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I saw this picture on FB (health care coverage)

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Do you support "ObamaCare"?  

by on Oct. 11, 2012 at 3:26 PM
Replies (21-25):
celestegood
by on Oct. 18, 2012 at 11:06 AM
Agree.

Quoting AmyG1976:

 YES I do and I dont have a preexisting condition and I have great ins though dh union so I dont support for bias reasons  I support it because its right

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
celestegood
by on Oct. 18, 2012 at 11:07 AM
Good for you. You are a wonderful friend.

Quoting AmyG1976:

my eggs are being donated to a friend to go into another friend so first and her dh can have a baby after loosing her organs to overian cancer. my neighbore has been just placed on hospice care after fighting overian cancer for 17 yrs. I do not support honering  ppl on beating and the such as to me that makes those that didnt win there battle seem like less or they didnt try hard enough. of course being happy for them but not look she won she beat it or the recent hair place by me offering free haircuts to those that beat and won out over cancer  just sounds crappy to me.    :(  I know the color I see it everyday my neighbores dh has it tattooed on his leg and they have ribbens on their cars.


Quoting heydooney:


I <3 you. My grandma died from ovarian cancer (it's teal, btw). My mom had a heart attack at age 48 even though she was the healthiest person, thin, never smoked or drank, and almost a vegetarian. Heart disease kills roughly SIX TIMES more women than breast cancer annually. Pink is a racket. If I'm planning on buying something and there's a pink ribbon on it, I usually pass.


And another thing! Screw "awareness," everyone is AWARE of breast cancer. Don't effing raise money for breast cancer awareness, it does $%^ for those suffering, who NEED a cure, they don't NEED people to be "aware" of it.


Then there are the possible cures that the FDA shut down because they aren't profitable enough... I could go on all day. But that's another post ;)


Quoting mom2jessnky:


It's good, I just wish (and this is unrelated to Obamacare to be clear) that other cancers got some attention. Breast Cancer is NOT the only cancer out there, but considering the attention it gets you'd think it was super common and the only thing to worry about.


My step mom died from Cervical Cancer. When she was diagnosed you know what someone said to me? "Oh that's not a big deal."  Like I was wasting time even worrying about it. Funny...something that wasn't a big deal killed her. Go figure.


Quick, without Googling, what's the ribbon color for Cervical/Ovarian Cancer? Childhood Cancer? Leukemia/Lymphoma? Most people don't know, and also don't know there are campaigns for them.








 

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Greekmama21
by on Oct. 18, 2012 at 11:56 AM

I have a few reasons why I don't believe in the short term at least it will make a difference. Again, you are shocking the market by forcing new preventive care (which should have always been covered), you are now forcing companies to take higer risk patients and lastly you are raising the coverage amount making companies forego the costs of riders they had previously. Lastly, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) recently admitted there would be more uninsured people than previously thought because the economy has been slow to recover. 

1. There are loop holes which exempt people from buying insurance. It's based on the cost of buying insurance in your area AND your income. Therefore, a young adult in college, while their parents can cover them may choose not to because they are so low risk. With the economy in it's current state I don't believe young adults on student loans are getting much help from mom and dad with insurance costs. 

Young adults who opted not to go to college for whatever reason: many will still fall under the income requirements. 

Young adults who are underemployed or unemployed following college; The least of their concerns will be buying health insurance if they have student loans and normal COL expenses. 

2. With the new regulations we discovered if our insurance company overpays our provider, we will be responsible to pay them back. Many people in the past have negotiated health care costs rather than going through insurance companies, the hospital I worked for was more than happy to have people do this and would give people great rates for a few reasons. They bill your insurance which could deny the treatment and they have to wait for their money from you (which may never come) because of out of pocket deductibles- many times $500 which the cost of an ER visit or family Dr. exam would be less. You paying up front they are guaranteed the money AND now it benefits you more because you wont get an unexpected bill. For low risk adults this is a great way to go for your yearly visits. Hospitals will generally negotiate ALL debts for uninsured patients at a better rate than for insured patients because they want your money! Many Dr.'s do this as well because they get their money now as opposed to later when you may not have it because of emergencies. Cut me a deal today and you get your money. We've always done this because we can then submit the bill to our insurance so they know we put money toward our OOP expenses. 

3. There is an arbitrary lifetime amount of coverage people generally get. Lex nearly maxed hers during her NICU stay- our policy was 500K dollars so we would have to pay everything difference wise if she went over until we could add a rider. Now, most companies are offering a 750K lifetime max. It's additional coverage most people don't need. Those who do max it- micro preemies, cancer patients, those with disabilities are still running the risk of needing to purchase riders in the future. 

Quoting celestegood:

How so?
If more people were insured, more are paying for insurance. The more money that comes into the system, the more money the company has to cover treatments for said insured.
Younger people use insurance less, as well as very healthy people. If you think about it, this will bring down costs for all.


Quoting Greekmama21:

I do support it without the tax if people can't afford it. I LOVE how the government says what people can afford. If someone had student loans, car payment, housing and normal COL adjustments I don't see how they can say now you, a young 27 year old male MUST buy health insurance. 

Don't worry... I know health insurance is expensive but the costs will go down while we insure higher risk people and are mandated at covering more treatments, etc... Don't worry though, costs will go down. NO... It doesn't work that way. 


celestegood
by on Oct. 18, 2012 at 12:10 PM

 I think we need to look at the long term here, not the short term.

Although I disagree with some of your points, I respect your opinion.

Quoting Greekmama21:

I have a few reasons why I don't believe in the short term at least it will make a difference. Again, you are shocking the market by forcing new preventive care (which should have always been covered), you are now forcing companies to take higer risk patients and lastly you are raising the coverage amount making companies forego the costs of riders they had previously. Lastly, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) recently admitted there would be more uninsured people than previously thought because the economy has been slow to recover. 

1. There are loop holes which exempt people from buying insurance. It's based on the cost of buying insurance in your area AND your income. Therefore, a young adult in college, while their parents can cover them may choose not to because they are so low risk. With the economy in it's current state I don't believe young adults on student loans are getting much help from mom and dad with insurance costs. 

Young adults who opted not to go to college for whatever reason: many will still fall under the income requirements. 

Young adults who are underemployed or unemployed following college; The least of their concerns will be buying health insurance if they have student loans and normal COL expenses. 

2. With the new regulations we discovered if our insurance company overpays our provider, we will be responsible to pay them back. Many people in the past have negotiated health care costs rather than going through insurance companies, the hospital I worked for was more than happy to have people do this and would give people great rates for a few reasons. They bill your insurance which could deny the treatment and they have to wait for their money from you (which may never come) because of out of pocket deductibles- many times $500 which the cost of an ER visit or family Dr. exam would be less. You paying up front they are guaranteed the money AND now it benefits you more because you wont get an unexpected bill. For low risk adults this is a great way to go for your yearly visits. Hospitals will generally negotiate ALL debts for uninsured patients at a better rate than for insured patients because they want your money! Many Dr.'s do this as well because they get their money now as opposed to later when you may not have it because of emergencies. Cut me a deal today and you get your money. We've always done this because we can then submit the bill to our insurance so they know we put money toward our OOP expenses. 

3. There is an arbitrary lifetime amount of coverage people generally get. Lex nearly maxed hers during her NICU stay- our policy was 500K dollars so we would have to pay everything difference wise if she went over until we could add a rider. Now, most companies are offering a 750K lifetime max. It's additional coverage most people don't need. Those who do max it- micro preemies, cancer patients, those with disabilities are still running the risk of needing to purchase riders in the future. 

Quoting celestegood:

How so?
If more people were insured, more are paying for insurance. The more money that comes into the system, the more money the company has to cover treatments for said insured.
Younger people use insurance less, as well as very healthy people. If you think about it, this will bring down costs for all.


Quoting Greekmama21:

I do support it without the tax if people can't afford it. I LOVE how the government says what people can afford. If someone had student loans, car payment, housing and normal COL adjustments I don't see how they can say now you, a young 27 year old male MUST buy health insurance. 

Don't worry... I know health insurance is expensive but the costs will go down while we insure higher risk people and are mandated at covering more treatments, etc... Don't worry though, costs will go down. NO... It doesn't work that way. 

 

 

Greekmama21
by on Oct. 18, 2012 at 12:17 PM

The reason I look at it in the short term is because it is NOT a guarantee. Romney has said he would overturn it, Gary Johnson would most likely overturn it. I believe it's here for the next four years because I think Obama will be in office but I'm being a realist, many people dislike it and because it's only a law, not an ammendment to the constitution it can be overturned at any point in the future. 

Quoting celestegood:

 I think we need to look at the long term here, not the short term.

Although I disagree with some of your points, I respect your opinion.

Quoting Greekmama21:

I have a few reasons why I don't believe in the short term at least it will make a difference. Again, you are shocking the market by forcing new preventive care (which should have always been covered), you are now forcing companies to take higer risk patients and lastly you are raising the coverage amount making companies forego the costs of riders they had previously. Lastly, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) recently admitted there would be more uninsured people than previously thought because the economy has been slow to recover. 

1. There are loop holes which exempt people from buying insurance. It's based on the cost of buying insurance in your area AND your income. Therefore, a young adult in college, while their parents can cover them may choose not to because they are so low risk. With the economy in it's current state I don't believe young adults on student loans are getting much help from mom and dad with insurance costs. 

Young adults who opted not to go to college for whatever reason: many will still fall under the income requirements. 

Young adults who are underemployed or unemployed following college; The least of their concerns will be buying health insurance if they have student loans and normal COL expenses. 

2. With the new regulations we discovered if our insurance company overpays our provider, we will be responsible to pay them back. Many people in the past have negotiated health care costs rather than going through insurance companies, the hospital I worked for was more than happy to have people do this and would give people great rates for a few reasons. They bill your insurance which could deny the treatment and they have to wait for their money from you (which may never come) because of out of pocket deductibles- many times $500 which the cost of an ER visit or family Dr. exam would be less. You paying up front they are guaranteed the money AND now it benefits you more because you wont get an unexpected bill. For low risk adults this is a great way to go for your yearly visits. Hospitals will generally negotiate ALL debts for uninsured patients at a better rate than for insured patients because they want your money! Many Dr.'s do this as well because they get their money now as opposed to later when you may not have it because of emergencies. Cut me a deal today and you get your money. We've always done this because we can then submit the bill to our insurance so they know we put money toward our OOP expenses. 

3. There is an arbitrary lifetime amount of coverage people generally get. Lex nearly maxed hers during her NICU stay- our policy was 500K dollars so we would have to pay everything difference wise if she went over until we could add a rider. Now, most companies are offering a 750K lifetime max. It's additional coverage most people don't need. Those who do max it- micro preemies, cancer patients, those with disabilities are still running the risk of needing to purchase riders in the future. 

Quoting celestegood:

How so?
If more people were insured, more are paying for insurance. The more money that comes into the system, the more money the company has to cover treatments for said insured.
Younger people use insurance less, as well as very healthy people. If you think about it, this will bring down costs for all.


Quoting Greekmama21:

I do support it without the tax if people can't afford it. I LOVE how the government says what people can afford. If someone had student loans, car payment, housing and normal COL adjustments I don't see how they can say now you, a young 27 year old male MUST buy health insurance. 

Don't worry... I know health insurance is expensive but the costs will go down while we insure higher risk people and are mandated at covering more treatments, etc... Don't worry though, costs will go down. NO... It doesn't work that way. 


 


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