Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

New Hampshire Moms New Hampshire Moms

Alcohol abuse, business in nh

Posted by on Feb. 10, 2013 at 5:41 PM
  • 9 Replies
Anyone read this article or see it on the news? I was shocked


http://www.fosters.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20130127/GJOPINION_0102/130129557/-1/FOSOPINION
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
by on Feb. 10, 2013 at 5:41 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-9):
jennient3
by Jennie on Feb. 10, 2013 at 9:00 PM
I am mobile.
Can't read
Can someone make it clicky please :)
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
rosemagic01
by Holli on Feb. 10, 2013 at 9:14 PM

New Hampshire alcohol revenue comes with high costs

By Tym Rourke
Sunday, January 27, 2013



New Hampshire sells more alcohol per capita than any other state in the country and is proud of it. The New Hampshire Liquor Commission touts its “brand” — New Hampshire sells cheap alcohol — and aggressively markets this brand through sophisticated advertising. As a result, the sale of alcohol contributes more revenue per capita to the State’s General Fund than any other state. In fact, revenue from the sale of alcohol is New Hampshire’s fourth largest revenue source. However, this success comes with high costs, especially for the business sector.

A recently released report by economist Brian Gottlob of PolEcon Research found that the cost associated with excessive alcohol consumption (binge drinking, heavy drinking, underage drinking, and drinking by pregnant women) in New Hampshire is $1.15 billion per year and that about two thirds of that cost, over $756 million, is borne by New Hampshire businesses as a result of lost worker productivity.

In addition to the impact on business, excessive alcohol consumption results in increased health care, public safety and criminal justice, and other costs totaling over $390 million. This includes medical expenditures, especially hospital charges, for diagnoses caused by alcohol; costs associated with treatment for excess alcohol consumption; the costs of policing and prosecuting alcohol-related crimes; incarceration costs for those convicted of alcohol-related crimes; and the costs associated with alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes. 

Of the total $1.15 billion in costs each year, $824 million is borne by the private sector and $251 million is borne by state and local governments.

The business sector should be particularly concerned about the findings in the Gottlob report. Individuals who work less, produce less and earn less because of excessive alcohol consumption represent a waste of human resources. Due to a slowing of population growth and fewer people moving to New Hampshire, human resources are becoming scarcer in New Hampshire. If New Hampshire wants to maximize the performance of its economy, it cannot afford to waste human resources. The gravity of the impact of excessive alcohol consumption on New Hampshire’s economy was underscored in Gottlob’s conclusion: “[A]lcohol treatment and prevention is likely to have a greater long-term economic impact than nearly all other strategies to improve the performance of the New Hampshire economy.”

During her recent inaugural address, Gov. Maggie Hassan said, “There are some things that government must do, not only to help our most vulnerable citizens, but also to provide the platform for economic growth.” Ensuring access to alcohol treatment and prevention services is one of the things government must do if it wants to improve the performance of New Hampshire’s economy. 

Under existing law, a small percentage of profits from the sale of alcohol in New Hampshire is required to be used for alcohol prevention and treatment services. Each year state budget writers suspend this law and use some of the dedicated profits for other purposes. The law recognizes that a state that not only sells alcohol but also aggressively markets it has a responsibility to deal with the problems that result.

For the health of New Hampshire’s workforce and the New Hampshire business community, we urge the Governor and Legislature to make the right decision — act to ensure the formula for funding prevention and treatment services is not suspended.

Tym Rourke is the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation director of programs and chair of the Governor’s Commission on Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Prevention, Intervention and Treatment 

rosemagic01
by Holli on Feb. 10, 2013 at 9:18 PM

I disagree that because of the cost of our alcohol is going to cause people to be lazy or whatever. They don't think about the fact that MA boarders NH where alcohol is much pricier and not available like it is in NH. Thus we have a lot of stores that get a lot of MA traffic. That accounts for a lot of sales too. Leave well enough alone. NH doesn't have a drinking problem. 

143myboys9496
by Suzzanne on Feb. 11, 2013 at 4:29 PM

 I agree about MA...the article doesn't seem to take into account MA sales..which I'm certain are pretty significant...

Quoting rosemagic01:

I disagree that because of the cost of our alcohol is going to cause people to be lazy or whatever. They don't think about the fact that MA boarders NH where alcohol is much pricier and not available like it is in NH. Thus we have a lot of stores that get a lot of MA traffic. That accounts for a lot of sales too. Leave well enough alone. NH doesn't have a drinking problem. 

 

fullxbusymom
by Member on Feb. 12, 2013 at 9:41 AM

Yes people from all surrounding states also come to NH to purchase alcohol ME is huge and so is MA.  It makes sense since we have no sales tax and prices are cheaper.  Also a lot of our cigarette sales are from out of staters as well.  Because our cigarettes are almost half of what other states charge. 

RMT1995
by Bronze Member on Feb. 12, 2013 at 9:56 AM

I can vouch for that ... as a rebellious teenager and twenty-something, friends and I would regularly travel to NH on a Sunday because MA didn't sell LOL

jennient3
by Jennie on Feb. 12, 2013 at 1:58 PM

I think they are giving Nh a bad name

soooo many purchase here

my father loves crown royal, and is a collector, he buys several everytime he is here, cause its nearly half the price

lasombrs
by Sara on Feb. 13, 2013 at 7:17 AM

While I think we sell a lot I also think a lot of sales is from people from VT ME and MA coming into NH.

I am a little skeptical on the amount of work productivity missed. I don't think cost plays a part of that. Acholohism may, but they would drink the same amount and find a way to fund it no matter what.

Beer and liquior is even more readily available in FL and they actually have drive through stores!!! I saw a lot more drunks in the st in FL then i ever have in NH.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN