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Doing the Math Behind Homeschooling

Posted by on Aug. 29, 2012 at 12:23 AM
  • 21 Replies
3 moms liked this

Doing the math behind homeschooling
August 28th, 2012
07:51 AM ET

by Carl Azuz, CNN

(CNN) - Public, private, parochial, charter schools: There's no shortage of options on where to send your children for their education.

But a growing number of Americans are choosing not to send them anywhere at all, opting instead to educate them at home.

The National Center for Education Statistics says that 1.7 percent of kids were homeschooled in 1999, 2.2 percent in 2003, and 2.9 percent in 2007. Today, that figure is at 4 percent, according to an article published at EducationNews.org.

So it appears that the homeschooling growth rate is more exponential than it is steady.

Most parents aren't certified teachers, so it stands to reason why some question the effectiveness of a homeschool education. But the Home School Legal Defense Association, an advocacy group in favor of homeschooling, reported in 2009 that homeschooled students averaged 37 percentile points higher on standardized tests than their public school counterparts.

EducationNews.org backs that up, saying that while students in traditional schools mark the 50th percentile on standardized tests, students who are “independently educated” score between the 65th and 89th percentile.

Of course, there’s a time commitment involved in homeschooling that many families simply can’t make. If a single parent has a full-time job – or if both parents do – setting aside several hours a day to educate a child simply isn’t feasible.

And the arguments against homeschooling – from varying state requirements to reduced social interaction among peers to a lack of student competition – can be challenging issues to address.

But if the number of kids who are homeschooled continues to rise, it may signal a noteworthy trend.

http://schoolsofthought.blogs.cnn.com/2012/08/28/doing-the-math-behind-homeschooling/?hpt=hp_bn1

Proud Navy Wife since 1/10/06; toddler girl Mother to McKenna since 12/11/08,  toddler girl McKaela since 5/27/10 & baby girl Maisie since 8/15/11.

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by on Aug. 29, 2012 at 12:23 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Mrs.Andrews
by on Aug. 29, 2012 at 2:45 AM

I was home schooled. I wanted to do it with my kids too. Then I realized I don't have the patience or knowledge to give my kids a really good experience. 

I was just like the statistics when I was being homeschooled. I tested way above average. But I really missed out when it came to math. My Mom didn't really know her stuff and even now I am horrible at math. I also missed out on a social life. We did do a homeschooling group but it was small and I never really made friends as a kid. 

4kidz916
by Bronze Member on Aug. 29, 2012 at 8:15 AM

The social issue is the biggest drawback I see to homeschooling.

HamBergerMama
by Stacy on Aug. 29, 2012 at 8:45 AM
1 mom liked this
I was homeschooled we will do the same. When it came to test scores my lowest was math (on the 80%) and even in the middle of nowhere I had a great social life.

I plan on co op homeschooling with my SIL, and a few other friends who's kids are all the same age
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Harris06
by Megan on Aug. 29, 2012 at 10:04 AM
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I was homeschooled up until college and I had no social problems at all. In fact, I was, and am, very social. I graduated a year ahead of my "class" and always made very good grades.

4kidz916
by Bronze Member on Aug. 29, 2012 at 1:43 PM

That's great!  I'm glad to hear success stories since I've been thinking of possibly homeschooling my 9yo.

Quoting Harris06:

I was homeschooled up until college and I had no social problems at all. In fact, I was, and am, very social. I graduated a year ahead of my "class" and always made very good grades.


Harris06
by Megan on Aug. 29, 2012 at 1:52 PM

As long as you are consistant, committed, and passionate about it than your 9yo should do just fine with it! I have always been one that my mom could give me my work to do, show me how to do it (our lesson, per se), and then leave me to do my work. My brother's, on the other hand, did better if she sat there with them, or was in the same room with them at least, while they did their work. We all had different learning styles but we all were very bright and advanced (though my brothers' seem to have lost their minds once they hit college..LOL).

Quoting 4kidz916:

That's great!  I'm glad to hear success stories since I've been thinking of possibly homeschooling my 9yo.

Quoting Harris06:

I was homeschooled up until college and I had no social problems at all. In fact, I was, and am, very social. I graduated a year ahead of my "class" and always made very good grades.



Proud Navy Wife since 1/10/06; toddler girl Mother to McKenna since 12/11/08,  toddler girl McKaela since 5/27/10 & baby girl Maisie since 8/15/11.

 Due in September? Join us in September 2011 Babies!

aneela
by on Sep. 23, 2012 at 12:18 PM

thanks for sharing this

countrygirlkat
by Member on Sep. 23, 2012 at 2:08 PM


Quoting 4kidz916:

The social issue is the biggest drawback I see to homeschooling.

That has always been our concern as well.  I think it can be done right where they get enough interaction because I have met some people who were homeschooled who have very good social skills.  I have also met many who were homeschooled who do not. 

WyledBunch
by on Sep. 23, 2012 at 10:48 PM

I homeschooled my oldest son for about five years and we both loved it. His grades improved dramatically along with his self-esteem which had been terribly low.

We turned everything into a lesson. Even a simple grocery shopping trip became a lesson where he learned not only adding, subtracting, multiplying, dividing, writing, and spelling (he wrote the list and learned his mistakes by comparing his list to the actual products), but also learned about manners, respect, and so much more just by interacting with others at the grocery store.

In fact, during one grocery shopping outing, we had met a man who lives in Korea, but was visiting family locally. He learned so much about Korea and had become so interested that it led into an entire lesson on Korea for our social studies class. Another time, he met a deaf woman and learned a little sign language and then went on to learn that at home.

When he was in public school, he was gone 8:00am until almost 4:00pm. Obviously, they weren't allowed to talk during class and they weren't allowed to talk during lunch either so that left him with 30 minutes during recess to socialize. Those 30 minutes of socialization was with kids his own age and one adult. When he was homeschooled, the amount of time he had for socialization was greatly increased and he socialized not only with children his own age, but also with children younger and older and adults of all ages. He actually became quite the social butterfly compared to the shy little boy who used to cling to my leg. Although he hated it when I referred to him as a social butterfly, he preferred "social bird". lol

I also homeschooled my daughter for a while and she enjoyed it so much that she insists that she's homeschooling her children and has already asked me to help. I'm already looking forward to that! :D


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Rushn311
by Cindy on Sep. 23, 2012 at 11:49 PM

I commend those that do, but for me, I couldn't do it. I have little to no patience.

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