Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Colorado Moms Colorado Moms

Your Daily Recipe, 24 Aug

Posted by on Aug. 24, 2012 at 10:04 AM
  • 9 Replies

Again, not mine.  But, with some modifications, this is what I'm doing for dinner tonight.  I LOVE tagines and I just picked up some lamb last night (at Costco, got a funny story to post about that) so this is just about perfect.


Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 2 pounds lamb meat, cut into 1 1/2 inch cubes
  • 2 teaspoons paprika
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 pinch saffron
  • 3/4 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 2 medium onions, cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 5 carrots, peeled, cut into fourths, then sliced lengthwise into thin strips
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger
  • 1 lemon, zested
  • 1 (14.5 ounce) can homemade chicken broth or low-sodium canned broth
  • 1 tablespoon sun-dried tomato paste
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon water (optional)

Directions

  1. Place diced lamb in a bowl, toss with 2 tablespoons of the olive oil, and set aside. In a large resealable bag, toss together the paprika, turmeric, cumin, cayenne, cinnamon, cloves, cardamom, salt, ginger, saffron, garlic powder, and coriander; mix well. Add the lamb to the bag, and toss around to coat well. Refrigerate at least 8 hours, preferably overnight.
  2. Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a large, heavy bottomed pot over medium-high heat. Add 1/3 of the lamb, and brown well. Remove to a plate, and repeat with remaining lamb. Add onions and carrots to the pot and cook for 5 minutes. Stir in the fresh garlic and ginger; continue cooking for an additional 5 minutes. Return the lamb to the pot and stir in the lemon zest, chicken broth, tomato paste, and honey. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer for 1 1/2 to 2 hours, stirring occasionally, until the meat is tender.
  3. If the consistency of the tagine is too thin, you may thicken it with a mixture of cornstarch and water during the last 5 minutes.
"I am only one, but I am still one; I cannot do everything, but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything I will not refuse to do the something that I can do." ~~ Edward Everett Hale 1822-1909
by on Aug. 24, 2012 at 10:04 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-9):
eema.gray
by on Aug. 24, 2012 at 10:07 AM

My modifications:  I don't have ground ginger so I'm using a little bit of fresh; out of saffron so I'll just use about 1/2 t tumeric instead; don't use garlic powder, I'll use probably 5 or 6 cloves fresh; for vegetables, I'm using fresh tomatoes, zucchini, and spinach; homemade chicken stock; and I won't thicken with cornstarch.  The last 30 minutes or so, I'll simmer the pot on high with the lid off so the sauce can reduce.

Oh, and I'm adding a mix of prunes, fresh peaches, and pecans as well.  :-)

countrygirlkat
by Kathleen on Aug. 24, 2012 at 10:59 AM

I have only had lamb meat once.  It was good but I have always been afraid to cook it for myself!

eema.gray
by on Aug. 24, 2012 at 11:03 AM

It's really no different from any other red meat, except that it cooks a little faster than corn-fed beef.   Meat from animals raised on grass cooks somewhat faster because it doesn't have as much marbled fat in it as the corn-fed stuff.   Lamb is ALWAYS 100% pastured because sheep have a tendency to die before reaching market weight when they're fed on even supplemental grain.  Which is also one of the reasons lamb has a "high" price tag compared with corn-fed beef - it takes a lot longer for a young sheep (lambs are usually sold for market at about 18 months age) to reach market weight on grass compared to a beef steer on corn who can reach market weight in about 9 to 12 months.

Quoting countrygirlkat:

I have only had lamb meat once.  It was good but I have always been afraid to cook it for myself!


"I am only one, but I am still one; I cannot do everything, but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything I will not refuse to do the something that I can do." ~~ Edward Everett Hale 1822-1909
Bradensmommy719
by Anji on Aug. 24, 2012 at 11:11 AM
Yum! i dont cook a lot of lamb, one cuz the price and two i dont have a recipe base for it.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
eema.gray
by on Aug. 24, 2012 at 11:14 AM

Pretty much, what you can do to beef, you can do to lamb.  :-)

I look at the cost this way:  The cost of corn-fed beef is unnaturally low because of a host of farm subsidies.  When I buy a $23 leg of lamb, I'm looking at the "true" cost of raising an animal to market weight; because sheep digestion is primitive enough it can't handle grain and a feedlot.  Since the sheep doesn't go to a feedlot, more of the money for that sheep goes directly to the rancher.

Quoting Bradensmommy719:

Yum! i dont cook a lot of lamb, one cuz the price and two i dont have a recipe base for it.


"I am only one, but I am still one; I cannot do everything, but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything I will not refuse to do the something that I can do." ~~ Edward Everett Hale 1822-1909
flowerfunleah
by Leah on Aug. 24, 2012 at 11:16 AM

Looks easy enough! Does it have to be lam?

eema.gray
by on Aug. 24, 2012 at 11:18 AM

Oh noz, not at all.  :-)  You could use beef, chicken, goat, you could also do this with a couple cups of soaked chickpeas and more veggies.  

Quoting flowerfunleah:

Looks easy enough! Does it have to be lam?


"I am only one, but I am still one; I cannot do everything, but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything I will not refuse to do the something that I can do." ~~ Edward Everett Hale 1822-1909
flowerfunleah
by Leah on Aug. 24, 2012 at 11:21 AM

Ooh good! We're gonna be in the Springs and it's an opportunity to go to Ranch Foods for some beef tips.

Quoting eema.gray:

Oh noz, not at all.  :-)  You could use beef, chicken, goat, you could also do this with a couple cups of soaked chickpeas and more veggies.  

Quoting flowerfunleah:

Looks easy enough! Does it have to be lam?



Bradensmommy719
by Anji on Aug. 24, 2012 at 11:29 AM
Oh i get that. But i havea $200 limit to spend on food every month so i cant buy the expensive meats. I would never make it through the month.

Quoting eema.gray:

Pretty much, what you can do to beef, you can do to lamb.  :-)

I look at the cost this way:  The cost of corn-fed beef is unnaturally low because of a host of farm subsidies.  When I buy a $23 leg of lamb, I'm looking at the "true" cost of raising an animal to market weight; because sheep digestion is primitive enough it can't handle grain and a feedlot.  Since the sheep doesn't go to a feedlot, more of the money for that sheep goes directly to the rancher.


Quoting Bradensmommy719:

Yum! i dont cook a lot of lamb, one cuz the price and two i dont have a recipe base for it.


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)