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No wonder a lot of people don't believe it when a parent says their kid has special needs

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 38 Replies

I have a kid with special needs.  Sensory processing disorder, anxiety, and likely autism but they can't make up their minds.  So I'm part of this sensory processing group on facebook.  Some of the moms on there are crazy!

"My 1 month old is undiagnosed but I'm sure she has SPD.  She is a seeker and will only sleep swaddled while I hold her."  Ummm... it's called a newborn!

"My 3 year old is undiagnosed but I know he has SPD.  He's always on the go!"  Yes, that's a preschooler.

And the real kicker...

"How do I go about getting my baby diagnosed with and therapy for SPD?  I know he has it.  He's due in 2 months and is always moving.  Anytime they do an ultrasound his hands are over his ears.  I've never had to deal with special needs before.  Help!"

Now I can look back and say my son had signs as a young baby.  He did not like being held close or swaddled, he wanted his space.  He would SCREAM if he heard the sound of Elmo's voice.  He was always very cautious and would not do physical things until he knew he could do it without falling (like walking he walked across the room and fell so he didn't try again for months).  But I never even considered getting him a diagnosis at such a young age much less before he was ever born!

Posted by Anonymous on May. 5, 2013 at 1:27 PM
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Replies (1-10):
kenleespice
by on May. 5, 2013 at 10:05 PM

my 4 year old has sensory issues  and autistic.he hasnt been tested yet but I know.i have a autistic teen plus im autistic so I know  the sighns  but yea it is way over dx

Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on May. 5, 2013 at 10:11 PM
I guess it has become the diagnosis du jour for some.
reava
by on May. 5, 2013 at 11:09 PM
I don't understand why someone would want their child to have special needs. Do they understand the challenges of having a child with special needs? Do they understand what the child goes through? People are dumb.
Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on May. 5, 2013 at 11:14 PM
I don't either. They seem to think it's some cool club to belong to or a status symbol or something. It's not! It's a huge challenge. It involves love, patience, and tons of therapy.


Quoting reava:

I don't understand why someone would want their child to have special needs. Do they understand the challenges of having a child with special needs? Do they understand what the child goes through? People are dumb.

MamaAjax
by Bronze Member on May. 5, 2013 at 11:22 PM
1 mom liked this

I feel this way about several issues. I'm Schizoaffective Bi-polar.

No one thought to diagnose me when I was talking with my "imaginary" friends. no one thought to diagnose me even when I was flat lining my heart and in and out of mental hopsitals from the age of 10 +

A in home therapist pegged it, mainly cause he has seen once case similar to mine. (I was on house arrest for assulting another student and placing them in the hospital. Random rage ftw!)

Now days I hear it so much. "Oh I'm bi-polar." and it's like ummm no... You're a spoiled ass teenager.

Or "I'm moody I think I'm bi-polar." and it's like "That phone that just rang and interrupted what you were doing... did you have to explain to yourself all the horrible consquences of shatter that -insert string of foul language- would have, just so you don't break it?" No? I didn't think so... Moody isn't bi-polar...uncontrollable moods for no real vaild logical reason is.

Either everyone laughs about it and it's the butt of jokes or they're bragging that they have it, but it just floors me.

1.) who the hell would want to live this way? I have to live every day of my life talking myself out of behaviors, explaining to my self the consquences. I have to constantly battle myself inside my mind, which is normally racing 90 miles a freaking minute and makes an ADHD kid seem calm. I even have to control my speech to make sure it isn't pressured.

2.) It's not funny, people with this crap are disabled. It is an offically recongized disability.

ugh. >.< I feel your pain.


Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on May. 5, 2013 at 11:26 PM

I'm sorry you have to deal with that :(  My in-laws self diagnose all of the kids and it's terrible!  My nephew was diagnosed schizophrenic by a doctor and is doing well.  My niece uses her ADHD to get out of everyhing.  "Oh, it's just my ADHD I can't do that."  Drives me crazy!  A doctor didn't even diagnose her, her mom did!

Quoting MamaAjax:

I feel this way about several issues. I'm Schizoaffective Bi-polar.

No one thought to diagnose me when I was talking with my "imaginary" friends. no one thought to diagnose me even when I was flat lining my heart and in and out of mental hopsitals from the age of 10 +

A in home therapist pegged it, mainly cause he has seen once case similar to mine. (I was on house arrest for assulting another student and placing them in the hospital. Random rage ftw!)

Now days I hear it so much. "Oh I'm bi-polar." and it's like ummm no... You're a spoiled ass teenager.

Or "I'm moody I think I'm bi-polar." and it's like "That phone that just rang and interrupted what you were doing... did you have to explain to yourself all the horrible consquences of shatter that -insert string of foul language- would have, just so you don't break it?" No? I didn't think so... Moody isn't bi-polar...uncontrollable moods for no real vaild logical reason is.

Either everyone laughs about it and it's the butt of jokes or they're bragging that they have it, but it just floors me.

1.) who the hell would want to live this way? I have to live every day of my life talking myself out of behaviors, explaining to my self the consquences. I have to constantly battle myself inside my mind, which is normally racing 90 miles a freaking minute and makes an ADHD kid seem calm. I even have to control my speech to make sure it isn't pressured.

2.) It's not funny, people with this crap are disabled. It is an offically recongized disability.

ugh. >.< I feel your pain.




Mrsmayaguy
by Member on May. 6, 2013 at 12:23 AM


My heart goes out to you.  I know you don't want to live that way. I'm sorry you do.  I hope your life is better now!

Quoting MamaAjax:

I feel this way about several issues. I'm Schizoaffective Bi-polar.

No one thought to diagnose me when I was talking with my "imaginary" friends. no one thought to diagnose me even when I was flat lining my heart and in and out of mental hopsitals from the age of 10 +

A in home therapist pegged it, mainly cause he has seen once case similar to mine. (I was on house arrest for assulting another student and placing them in the hospital. Random rage ftw!)

Now days I hear it so much. "Oh I'm bi-polar." and it's like ummm no... You're a spoiled ass teenager.

Or "I'm moody I think I'm bi-polar." and it's like "That phone that just rang and interrupted what you were doing... did you have to explain to yourself all the horrible consquences of shatter that -insert string of foul language- would have, just so you don't break it?" No? I didn't think so... Moody isn't bi-polar...uncontrollable moods for no real vaild logical reason is.

Either everyone laughs about it and it's the butt of jokes or they're bragging that they have it, but it just floors me.

1.) who the hell would want to live this way? I have to live every day of my life talking myself out of behaviors, explaining to my self the consquences. I have to constantly battle myself inside my mind, which is normally racing 90 miles a freaking minute and makes an ADHD kid seem calm. I even have to control my speech to make sure it isn't pressured.

2.) It's not funny, people with this crap are disabled. It is an offically recongized disability.

ugh. >.< I feel your pain.




susan115
by Bronze Member on May. 6, 2013 at 12:56 AM

Let it go, you know the truth.

Anonymous
by Anonymous - Original Poster on May. 6, 2013 at 1:02 AM

Well of course I do.  It's more of a "I can't believe people would act like this" kind of vent than feeling like they are attacking me personally.  I feel bad for their kids who some of them are taking from doctor to doctor because they won't diagnose them like they want.  The majority on there have diagnosed kids and valid concerns.  I love talking to them because it makes me feel so much less alone.  I get some great ideas from them and it has really helped me handle my son.

But some are just crazy!


Quoting susan115:

Let it go, you know the truth.



Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on May. 6, 2013 at 2:43 PM

The more awareness there is of something, the more people see it in their kids. It's like when you take psychology 101, you start seeing mental problems in everyone you know, in your relationships and in yourself and you become convinced there is pathology everywhere just because you have a little bit of information. It's really getting out of hand. My view on getting a diagnosis is this...sometimes a child has something going on and needs extra services or therapies that you can only access if the child has a diagnosis. So in that case I can see a parent seeking one. But if the quirks or weird sensory things are just that, little quirks that don't impede development or get in the way of the child living his life, I don't see any need to get a diagnosis for it. I just don't see the benefit of having a diagnosis unless you need it to get special services. It's a crazy thought, but sometimes kids just have personality quirks or are backwards socially or a bit more sensitive to certain sounds but it doesn't need a diagnosis. Why anyone would try so hard to get one is beyond me. I know that early intervention is better than later services but diagnosing a baby in the womb of SPD is ridiculous. Every single person on the planet has SOME kind of sensory thing. They don't like certain textures of foods, they have to chew gum all of the time, the waggle their foot under the table when they sit, SOMETHING. That doesn't mean that everyone on the planet has SPD, those are just natural variations. When it is affecting he child's life and holding him back, by all means get a diagnosis. When your ultrasound is showing your baby's hands over his ears, maybe at least give him a chance to live a little to see if it is affecting him before you diagnose it yourself. Some people need to relax.

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