• In the Spotlight:
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

The world is a better place because Hillary Clinton was secretary of state. Here’s why.

Posted by on Sep. 7, 2016 at 3:44 PM
  • 1 Replies


The world is a better place because Hillary Clinton was secretary of state. Here’s why.

There’s a reason (or seven) the world’s leaders think Hillary was one of the all-time greats as secretary of state.

The world is a better place because Hillary Clinton was secretary of state. Here’s why.

She’s been called one of the finest secretaries of state we’ve ever had.

And someone who once held the same job as Hillary Clinton—former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright—says she’s never met anyone more prepared to be president.

We asked world leaders what made Hillary’s four years as America’s chief diplomat so consequential. Here’s what they had to say.

1. She restored America’s reputation in the world.

The world is a better place because Hillary Clinton was secretary of state. Here’s why.

In 2009, our credibility overseas had been badly damaged after years of unpopular American-led wars in the Middle East. Hillary went to work to restore America’s reputation around the world. She visited 112 countries, brought smart power—coupling diplomacy with the threat of force or sanctions—to U.S. foreign policy, and shaped the global conversation “through her engagement with so many leaders but also the caliber of her intellect,” says former Australian prime minister Julia Gillard.

2. She championed the rights of women and girls around the world.

The world is a better place because Hillary Clinton was secretary of state. Here’s why.

“Hillary knew in her head that if we wanted to build peaceful, economically prosperous nations, then we have to educate girls,” says Prime Minister Gillard. Hillary worked to bring down barriers that stop women and girls from reaching their potential—standing up against sex trafficking; helping women gain access to markets, credit, and training; and leading the fight for a U.N. Security Council resolution to combat sexual violence against women and children in conflict zones.

3. She negotiated the toughest sanctions Iran has ever faced.

The world is a better place because Hillary Clinton was secretary of state. Here’s why.

With Iran at risk of becoming a nuclear nation, Hillary played a critical role persuading Russia, China, and nine other U.N. Security Council countries to impose the toughest sanctions in Iranian history. It was “a remarkable effort,” says former Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta. “And it paid off.”

4. She negotiated a ceasefire between Israel and Hamas.

The world is a better place because Hillary Clinton was secretary of state. Here’s why.

In 2012, conflict between Israel and Hamas was escalating in Gaza, and another war in the Middle East seemed imminent. Hillary flew to Jerusalem, convening meetings with leaders in Ramallah and Cairo, and in 24 hours negotiated a ceasefire—ushering in the quietest year Israel had seen in a decade.

5. She stood up for LGBT rights.

The world is a better place because Hillary Clinton was secretary of state. Here’s why.

Hillary’s boldness in standing up to countries that pushed anti-gay legislation “transform[ed] the way countries perceive and react to homosexuality,” in the words of one U.N. official. And when she declared to the U.N. Human Rights Council in Geneva that gay rights are human rights, commentators called her words “the strongest defense ever in terms of gay rights.”

6. She reinvigorated American diplomacy with Asia.

The world is a better place because Hillary Clinton was secretary of state. Here’s why.

Hillary renewed the United States’ relationships with Asian and Pacific nations, including Japan, South Korea, and Australia. “That’s going to be remembered for many, many long years to come as a diplomatic breakthrough for the U.S.,” says Prime Minister Gillard.

7. She took on the global HIV/AIDS pandemic.

The world is a better place because Hillary Clinton was secretary of state. Here’s why.

During Hillary’s tenure, the U.S. extended antiretroviral therapy—which helps HIV/AIDS patients live longer, healthier lives—to 78 countries. Dr. Eric Goosby, a U.N. public health official, says that action alone is helping to save the lives of millions of people around the world. And it’s bringing us one big step closer to achieving an AIDS-free generation.

Learn more about Hillary Clinton’s plans for national security. 

"Trump is a demagogue and a bigot. He has nothing to say about the important issues facing our country.”~Bernie Sanders
by on Sep. 7, 2016 at 3:44 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-1):
Carpy
by Ruby Member on Sep. 7, 2016 at 3:53 PM
1 mom liked this
The conservative oppo group America Rising begins the expected debunking of Hillary Clinton’s claim to have been a great secretary of state. Tuesday, it started with Libya, arguing that “new reports in the past week show just how much this policy has unraveled. [Monday], the U.N. Security Council voted to pass a resolution expressing ‘grave concern’ with the country’s deteriorating security situation. None of the Benghazi suspects have been captured because of fears the country will further descend into chaos. The terrorist group responsible for the Benghazi attack is expanding. John Kerry issued a travel warning citing instability and violence.”

All of that is true, as was her inattentiveness to the security of our ambassador, her misleading after-attack statements, her bogus internal review and her failure to recognize the growing al-Qaeda menace in North Africa before it was too late. Still, this is sort of small potatoes in the field of Hillary debacles.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (listens to U.S. President Barack Obama speak during a meeting with members of his cabinet at the White House in Washington November 28, 2012. (REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)
Then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and President Barack Obama (Kevin Lamarque/Reuters)
Clinton, contrary to President Obama’s assertions, is not among the best secretaries of state but among the worst. If you want to be generous you can say she was an ineffective bit player in a foreign policy run out of the Oval Office. Let’s recap her tenure:

Failure to negotiate a status of forces agreement in Iraq

Premature pullout from Afghanistan without regard to consequences

Russian reset

Victory lap on Osama bin Laden giving a false impression of al-Qaeda’s decimation

Fixation on the “peace process” and obsession with Israeli settlements

The ensuing bad relationship with the Israeli government

Blindsiding the Israeli prime minister with a public declaration of U.S. policy on “1967 borders”

Backing Hugo Chavez’s candidate in Honduras rather that the middle and business classes’ choice (who was also pro-American)

Relaxation of Cuban sanctions followed by Alan Gross’s imprisonment

Surprising Poland and the Czech Republic by pulling out anti-missile sites

Embracing Hosni Mubarak (calling him a family friend) just when pressure was needed to prevent what ultimately became
his overthrow

The lack of a cogent approach to the Middle East

Trying to engage Bashar al-Assad and calling him a reformer

Failing to take decisive action in Syria before jihadists poured into the country

Downplaying human rights, especially with China

Failing to robustly support the Green Revolution

Engagement of Iran and foot-dragging on sanctions, allowing Iran to reach the cusp of a nuclear weapons capability

Announced “pivot” to Asia without carrying through

I may have missed a few, but you get the idea. These don’t account for the sins of omission — for example, the failures to initiate and complete new trade agreements, to maintain and extend productive bilateral and multilateral relationships outside the U.N. and NATO and to improve our standing in the world as she promised.

In the largest sense, Clinton was handed some national security wins (in Iraq and Afghanistan, in strong relationships with Middle East states) and frittered them away, failing to construct a sustainable and effective policy architecture for the post-Bush years.


The best and most honest defense is that she wasn’t really in charge of foreign policy; the president was. That leaves two significant problems: 1) How does she lay claim to a legacy, and 2) If she was so at odds with the president, why didn’t she leave after a couple of years to share her wisdom with the country?

It will be interesting to see what defenses she will come up with. Right now there is a powerful case to be made that she was the secretary of state during the worst period of foreign policy for at least this century and the last.
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)