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How do you teach your daughter to cope with the physical and emotional changes that come along with puberty?

Posted by on Jul. 30, 2013 at 12:07 PM
  • 111 Replies

Adolescence is a really turbulent time in which unpredictable changes accompany the emotional confusion and identity questions that come with being a young adult.


How do you teach your daughter to cope with the physical and emotional changes that come along with puberty?

confused

by on Jul. 30, 2013 at 12:07 PM
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Replies (1-10):
acrogodess
by Lissette on Jul. 30, 2013 at 12:07 PM
1 mom liked this

Honestly, she is very lucky in that we have a good line of communication open between us. I've already explained to her about the changes that come along with her budding and spotting. Sometimes she is quite moody, but she knows she is welcome to explain that she is hormonal. LOL. None of us will make it an issue. She comes to me with any questions. Sometimes, I wonder if maybe I have been too open with her. She tried to show me that she was getting "hair down there" and I laughed and shooed her away and told her I would take her word for it. LOL

Heidi615
by New Member on Jul. 30, 2013 at 12:07 PM

I honestly think it helped her by me starting early with the conversations about puberty. We were totally prepared and it has been a easy transition into womenhood. We talked about what to expect and any question asked I answered best I could. It's all about being open and honest. We also talked with our family physician too. 


5forjulie
by on Jul. 30, 2013 at 12:07 PM

I do have some one on one time to discuss puberty and all the changes that occur within our bodies. I hope I did the best to explain all that happens , and with mood swings and wanting chocolate. Yes I do share my stories of when I was going through it , and to make her understand that everyone goes through this. Only swimming when she was on her period & it was very heavy. I am trying to make sure that she know that exercise is important , and that being healthy is a very good thing. I have an open door policy with all my girls. 

jujubear1
by New Member on Jul. 30, 2013 at 12:07 PM
We haven't had to deal too much with that. I have noticed her attitude is worse at times and from reading on here, that is a sign of things to come lol. We have a good relationship where she tells me everything, even some things I wish she wouldn't lol. I answer her questions as best I can and as many times as I need to.
M4LG5
by on Jul. 30, 2013 at 12:07 PM
3 moms liked this

We are the same way.  We talk it out so that it's easier for her to understand how normal it is.  My 10 year old is quite moody (especially with her dad) but we tell her that it's okay for her to have emotions but she absolutely needs to work on being respectful no matter what.  If she needs time, it's okay to go to her room, talk to me, write it out, etc. 

Quoting acrogodess:

Honestly, she is very lucky in that we have a good line of communication open between us. I've already explained to her about the changes that come along with her budding and spotting. Sometimes she is quite moody, but she knows she is welcome to explain that she is hormonal. LOL. None of us will make it an issue. She comes to me with any questions. Sometimes, I wonder if maybe I have been too open with her. She tried to show me that she was getting "hair down there" and I laughed and shooed her away and told her I would take her word for it. LOL


romalove
by Member on Jul. 30, 2013 at 12:07 PM
4 moms liked this

From infancy, I have always talked to my kids about everything.  I don't believe in "a talk" but in a lifetime of open communication.  My kids know that they can count on me, always.  I may not like what they say, I may get mad, but I love them and always will and mad or not will help them as they need me.

Puberty is no different.  We talked about babies and sex and the changes that happen to children as they get older and start to prepare for being adults.  Because there was always the conversation, it was natural and easy, and I was able to answer questions as they came up. 

Of course, sometimes the outcome of that is that I hear things I may not wish to hear.  My daughter is now 17, and while she is not sexually active, I can tell she is contemplating becoming so at some point in the future.  She is now asking questions about how you know you're ready for sex, and discussing her friend's experiences.  This scares the heck out of me, but the truth is, I'd rather her be comfortable to discuss such things than not.  At least this way I can give guidance and input.

daerca574
by on Jul. 30, 2013 at 12:07 PM

 we talk about everything.  from the time she was little, we have always had an open communication.  I was really dredding the day when she started mestrating, but since we had openly talked about it previously, it was no big deal to her.  She does get moody and we still have lots of discussions about growing up.  For the most part I believe tht good strong communication is key in helping her deal with physical and emotional changes.

acrogodess
by Lissette on Jul. 30, 2013 at 12:07 PM

Yeah, respect is a big thing here at home and when I see other kids misbehave when out and about with Olivia, I look at her and tell her, "What would I do to you if you behaved that way with daddy or I?" and she shakes her head vigorously and says, "Uh-uh. No way. I'd be killed!" and I smile and she laughs. Lol.

Quoting M4LG5:

We are the same way.  We talk it out so that it's easier for her to understand how normal it is.  My 10 year old is quite moody (especially with her dad) but we tell her that it's okay for her to have emotions but she absolutely needs to work on being respectful no matter what.  If she needs time, it's okay to go to her room, talk to me, write it out, etc. 

Quoting acrogodess:

Honestly, she is very lucky in that we have a good line of communication open between us. I've already explained to her about the changes that come along with her budding and spotting. Sometimes she is quite moody, but she knows she is welcome to explain that she is hormonal. LOL. None of us will make it an issue. She comes to me with any questions. Sometimes, I wonder if maybe I have been too open with her. She tried to show me that she was getting "hair down there" and I laughed and shooed her away and told her I would take her word for it. LOL



Trixi.VonLace
by on Jul. 30, 2013 at 12:07 PM
When dd got her period for the first time she already knew what to do. We have been talking about the changes her body would go through for a while. I told her she could talk to me about any of the changes she was experiencing and I told her they were all normal but could be confusing and it was ok to feel confused or unsure about it. I made sure to give her all the facts and shared with her my experiences. We also talked about modesty with her changing body and I explained why that was important.
roseandlove
by New Member on Jul. 30, 2013 at 12:07 PM

My daughter is only 8 and i will wait until she starts budding out top or show some signs and then i will talk to her about stuff.

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