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Mistletoe

Posted by on Nov. 30, 2012 at 9:29 AM
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Witch of the Old World Herbs 
Mistletoe
*Considered Poison

Mistletoe is and ancient and awesome herb that is held my witches for its extremely powerful magick and even in-worlders respect its power for love during the Yule/Christmas holidays. 


Harvesting Mistletoe with my Great Grandmother was always great fun for me. I tended to be a bit of a tomboy and gathering Mistletoe allowed me to use my aptitude for climbing trees. 

If you have ever seen Mistletoe growing it seems to always affixes itself to the highest branches of the trees. My job was to carefully climb the tree under the watchful directions of my Great Grandmother and break off the Mistletoe for its lofty protective branch and drop it carefully into my Great Grandmothers long skirt as she held it widely spread like a net.

Folk Names; Witches Broom, Witch Herb, Devils Fuge, Holy Wood, Druids Herb and Thunderbesem. 

Magickal Powers; Love, Luck, Protection, Fertility, Exorcism, Health and Hunting.

Mistletoe is hung above doorways to catch a kiss from those whom pass unsuspectingly under where it hangs. The one you have been kissed under the Mistletoe the one you kiss will be your love true throughout all eternity.

Mistletoe and Mistletoe wood is made or carved into charms to assure luck when hunting. Although I believe that was more for when hunting was necessary for survival and not killing for the so-called sport. Charms are also made of Mistletoe to bring luck protection.

Mistletoe when placed under a bed filled with love will assure the couple will conceive a child. When done during full Moons the child will have light hair and dark Moons mean the child will have dark hair. Mistletoe can also be burned in added to spells for fertility. It is also carried as and ancient fertility symbol.

Mistletoe is good to strengthen all magickal powers and magickal working of any kind. Also because Mistletoe is an evergreen plant it is used in healing magick and spells for youth.

Medical Uses; Heart Problems, Strengthen Capillarity Walls and the Immune System. 

Mistletoe made into a mild tonic is use for the heart and to lower blood pressure it will also slow the hearts rate. Mistletoe is also used in infusion and tonics to strengthen the capillary walls. 

Mistletoe infusions and teas are used to stimulate the immune systems and work to inhibit the growth of some tumors. 

Other; Mistletoe is toxic in large amounts and should be used with care.

Author Lady Abigail Copyright © 12312011
by on Nov. 30, 2012 at 9:29 AM
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oxMichelexo
by Keeper of the Book on Dec. 1, 2012 at 1:29 PM

Yule/Christmas Lore & Traditions: Mistletoe

The curious--and sometimes delightful--custom of kissing under the mistletoe has its origins in our ancestors’ belief that this parasitic plant conferred powers of fertility and vitality. In medieval times, women wrapped mistletoe around their waist and wrists to boost their chances of conceiving. Mistletoe’s reputation as a magical life force arose from the fact that the plant, which grows at the top of apple trees, is able to live through the harshest of winters and still produce fruit. Its ability to reproduce and grow without roots in the ground added to its mystical aura.

Scandinavian legend reveals how mistletoe ended up at the top of trees: Frigga, Norse goddess of love and beauty and wife of Odin, banished the mistletoe to the forest canopy after her son, Balder the Beautiful, was killed by a dart made from its wood. When Balder came back to life, Frigga made mistletoe a symbol of love and eternal life.
Yule/Christmas Lore & Traditions: Mistletoe
The curious--and sometimes delightful--custom of kissing under the mistletoe has its origins in our ancestors’ belief that this parasitic plant conferred powers of fertility and vitality. In medieval times, women wrapped mistletoe around their waist and wrists to boost their chances of conceiving. Mistletoe’s reputation as a magical life force arose from the fact that the plant, which grows at the top of apple trees, is able to live through the harshest of winters and still produce fruit. Its ability to reproduce and grow without roots in the ground added to its mystical aura.
Scandinavian legend reveals how mistletoe ended up at the top of trees: Frigga, Norse goddess of love and beauty and wife of Odin, banished the mistletoe to the forest canopy after her son, Balder the Beautiful, was killed by a dart made from its wood. When Balder came back to life, Frigga made mistletoe a symbol of love and eternal life.
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