The Family Piggy Bank

Planning for your family's future

Group Home

Freezing Eggs

Posted by on Mar. 29, 2013 at 3:37 PM
  • 5 Replies

 

Freezing Eggs

If you have more eggs than you can use within a few weeks of buying them, you can break them out of their shells and freeze them. Freeze only clean, fresh eggs.

Whites

Break and separate the eggs, one at a time, making sure that no yolk gets in the whites. Pour the whites into freezer containers, seal tightly, label with the number of egg whites and the date, and freeze. For faster thawing and easier measuring, first freeze each white in a standard ice cube tray. Then transfer to a freezer container.

Yolks

The gelation property of egg yolk causes it to thicken or gel when frozen, so you need to give yolks special treatment. If you freeze them as they are, egg yolks will eventually become so gelatinous that they will be almost impossible to use in a recipe. To help retard this gelation, beat in either 1/8 teaspoon salt or 1 1/2 teaspoons sugar or corn syrup per 1/4 cup of egg yolks (about 4 yolks). Label the container with the number of yolks, the date, and whether you’ve added salt (for main dishes) or sweetener (for baking or desserts). Freeze.

Whole eggs

Beat just until blended, pour into freezer containers, seal tightly, label with the number of eggs and the date, and freeze.

Hard-boiled eggs

You can freeze hard-boiled egg yolks to use later for toppings or garnishes. Carefully place the yolks in a single layer in a saucepan and add enough water to come at least 1 inch above the yolks. Cover and quickly bring just to boiling. Remove the pan from the heat and let the yolks stand, covered, in the hot water about 12 minutes. Remove the yolks with a slotted spoon, drain them well and package them for freezing.

It’s best not to freeze hard-boiled whole eggs and hard-boiled whites because they become tough and watery when frozen.

To use frozen eggs

In a home freezer, you can freeze eggs for up to one year. When you’re ready to use frozen eggs, thaw them overnight in the refrigerator or under running cold water. Use egg yolks or whole eggs as soon as they’re thawed. Thawed egg whites will beat to better volume if you allow them to sit at room temperature for about 30 minutes. Use thawed frozen eggs only in dishes that are thoroughly cooked.

46-using-frozen-eggs

 

http://www.incredibleegg.org/egg-facts/eggcyclopedia/f/freezing-eggs

by on Mar. 29, 2013 at 3:37 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-5):
TerriC
by Bronze Member on Mar. 29, 2013 at 4:12 PM

TFS.  I never knew hard boiled egg yolks could be frozen, good to know.

emilyrosenj
by Margaret on Mar. 29, 2013 at 9:13 PM

Very helpful, thank you!

charlene_kyle
by Charlene on Mar. 30, 2013 at 1:41 PM

 TFS

Godspitgrl
by on Mar. 30, 2013 at 6:02 PM
TYFS
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
eustacejessica
by Jess on Mar. 30, 2013 at 8:42 PM

TFS!

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)