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News & Politics News & Politics

Parts Of America Will Be 'Unsuited For Outdoor Activity'

Posted by on Jun. 24, 2014 at 2:35 AM
  • 19 Replies


By Sharon Begley

NEW YORK, June 24 (Reuters) - The old adage, "it's not the heat, it's the humidity," will come into play more often and in more places because of climate change, with life-altering results in southern U.S. cities from Miami to Atlanta to Washington and even northern ones such as New York, Chicago and Seattle.

"As temperatures rise, toward the end of the century, less than an hour of activity outdoors in the shade could cause a moderately fit individual to suffer heat stroke," said climatologist Robert Kopp of Rutgers University, lead scientific author of the report. "That's something that doesn't exist anywhere in the world today."

That result emerges from the heat-and-humidity analysis in "Risky Business," the report on the economic consequences of climate change released on Tuesday. The analysis goes beyond other studies, which have focused on rising temperatures, to incorporate growing medical understanding of the physiological effects of heat and humidity, as well as research on how and where humidity levels will likely rise as the climate changes.

The body's capacity to cool down in hot weather depends on the evaporation of sweat. That keeps skin temperature below 95 degrees Fahrenheit (35 Celsius). Above that, core temperature rises past 98.6F. But if humidity is also high, sweat cannot evaporate, and core temperature can increase until the person collapses from heat stroke.

"If it's humid you can't sweat, and if you can't sweat you can't maintain core body temperature in the heat, and you die," said Dr Al Sommer, dean emeritus of the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University and author of a chapter on health effects in the new report.

The highest heat-plus-humidity reading in the United States was in 1995 in Appleton, Wisconsin, when the outside temperature was 101F. While the Upper Midwest is not known for tropical conditions, climate research shows that it will experience more warming than lower latitudes as well as more humidity.

As a result, the deadliest heat-and-humidity combinations are expected to center around that region, with threads reaching to the Eastern Seaboard and islands of dangerous conditions along the northwest Pacific coast.

If climate change continues on its current trajectory, the report concluded, Midwesterners could see deadly heat-and-humidity pairings (which meteorologists call "wet-bulb temperature") two days every year by later this century.

"It will be functionally impossible to be outside, including for things like construction work and farming, as well as recreation," said climate scientist Michael Oppenheimer of Princeton University.

Even without killer humidity, heat waves are expected to take a larger and larger toll.

The Southeast is expected to be hit with an additional 17 to 52 extremely hot days per year by mid-century and an additional 48 to 130 days by 2100. That could prove deadly for thousands: "Risky Business" projects an additional 15 to 21 deaths per 100,000 people every year from the heat, or 11,000 to 36,000 additional deaths at current population levels. (Editing by Douglas Royalty)

by on Jun. 24, 2014 at 2:35 AM
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Replies (1-10):
survivorinohio
by Rene on Jun. 24, 2014 at 8:45 AM
2 moms liked this

Ok this is going to sound very smart assed but it is not intended to be, I thought Florida was going to be underwater bu the end of the century.

Billiejeens
by Ruby Member on Jun. 24, 2014 at 8:56 AM
1 mom liked this

The temperatures haven't risen since the 1930's.

What else ya got?

Ms.KitKat
by Silver Member on Jun. 24, 2014 at 8:56 AM

Ugh- I can not stand humidity! 

Ms.KitKat
by Silver Member on Jun. 24, 2014 at 8:58 AM
1 mom liked this

Do sink holes count? 

Put enough sink holes together and Florida will be underwater-sortof.

Quoting survivorinohio:

Ok this is going to sound very smart assed but it is not intended to be, I thought Florida was going to be underwater bu the end of the century.


survivorinohio
by Rene on Jun. 24, 2014 at 9:10 AM
2 moms liked this

Yes the sink holes are worrisome.  We recently had one in Cincinati Ohio that trapped a bus, the bus did not fall into the hole thank goodness but the wheels got stuck in the hole.  Depleting aquifers is an issue all over but especially in Fla.  All that sand was designed to be supported by all that water. 

Its one of the Biggest reasons I hate Fracking.  We are endangering the stability of the earth intentionally in that case.

Quoting Ms.KitKat:

Do sink holes count? 

Put enough sink holes together and Florida will be underwater-sortof.

Quoting survivorinohio:

Ok this is going to sound very smart assed but it is not intended to be, I thought Florida was going to be underwater bu the end of the century.


How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


KenneMaw
by Member on Jun. 24, 2014 at 2:27 PM

In the mid and late 70s, we had record snow storms and cold in the midwest.  It wasn't unusual for us to wake up with 18-25" inches of snow overnight.   At the time, the cry was that an ice age was coming.  Now, 40 years later, it is a meltdown. 

mjmorrison
by Member on Jun. 24, 2014 at 4:35 PM
2 moms liked this

GLOBAL WARMING 'FABRICATED' BY NASA AND NOAA

Scientists at two of the world’s leading climate centres - NASA and NOAA - have been caught out manipulating temperature data to overstate the extent of the 20th century "global warming".

The evidence of their tinkering can clearly be seen at Real Science, where blogger Steven Goddard has posted a series of graphs which show "climate change" before and after the adjustments.

When the raw data is used, there is little if any evidence of global warming and some evidence of global cooling. However, once the data has been adjusted - ie fabricated by computer models -  20th century 'global warming' suddenly looks much more dramatic.

This is especially noticeable on the US temperature records. Before 2000, it was generally accepted - even by climate activists like NASA's James Hansen - that the hottest decade in the US was the 1930s.

As Hansen himself said in a 1989 report:

In the U.S. there has been little temperature change in the past 50 years, the time of rapidly increasing greenhouse gases — in fact, there was a slight cooling throughout much of the country.

However, Hansen subsequently changed his tune when, sometime after 2000, the temperatures were adjusted to accord with the climate alarmists' fashionable "global warming" narrative. By cooling the record-breaking year of 1934, and promoting 1998 as the hottest year in US history, the scientists who made the adjustments were able suddenly to show 20th century temperatures shooting up - where before they looked either flat or declining.

But as Goddard notes, the Environmental Protection Agency's heatwave record makes a mockery of these adjustments. It quite clearly shows that the US heat waves of the 1930s were of an order of magnitude greater than anything experienced at any other time during the century - far more severe than those in the 1980s or 1990s which were no worse than those in the 1950s.

These adjustments, however, are not limited to the US temperature data sets. Similar fabrications have taken place everywhere from Iceland to Australia.

The fact that supposedly reputable scientists can make these dishonest adjustments and get away with it is, notes long-time sceptic Christopher Booker, one of the more remarkable anomalies of the great climate change scam.

When I first began examining the global-warming scare, I found nothing more puzzling than the way officially approved scientists kept on being shown to have finagled their data, as in that ludicrous “hockey stick” graph, pretending to prove that the world had suddenly become much hotter than at any time in 1,000 years. Any theory needing to rely so consistently on fudging the evidence, I concluded, must be looked on not as science at all, but as simply a rather alarming case study in the aberrations of group psychology.
29again
by Gold Member on Jun. 24, 2014 at 5:12 PM

confusedYou don't sweat when it's humid??  Ok, then.......

PamR
by Platinum Member on Jun. 24, 2014 at 5:26 PM

May 2014 was Earth's warmest May on record

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Last month was the warmest May for the Earth on record, according to a climate report released Monday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The heat was fueled by unusual warmth in the oceans, which make up more than 70% of the Earth's surface.

"The majority of the world experienced warmer-than-average monthly temperatures, with record warmth across eastern Kazakhstan, parts of Indonesia and central and northwestern Australia," the report from NOAA's National Climatic Data Center noted. "Scattered sections across every major ocean basin were also record warm."

The combined average temperature over the entire globe in May 2014 was 59.93 degrees Fahrenheit, which was 1.33 degrees above the 20th-century average, NOAA said.

The USA was warm in May, but far from a record. A report last week noted that May 2014 was the nation's 32nd warmest May on record.

Global temperature records go back to 1880.

It also marked the 351st consecutive month with a global temperature above the 20th-century average.

EPA LIMITED: Supreme Court limits greenhouse gas regulations

Last week, separate climate data sets from NASA and the Japan Meteorological Agency also found that May was the warmest on record.

For the spring 2014 season, defined as the months of March, April and May, it was the second warmest spring on record. For the year to date, it's been the fifth warmest on record, so far, the climate center reported.

El Niño, a warming of tropical Pacific Ocean water that affects climate and weather patterns around the world, was not present yet in May, the NCDC reported. However, the Climate Prediction Center estimates that there is about a 70% chance that El Niño conditions will develop during the summer of 2014 and an 80% chance it will develop during the fall and winter.

The two warmest years on record, 1998 and 2010, occurred during El Niños.

TappyToes
by Bronze Member on Jun. 24, 2014 at 6:15 PM


Quoting survivorinohio:

Ok this is going to sound very smart assed but it is not intended to be, I thought Florida was going to be underwater bu the end of the century.

Well thats 86 years away.  With sink holes and such, it may be.

sick

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