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Corrie Ten Boom A Story Of Forgiveness

Posted by on May. 9, 2014 at 7:32 PM
  • 24 Replies
4 moms liked this

http://www.familylifeeducation.org/gilliland/procgroup/CorrieTenBoom.htm


Corrie Ten Boom Story on Forgiving

“It was in a church in Munich that I saw him—a balding, heavyset man in a gray overcoat, a brown felt hat clutched between his hands. People were filing out of the basement room where I had just spoken, moving along the rows of wooden chairs to the door at the rear. It was 1947 and I had come from Holland to defeated Germany with the message that God forgives.

“It was the truth they needed most to hear in that bitter, bombed-out land, and I gave them my favorite mental picture. Maybe because the sea is never far from a Hollander’s mind, I liked to think that that’s where forgiven sins were thrown. ‘When we confess our sins,’ I said, ‘God casts them into the deepest ocean, gone forever. …’

“The solemn faces stared back at me, not quite daring to believe. There were never questions after a talk in Germany in 1947. People stood up in silence, in silence collected their wraps, in silence left the room.

“And that’s when I saw him, working his way forward against the others. One moment I saw the overcoat and the brown hat; the next, a blue uniform and a visored cap with its skull and crossbones. It came back with a rush: the huge room with its harsh overhead lights; the pathetic pile of dresses and shoes in the center of the floor; the shame of walking naked past this man. I could see my sister’s frail form ahead of me, ribs sharp beneath the parchment skin. Betsie, how thin you were!

[Betsie and I had been arrested for concealing Jews in our home during the Nazi occupation of Holland; this man had been a guard at Ravensbruck concentration camp where we were sent.]

“Now he was in front of me, hand thrust out: ‘A fine message, Fräulein! How good it is to know that, as you say, all our sins are at the bottom of the sea!’

“And I, who had spoken so glibly of forgiveness, fumbled in my pocketbook rather than take that hand. He would not remember me, of course—how could he remember one prisoner among those thousands of women?

“But I remembered him and the leather crop swinging from his belt. I was face-to-face with one of my captors and my blood seemed to freeze.

“ ‘You mentioned Ravensbruck in your talk,’ he was saying, ‘I was a guard there.’ No, he did not remember me.

“ ‘But since that time,’ he went on, ‘I have become a Christian. I know that God has forgiven me for the cruel things I did there, but I would like to hear it from your lips as well. Fräulein,’ again the hand came out—’will you forgive me?’

“And I stood there—I whose sins had again and again to be forgiven—and could not forgive. Betsie had died in that place—could he erase her slow terrible death simply for the asking?

“It could not have been many seconds that he stood there—hand held out—but to me it seemed hours as I wrestled with the most difficult thing I had ever had to do.

“For I had to do it—I knew that. The message that God forgives has a prior condition: that we forgive those who have injured us. ‘If you do not forgive men their trespasses,’ Jesus says, ‘neither will your Father in heaven forgive your trespasses.’

“I knew it not only as a commandment of God, but as a daily experience. Since the end of the war I had had a home in Holland for victims of Nazi brutality. Those who were able to forgive their former enemies were able also to return to the outside world and rebuild their lives, no matter what the physical scars. Those who nursed their bitterness remained invalids. It was as simple and as horrible as that.

“And still I stood there with the coldness clutching my heart. But forgiveness is not an emotion—I knew that too. Forgiveness is an act of the will, and the will can function regardless of the temperature of the heart. ‘… Help!’ I prayed silently. ‘I can lift my hand. I can do that much. You supply the feeling.’

“And so woodenly, mechanically, I thrust my hand into the one stretched out to me. And as I did, an incredible thing took place. The current started in my shoulder, raced down my arm, sprang into our joined hands. And then this healing warmth seemed to flood my whole being, bringing tears to my eyes.

“ ‘I forgive you, brother!’ I cried. ‘With all my heart!’

“For a long moment we grasped each other’s hands, the former guard and the former prisoner. I had never known God’s love so intensely, as I did then”

(excerpted from “I’m Still Learning to Forgive” by Corrie ten Boom. Reprinted by permission from Guideposts Magazine. Copyright © 1972 by Guideposts Associates, Inc., Carmel, New York 10512>).


For anyone whose interested, here's a brief biography of Corrie Ten Boom and her family who saved many Jewish lives during the Holocaust. We could all learn a lesson about forgiveness through her story.

http://tenboom.org/aboutthetenboomsc48.php

by on May. 9, 2014 at 7:32 PM
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jcribb16
by Primrose Foxglove on May. 9, 2014 at 7:52 PM
1 mom liked this

Corrie Ten Boom - definitely a favorite of mine.  True and faithful to God and to the Jewish people.

blondekosmic15
by Blonde on May. 9, 2014 at 8:29 PM
4 moms liked this

Corrie Ten Boom, a beautiful example of forgiveness and loving thy neighbor. 

Thx Faith for posting this...

blondekosmic15
by Blonde on May. 9, 2014 at 8:56 PM
2 moms liked this

Several yrs ago I read a book written by Sen Jeremiah Denton about his captivity in the concentration camp during the Vietnam war. This man's courage and perseverance inspired me tremendously. I have a letter from Sen Denton in response to my letter to him. I wanted to let him know of my deep respect and admiration for his patriotism, love of country and strong faith in God. 

I remember a story in his book. During captivity he was tortured and starved repeatedly by the hands of his communist captors. One day the guard who tortured him entered his cell to replace a light bulb that had burnt out. The guard was short in stature. After several attempts he was unable to reach the bulb in the ceiling. Sen Denton approached the guard and asked if he could help him replace the bulb. He said the guard looked at him quite stunned. He seemed to say why is this man trying to help me when I've tortured and beaten him so many times? As time passed, this guard began talking to Sen Denton. The Senator prayed for this man and all of his captors. A profound story of forgiveness and love. This American hero will always hold a very special place in my heart. May he rest in peace~

Former Alabama Sen. Jeremiah Denton, Vietnam war hero, dies at age 89

Former Alabama Sen. Jeremiah A. Denton Jr., a prisoner of war for more than seven years in North Vietnam, died on Friday in Virginia Beach. Mr. Denton was 89 years old.

His son, Jim Denton, told The Washington Post, which first reported the news, that his father died of a heart ailment.

Mr. Denton, a retired U.S. Rear Admiral, was shot down over the city of Thanh Hoa in Vietnam in 1965 and captured while leading a bombing mission.

He later wrote a book about his experiences.

Mr. Denton grabbed national attention in 1966 when he was forced to give an interview as a prisoner, and he blinked in Morse code with his eyes to spell out the word “torture.”

He later received the Navy Cross and other decorations for his heroism.

Mr. Denton won his seat in the Senate in the 1980 election, making him the first Republican since reconstruction to represent Alabama in the Senate.

Members of Congress mourned his passing.

Rep. Sam Johnson, who was held for nearly seven years as a POW in Hanoi, praised Mr. Denton, saying his friend “symbolized freedom.”

“His patriotism knew no bounds, and his bravery pushed every limit,” Mr. Johnson, Texas Republican, said. “I will always cherish the memories of our friendship forged in the fire as a gift from above. Generations to come will honor and celebrate his legacy of freedom and his leadership in Hanoi — and for America upon his return.

“Jerry, you will always hold a special place in my heart for your bravery, valor and service,” he said.

Arizona Republican Sen. John McCain, who also was held as a POW in North Vietnam for more than five years, said that he was “deeply saddened to learn of the passing of my friend and mentor.”

“As a senior ranking officer in prison, Admiral Denton’s leadership inspired us to persevere, and to resist our captors, in ways we never would have on our own,” Mr. McCain said. “He endured unspeakable pain and suffering because of his steadfast adherence to our code of conduct.”

Mr. McCain said that Mr. Denton “exemplified our POW slogan: ‘Home with honor.’”

President Obama said he and first lady Michelle Obama sent their condolences to Mr. Denton’s family.



 http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/mar/28/former-alabama-sen-jeremiah-denton-war-hero-dies/#ixzz31GZoSZO2 

jcribb16
by Primrose Foxglove on May. 9, 2014 at 9:18 PM
1 mom liked this

VVhat a vvonderful te*timony and beautiful *tory that happened.  He *uffered much in Vietnam.  Hovv neat that he vvrote back to you! 

It make* me think of Paul in the pri*on, vvhen the *hackle* opened, and the pri*on keeper thought they ran avvay, and that he vvould have to die for it.  Paul told him they vvere all there, the pri*on keeper vva* *hocked, then a*ked vvhat he *hould do to be *aved; and then he and hi* hou*ehold vvere *aved.

Quoting blondekosmic15:

Several yrs ago I read a book written by Sen Jeremiah Denton about his captivity in the concentration camp during the Vietnam war. This man's courage and perseverance inspired me tremendously. I have a letter from Sen Denton in response to my letter to him. I wanted to let him know of my deep respect and admiration for his patriotism, love of country and strong faith in God. 

I remember a story in his book. During captivity he was tortured and starved repeatedly by the hands of his communist captors. One day the guard who tortured him entered his cell to replace a light bulb that had burnt out. The guard was short in stature. After several attempts he was unable to reach the bulb in the ceiling. Sen Denton approached the guard and asked if he could help him replace the bulb. He said the guard looked at him quite stunned. He seemed to say why is this man trying to help me when I've tortured and beaten him so many times? As time passed, this guard began talking to Sen Denton. The Senator prayed for this man and all of his captors. A profound story of forgiveness and love. This American hero will always hold a very special place in my heart. May he rest in peace~

Former Alabama Sen. Jeremiah Denton, Vietnam war hero, dies at age 89

Former Alabama Sen. Jeremiah A. Denton Jr., a prisoner of war for more than seven years in North Vietnam, died on Friday in Virginia Beach. Mr. Denton was 89 years old.

His son, Jim Denton, told The Washington Post, which first reported the news, that his father died of a heart ailment.

Mr. Denton, a retired U.S. Rear Admiral, was shot down over the city of Thanh Hoa in Vietnam in 1965 and captured while leading a bombing mission.

He later wrote a book about his experiences.

Mr. Denton grabbed national attention in 1966 when he was forced to give an interview as a prisoner, and he blinked in Morse code with his eyes to spell out the word “torture.”

He later received the Navy Cross and other decorations for his heroism.

Mr. Denton won his seat in the Senate in the 1980 election, making him the first Republican since reconstruction to represent Alabama in the Senate.

Members of Congress mourned his passing.

Rep. Sam Johnson, who was held for nearly seven years as a POW in Hanoi, praised Mr. Denton, saying his friend “symbolized freedom.”

“His patriotism knew no bounds, and his bravery pushed every limit,” Mr. Johnson, Texas Republican, said. “I will always cherish the memories of our friendship forged in the fire as a gift from above. Generations to come will honor and celebrate his legacy of freedom and his leadership in Hanoi — and for America upon his return.

“Jerry, you will always hold a special place in my heart for your bravery, valor and service,” he said.

Arizona Republican Sen. John McCain, who also was held as a POW in North Vietnam for more than five years, said that he was “deeply saddened to learn of the passing of my friend and mentor.”

“As a senior ranking officer in prison, Admiral Denton’s leadership inspired us to persevere, and to resist our captors, in ways we never would have on our own,” Mr. McCain said. “He endured unspeakable pain and suffering because of his steadfast adherence to our code of conduct.”

Mr. McCain said that Mr. Denton “exemplified our POW slogan: ‘Home with honor.’”

President Obama said he and first lady Michelle Obama sent their condolences to Mr. Denton’s family.



 http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/mar/28/former-alabama-sen-jeremiah-denton-war-hero-dies/#ixzz31GZoSZO2 


Abaco
by Gold Member on May. 9, 2014 at 9:22 PM
1 mom liked this
True !

Quoting blondekosmic15:

Corrie Ten Boom, a beautiful example of forgiveness and loving thy neighbor. 

Thx Faith for posting this...

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Raintree
by Gold Member on May. 9, 2014 at 9:33 PM
1 mom liked this
I'm glad I know that this is a result of your bad keyboard. Otherwise I'd worry...haha

Quoting jcribb16:

VVhat a vvonderful te*timony and beautiful *tory that happened.  He *uffered much in Vietnam.  Hovv neat that he vvrote back to you! 

It make* me think of Paul in the pri*on, vvhen the *hackle* opened, and the pri*on keeper thought they ran avvay, and that he vvould have to die for it.  Paul told him they vvere all there, the pri*on keeper vva* *hocked, then a*ked vvhat he *hould do to be *aved; and then he and hi* hou*ehold vvere *aved.

Quoting blondekosmic15:

Several yrs ago I read a book written by Sen Jeremiah Denton about his captivity in the concentration camp during the Vietnam war. This man's courage and perseverance inspired me tremendously. I have a letter from Sen Denton in response to my letter to him. I wanted to let him know of my deep respect and admiration for his patriotism, love of country and strong faith in God. 

I remember a story in his book. During captivity he was tortured and starved repeatedly by the hands of his communist captors. One day the guard who tortured him entered his cell to replace a light bulb that had burnt out. The guard was short in stature. After several attempts he was unable to reach the bulb in the ceiling. Sen Denton approached the guard and asked if he could help him replace the bulb. He said the guard looked at him quite stunned. He seemed to say why is this man trying to help me when I've tortured and beaten him so many times? As time passed, this guard began talking to Sen Denton. The Senator prayed for this man and all of his captors. A profound story of forgiveness and love. This American hero will always hold a very special place in my heart. May he rest in peace~

Former Alabama Sen. Jeremiah Denton, Vietnam war hero, dies at age 89

Former Alabama Sen. Jeremiah A. Denton Jr., a prisoner of war for more than seven years in North Vietnam, died on Friday in Virginia Beach. Mr. Denton was 89 years old.

His son, Jim Denton, told The Washington Post, which first reported the news, that his father died of a heart ailment.

Mr. Denton, a retired U.S. Rear Admiral, was shot down over the city of Thanh Hoa in Vietnam in 1965 and captured while leading a bombing mission.

He later wrote a book about his experiences.

Mr. Denton grabbed national attention in 1966 when he was forced to give an interview as a prisoner, and he blinked in Morse code with his eyes to spell out the word “torture.”

He later received the Navy Cross and other decorations for his heroism.

Mr. Denton won his seat in the Senate in the 1980 election, making him the first Republican since reconstruction to represent Alabama in the Senate.

Members of Congress mourned his passing.

Rep. Sam Johnson, who was held for nearly seven years as a POW in Hanoi, praised Mr. Denton, saying his friend “symbolized freedom.”

“His patriotism knew no bounds, and his bravery pushed every limit,” Mr. Johnson, Texas Republican, said. “I will always cherish the memories of our friendship forged in the fire as a gift from above. Generations to come will honor and celebrate his legacy of freedom and his leadership in Hanoi — and for America upon his return.

“Jerry, you will always hold a special place in my heart for your bravery, valor and service,” he said.

Arizona Republican Sen. John McCain, who also was held as a POW in North Vietnam for more than five years, said that he was “deeply saddened to learn of the passing of my friend and mentor.”

“As a senior ranking officer in prison, Admiral Denton’s leadership inspired us to persevere, and to resist our captors, in ways we never would have on our own,” Mr. McCain said. “He endured unspeakable pain and suffering because of his steadfast adherence to our code of conduct.”

Mr. McCain said that Mr. Denton “exemplified our POW slogan: ‘Home with honor.’”

President Obama said he and first lady Michelle Obama sent their condolences to Mr. Denton’s family.



 http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/mar/28/former-alabama-sen-jeremiah-denton-war-hero-dies/#ixzz31GZoSZO2 

Ziva65
by Bronze Member on May. 9, 2014 at 9:43 PM
1 mom liked this

She's amazing. I would only hope I could do that, but I don't know.

My parents survived WW2. My father's dad was taken from their home with horrendous tortures to the whole family. My mom's mom was killed in front of her when she was a toddler. She honestly does have a hard time with American serviceman, because she found out that her mother was killed by an American pilot who decided to drop his bombs on a town after the war ended. the war was over..

They still remember. They don't harbor hatred, and have forgiven. they too are strong Christians. 

They are adamant though that we never forget.

blondekosmic15
by Blonde on May. 9, 2014 at 9:44 PM
1 mom liked this

She's being creative, Rain wink mini

Quoting Raintree: I'm glad I know that this is a result of your bad keyboard. Otherwise I'd worry...haha
Quoting jcribb16:

VVhat a vvonderful te*timony and beautiful *tory that happened.  He *uffered much in Vietnam.  Hovv neat that he vvrote back to you! 

It make* me think of Paul in the pri*on, vvhen the *hackle* opened, and the pri*on keeper thought they ran avvay, and that he vvould have to die for it.  Paul told him they vvere all there, the pri*on keeper vva* *hocked, then a*ked vvhat he *hould do to be *aved; and then he and hi* hou*ehold vvere *aved.

Quoting blondekosmic15:

Several yrs ago I read a book written by Sen Jeremiah Denton about his captivity in the concentration camp during the Vietnam war. This man's courage and perseverance inspired me tremendously. I have a letter from Sen Denton in response to my letter to him. I wanted to let him know of my deep respect and admiration for his patriotism, love of country and strong faith in God. 

I remember a story in his book. During captivity he was tortured and starved repeatedly by the hands of his communist captors. One day the guard who tortured him entered his cell to replace a light bulb that had burnt out. The guard was short in stature. After several attempts he was unable to reach the bulb in the ceiling. Sen Denton approached the guard and asked if he could help him replace the bulb. He said the guard looked at him quite stunned. He seemed to say why is this man trying to help me when I've tortured and beaten him so many times? As time passed, this guard began talking to Sen Denton. The Senator prayed for this man and all of his captors. A profound story of forgiveness and love. This American hero will always hold a very special place in my heart. May he rest in peace~

Former Alabama Sen. Jeremiah Denton, Vietnam war hero, dies at age 89

Former Alabama Sen. Jeremiah A. Denton Jr., a prisoner of war for more than seven years in North Vietnam, died on Friday in Virginia Beach. Mr. Denton was 89 years old.

His son, Jim Denton, told The Washington Post, which first reported the news, that his father died of a heart ailment.

Mr. Denton, a retired U.S. Rear Admiral, was shot down over the city of Thanh Hoa in Vietnam in 1965 and captured while leading a bombing mission.

He later wrote a book about his experiences.

Mr. Denton grabbed national attention in 1966 when he was forced to give an interview as a prisoner, and he blinked in Morse code with his eyes to spell out the word “torture.”

He later received the Navy Cross and other decorations for his heroism.

Mr. Denton won his seat in the Senate in the 1980 election, making him the first Republican since reconstruction to represent Alabama in the Senate.

Members of Congress mourned his passing.

Rep. Sam Johnson, who was held for nearly seven years as a POW in Hanoi, praised Mr. Denton, saying his friend “symbolized freedom.”

“His patriotism knew no bounds, and his bravery pushed every limit,” Mr. Johnson, Texas Republican, said. “I will always cherish the memories of our friendship forged in the fire as a gift from above. Generations to come will honor and celebrate his legacy of freedom and his leadership in Hanoi — and for America upon his return.

“Jerry, you will always hold a special place in my heart for your bravery, valor and service,” he said.

Arizona Republican Sen. John McCain, who also was held as a POW in North Vietnam for more than five years, said that he was “deeply saddened to learn of the passing of my friend and mentor.”

“As a senior ranking officer in prison, Admiral Denton’s leadership inspired us to persevere, and to resist our captors, in ways we never would have on our own,” Mr. McCain said. “He endured unspeakable pain and suffering because of his steadfast adherence to our code of conduct.”

Mr. McCain said that Mr. Denton “exemplified our POW slogan: ‘Home with honor.’”

President Obama said he and first lady Michelle Obama sent their condolences to Mr. Denton’s family.



 http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/mar/28/former-alabama-sen-jeremiah-denton-war-hero-dies/#ixzz31GZoSZO2 


Raintree
by Gold Member on May. 9, 2014 at 9:49 PM
2 moms liked this
I noticed! It's actually quite creative.

Quoting blondekosmic15:

She's being creative, Rain wink mini

Quoting Raintree: I'm glad I know that this is a result of your bad keyboard. Otherwise I'd worry...haha

Quoting jcribb16:

VVhat a vvonderful te*timony and beautiful *tory that happened.  He *uffered much in Vietnam.  Hovv neat that he vvrote back to you! 

It make* me think of Paul in the pri*on, vvhen the *hackle* opened, and the pri*on keeper thought they ran avvay, and that he vvould have to die for it.  Paul told him they vvere all there, the pri*on keeper vva* *hocked, then a*ked vvhat he *hould do to be *aved; and then he and hi* hou*ehold vvere *aved.

Quoting blondekosmic15:

Several yrs ago I read a book written by Sen Jeremiah Denton about his captivity in the concentration camp during the Vietnam war. This man's courage and perseverance inspired me tremendously. I have a letter from Sen Denton in response to my letter to him. I wanted to let him know of my deep respect and admiration for his patriotism, love of country and strong faith in God. 

I remember a story in his book. During captivity he was tortured and starved repeatedly by the hands of his communist captors. One day the guard who tortured him entered his cell to replace a light bulb that had burnt out. The guard was short in stature. After several attempts he was unable to reach the bulb in the ceiling. Sen Denton approached the guard and asked if he could help him replace the bulb. He said the guard looked at him quite stunned. He seemed to say why is this man trying to help me when I've tortured and beaten him so many times? As time passed, this guard began talking to Sen Denton. The Senator prayed for this man and all of his captors. A profound story of forgiveness and love. This American hero will always hold a very special place in my heart. May he rest in peace~

Former Alabama Sen. Jeremiah Denton, Vietnam war hero, dies at age 89

Former Alabama Sen. Jeremiah A. Denton Jr., a prisoner of war for more than seven years in North Vietnam, died on Friday in Virginia Beach. Mr. Denton was 89 years old.

His son, Jim Denton, told The Washington Post, which first reported the news, that his father died of a heart ailment.

Mr. Denton, a retired U.S. Rear Admiral, was shot down over the city of Thanh Hoa in Vietnam in 1965 and captured while leading a bombing mission.

He later wrote a book about his experiences.

Mr. Denton grabbed national attention in 1966 when he was forced to give an interview as a prisoner, and he blinked in Morse code with his eyes to spell out the word “torture.”

He later received the Navy Cross and other decorations for his heroism.

Mr. Denton won his seat in the Senate in the 1980 election, making him the first Republican since reconstruction to represent Alabama in the Senate.

Members of Congress mourned his passing.

Rep. Sam Johnson, who was held for nearly seven years as a POW in Hanoi, praised Mr. Denton, saying his friend “symbolized freedom.”

“His patriotism knew no bounds, and his bravery pushed every limit,” Mr. Johnson, Texas Republican, said. “I will always cherish the memories of our friendship forged in the fire as a gift from above. Generations to come will honor and celebrate his legacy of freedom and his leadership in Hanoi — and for America upon his return.

“Jerry, you will always hold a special place in my heart for your bravery, valor and service,” he said.

Arizona Republican Sen. John McCain, who also was held as a POW in North Vietnam for more than five years, said that he was “deeply saddened to learn of the passing of my friend and mentor.”

“As a senior ranking officer in prison, Admiral Denton’s leadership inspired us to persevere, and to resist our captors, in ways we never would have on our own,” Mr. McCain said. “He endured unspeakable pain and suffering because of his steadfast adherence to our code of conduct.”

Mr. McCain said that Mr. Denton “exemplified our POW slogan: ‘Home with honor.’”

President Obama said he and first lady Michelle Obama sent their condolences to Mr. Denton’s family.



 http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/mar/28/former-alabama-sen-jeremiah-denton-war-hero-dies/#ixzz31GZoSZO2 

blondekosmic15
by Blonde on May. 9, 2014 at 9:54 PM
1 mom liked this

JC, I cried when I read parts of his book. The guard I mentioned, Sen Denton began talking to him about Jesus and the Bible. They parted friends when the war was over.

Another time when Denton was being tortured he said he couldn't take it anymore. The moment he prayed and asked Jesus to help him, he said all the pain subsided. Even when his captors continued to torture him, he felt no pain. He says in the book, God knows when we can't take the suffering anymore. He touched his life and took the pain away. God is always with us. 

Quoting jcribb16:

VVhat a vvonderful te*timony and beautiful *tory that happened.  He *uffered much in Vietnam.  Hovv neat that he vvrote back to you! 

It make* me think of Paul in the pri*on, vvhen the *hackle* opened, and the pri*on keeper thought they ran avvay, and that he vvould have to die for it.  Paul told him they vvere all there, the pri*on keeper vva* *hocked, then a*ked vvhat he *hould do to be *aved; and then he and hi* hou*ehold vvere *aved.

Quoting blondekosmic15:

Several yrs ago I read a book written by Sen Jeremiah Denton about his captivity in the concentration camp during the Vietnam war. This man's courage and perseverance inspired me tremendously. I have a letter from Sen Denton in response to my letter to him. I wanted to let him know of my deep respect and admiration for his patriotism, love of country and strong faith in God. 

I remember a story in his book. During captivity he was tortured and starved repeatedly by the hands of his communist captors. One day the guard who tortured him entered his cell to replace a light bulb that had burnt out. The guard was short in stature. After several attempts he was unable to reach the bulb in the ceiling. Sen Denton approached the guard and asked if he could help him replace the bulb. He said the guard looked at him quite stunned. He seemed to say why is this man trying to help me when I've tortured and beaten him so many times? As time passed, this guard began talking to Sen Denton. The Senator prayed for this man and all of his captors. A profound story of forgiveness and love. This American hero will always hold a very special place in my heart. May he rest in peace~

Former Alabama Sen. Jeremiah Denton, Vietnam war hero, dies at age 89

Former Alabama Sen. Jeremiah A. Denton Jr., a prisoner of war for more than seven years in North Vietnam, died on Friday in Virginia Beach. Mr. Denton was 89 years old.

His son, Jim Denton, told The Washington Post, which first reported the news, that his father died of a heart ailment.

Mr. Denton, a retired U.S. Rear Admiral, was shot down over the city of Thanh Hoa in Vietnam in 1965 and captured while leading a bombing mission.

He later wrote a book about his experiences.

Mr. Denton grabbed national attention in 1966 when he was forced to give an interview as a prisoner, and he blinked in Morse code with his eyes to spell out the word “torture.”

He later received the Navy Cross and other decorations for his heroism.

Mr. Denton won his seat in the Senate in the 1980 election, making him the first Republican since reconstruction to represent Alabama in the Senate.

Members of Congress mourned his passing.

Rep. Sam Johnson, who was held for nearly seven years as a POW in Hanoi, praised Mr. Denton, saying his friend “symbolized freedom.”

“His patriotism knew no bounds, and his bravery pushed every limit,” Mr. Johnson, Texas Republican, said. “I will always cherish the memories of our friendship forged in the fire as a gift from above. Generations to come will honor and celebrate his legacy of freedom and his leadership in Hanoi — and for America upon his return.

“Jerry, you will always hold a special place in my heart for your bravery, valor and service,” he said.

Arizona Republican Sen. John McCain, who also was held as a POW in North Vietnam for more than five years, said that he was “deeply saddened to learn of the passing of my friend and mentor.”

“As a senior ranking officer in prison, Admiral Denton’s leadership inspired us to persevere, and to resist our captors, in ways we never would have on our own,” Mr. McCain said. “He endured unspeakable pain and suffering because of his steadfast adherence to our code of conduct.”

Mr. McCain said that Mr. Denton “exemplified our POW slogan: ‘Home with honor.’”

President Obama said he and first lady Michelle Obama sent their condolences to Mr. Denton’s family.



 http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/mar/28/former-alabama-sen-jeremiah-denton-war-hero-dies/#ixzz31GZoSZO2 


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