are trespassing.

Bundy, 67, and his large family cast their resistance to the roundup as a constitutional stand. He says he doesn’t recognize federal authority over state land.

More from CBS News: http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2014/04/11/ripples-of-nevada-range-showdown-spreading-in-west/

by on Apr. 12, 2014 at 1:02 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Gerbert007
by on Apr. 12, 2014 at 11:40 AM
2 moms liked this
Seems legit.
http://specialoperationsspeaks.com/


-Celestial-
by Pepperlynn on Apr. 12, 2014 at 11:45 AM

Hes been told, hes been warned.....

Billiejeens
by Ruby Member on Apr. 12, 2014 at 1:12 PM
Seems as if the turtle nonsense is just non-sense.

The Government needs that land for a Chinese Solar panel plant, is what I hear.

29again
by Gold Member on Apr. 12, 2014 at 1:22 PM

And I hear now that the standoff has been called off by the feds.  Something about safety concerns. 


Maybe now they will let him pay the county, the way it should be?  And I want to know how the hell they get $1.1 million in back fees.  The math does not compute.  Or have the feds switched to common core math?



mjmorrison
by Member on Apr. 12, 2014 at 2:21 PM


abcnews.go.com
Nevada Cattle Rancher Wins 'Range War' With Feds

PHOTO: Federal agents clash with armed protestors over a ranchers 20-year tax fight. Federal agents clash with armed protestors over a rancher's 20-year tax fight. ABC News Share
ABC US News | ABC Business NewsCopy

A Nevada cattle rancher appears to have won his week-long battle with the federal government over a controversial cattle roundup that had led to the arrest of several protesters.

Cliven Bundy went head to head with the Bureau of Land Management over the removal of hundreds of his cattle from federal land, where the government said they were grazing illegally.

Bundy claims his herd of roughly 900 cattle have grazed on the land along the riverbed near Bunkerville, 80 miles northeast of Las Vegas, since 1870 and threatened a "range war" against the BLM on the Bundy Ranch website after one of his sons was arrested while protesting the removal of the cattle.

"I have no contract with the United States government," Bundy said. "I was paying grazing fees for management and that's what BLM was supposed to be, land managers and they were managing my ranch out of business, so I refused to pay."

The federal government had countered that Bundy "owes the American people in excess of $1 million " in unpaid grazing fees and "refuses to abide by the law of land, despite many opportunities over the last 20 years to do so."

However, today the BLM said it would not enforce a court order to remove the cattle and was pulling out of the area.

"Based on information about conditions on the ground, and in consultation with law enforcement, we have made a decision to conclude the cattle gather because of our serious concern about the safety of employees and members of the public," BLM Director Neil Kornze said.

"We ask that all parties in the area remain peaceful and law-abiding as the Bureau of Land Management and National Park Service work to end the operation in an orderly manner," he said.

The roundup began April 5, following lengthy court proceedings dating back to 1993, federal officials said. Federal officers began impounding the first lot of cows last weekend, and Bundy responded by inviting supporters onto his land to protest the action.

"It's not about cows, it's about freedom," Utah resident Yonna Winget told ABC News affiliate KTNV in Las Vegas, Nevada.

"People are getting tired of the federal government having unlimited power," Bundy's wife, Carol Bundy told ABC News.

By Sunday, April 6, one of Bundy's sons, Dave Bundy, was taken into custody for refusing to disperse and resisting arrest, while hundreds of other protesters, some venturing from interstate, gathered along the road few miles from Bundy's property in solidarity. Dave Bundy was later released.

A spokesman for the Bundy encampment told ABC News roughly 300 protesters had assembled for the protest, while a BLM representative estimated there were around 100 people.

"We want a peaceful protest, but we also want our voices heard," said Cliven Bundy's sister, Chrisie Marshall Bundy.

But clashes between demonstrators and authorities took a violent turn on Wednesday, with cell phone video showing some being tasered at the site, including Bundy's son, Ammon Bundy. Two other protesters were detained, cited and later released on Thursday, according to the BLM.

As the movement grew by the day, and demonstrators rallied together, bonding by campfires at night, local protest leaders warned people not to wear camouflage and keep their weapons inside their vehicles.

Both sides said the issue is one of fairness, with the federal government maintaining that thousands of other cattle ranchers are abiding by the law by paying their annual grazing fees, while Bundy's family and supporters say the government's actions are threatening ranchers' freedoms.

"It's about the freedom of America," said another of Bundy's sisters, Margaret Houston. "We have to stand up and fight."

ABC News' Alan Farnham contributed to this report.

Analeigh2012
by Silver Member on Apr. 12, 2014 at 3:02 PM
2 moms liked this
The government needed to back down... regardless who I feel is right, militias all across the country have been waiting for a spark to set off mobilizing against the country. This has been a very dangerous situation, IMO.
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grandmab125
by Platinum Member on Apr. 12, 2014 at 3:33 PM
1 mom liked this

 Maybe someone reminded the powers that be in DC of 'Ruby Ridge' and 'Waco'.  Americans don't take kindly to armed gov't goons charging into a situation with guns ablazing.

blondekosmic15
by Blonde on Apr. 12, 2014 at 4:46 PM

Obama admin has compassion for the tortoise but no compassion nor sympathy for millions of aborted babies. Something seriously wrong in the White House!

blondekosmic15
by Blonde on Apr. 12, 2014 at 4:49 PM

I believe riots are on the horizon because of gov't control in our lives. Increasingly becoming worse under this admin. I'm not alone here...

blondekosmic15
by Blonde on Apr. 12, 2014 at 5:34 PM

NATIONAL NEWS




4 hours 14 minutes ago by Teri Okita - CBS News

Nevada rancher's fight with feds reaches boiling point

A confrontation in Nevada threatens to become a modern-day range war. The government is taking away a rancher's herd, and tensions are running high.

Rancher Cliven Bundy said his land has been in his family since the 1870s, Teri Okita reports. In his mind, he's not just fighting against some unfair fees. He said he's trying to keep Uncle Sam out of everyone's backyard.

Tensions reached the boiling point earlier this week after simmering for years in a Nevada turf battle pitting Bundy against the federal government. Bundy said, "We haven't lost this battle. We've just barely begun."

Armed protestors and militia members from around the country continue to arrive to join the showdown; some protestors have come from as far away as Montana and Florida.

U.S. rangers are rounding up Bundy's cattle, claiming he has been illegally grazing his herds on 600,000 acres of federal lands for two decades. The Bureau of Land Management, or BLM, said Bundy's unpaid land use fees total more than $1 million. Bundy said he doesn't have to pay because he has no contract with the federal government.

He said, "The money's not the deal. The cows are not the deal. It's freedom and liberty and access to our land and get rid of this abusive government."

Two federal judges issued orders last year that if the 67-year-old rancher did not remove his cattle from the land, they could be seized. The seizure began Saturday.

Demonstrators have rallied to support Bundy, leading to an altercation with law enforcement officials Wednesday, when one of Bundy's sons was tased after kicking a police dog.

Ammon Bundy said, "Then they tased me again, and they pulled it out again, probably because I didn't drop on the ground."

Jim Lordy came from Montana to join the protesters. He said he and other militia members are not afraid to shoot if necessary. Lordy, of Operation Mutual Aid, said, "Why the gun? Well, they have guns. We need guns to protect ourselves from a tyrannical government."

The Bureau of Land Management said this is a matter of equity and fairness to the 16,000 ranchers and farmers who do manage to pay their fees every year. No matter what the BLM does with his cattle, Bundy said this fight is bigger than he is. He said, "I'm guess maybe I'm a little bit like the Founding Fathers. I got a job to do, and I'm going to do it the best I can."

Authorities want the cattle off the land for another reason. Environmentalists say it's home to the endangered desert tortoise, and it's protected land.

© 2014 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.





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