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any vegetarian/non cow milking mamas

Posted by on Feb. 23, 2015 at 8:46 AM
  • 6 Replies
Do you feed your baby meat? What do you do for milk at a year old? How about iron? The doctor told me I needed to give her cereal and baby meat because her iron will start to drop. I ebf until she turned six months. I given her peas avocado and sweet potato but not every day.
by on Feb. 23, 2015 at 8:46 AM
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kajira
by on Feb. 23, 2015 at 9:12 AM

I dont' do cows milk, we do almond milk, but we eat whatever except gluten.

While iron is better absorbed from heme (meat) sources, non-heme (plant) iron is better regulated causing less damage to the body. High iron foods include clams, liver, sunflower seeds, nuts, beef, lamb,beanswhole grains, dark leafy greens (spinach), dark chocolate, and tofu

kajira
by on Feb. 23, 2015 at 9:13 AM

Fruits and Vegetables High in Iron


Iron is an essential mineral used to transport oxygen to all parts of our body. A slight deficiency of iron causes anemia (fatigue/weakness), and a chronic deficiency can lead to organ failure. Conversely, too much iron leads to production of harmful free radicals, and interferes with metabolism causing damage to organs like the heart and liver. Iron which comes from fruits and vegetables is well regulated by the body, so overdose is rare and usually only occurs when people take supplements. Contrary to popular belief, fruits and vegetables can be a good source of iron, in addition, vitamin C foods, which are mostly fruits and vegetables, help increase the absorption of iron into the body. The current daily value for iron is 18 milligrams (mg). Below is a list of fruits and vegetables high in iron, for more, see the list of fruits and vegetables high in iron by nutrient density, and the extended list of iron rich fruits and vegetables.


#1: Mushrooms (Morel)

Iron 100gPer cup (66g)Per mushroom (13g)
12.18mg (68% DV)8.04mg (45% DV)1.58mg (9% DV)

Other Mushrooms High in Iron (%DV per cup): White Mushrooms, cooked (15%), Chanterelle Mushrooms (10%), Oyster Mushrooms (6%), and Shiitake Mushrooms, cooked (4%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#2: Dried Fruit (Apricots)

Iron 100gPer cup (119g)Per 1/2 cup (60g)
6.31mg (35% DV)7.51mg (42% DV)3.76mg (21% DV)

Other Dried Fruit High in Iron (%DV per cup): Peaches (36%), Prunes & Currants (26%), Raisins (24%), Pears (21%), Figs (17%), and Apples (7%). Note: Dried fruit is high in sugar and caloriesClick to see complete nutrition facts.



#3: Dark Green Leafy Vegetables (Spinach, cooked)

Iron 100gPer cup (180g)Per 1/2 cup (90g)
3.57mg (20% DV)6.43mg (36% DV)3.22mg (18% DV)

Other Dark Green Leafy Vegetables High in Iron (%DV per cup, cooked): Swiss Chard (22%), Spinach (20%), Beet Greens (15%), Scotch Kale (14%), Dandelion Greens (11%), Pak Choi (10%), and Kale (7%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#4: Olives 

Iron 100gPer super-sized olive (15g)Per jumbo olive (8g)
3.32mg (18% DV)0.5mg (3% DV)0.27mg (2% DV)

Five jumbo olives contain just 30 calories and 0.37 grams of saturated fat.Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#5: Beans & Peas (Soybeans, cooked)

Iron 100gPer cup (180g)Per 1/2 cup (90g)
2.5mg (14% DV)4.5mg (25% DV)2.25mg (13% DV)

Other Beans & Peas High in Iron (%DV per cup, cooked): Butter Beans (23%), Mange Tout (21%), Black-eyed Peas (20%), Mange Tout (18%), Green Peas (14%), Mung Beans (13%), Yellow Snap Beans (9%), and Green Snap Beans (5%).Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#6: Asparagus 

Iron 100gPer cup (134g)Per spear (20g)
2.14mg (12% DV)2.87mg (16% DV)0.43mg (2% DV)

A cup of asparagus contains just 27 calories. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#7: Berries (Mulberries)

Iron 100gPer cup (140g)Per 10 berries (15g)
1.85mg (10% DV)2.59mg (14% DV)0.28mg (2% DV)

Other Berries High in Iron (%DV per cup): Elderberries (13%), Raspberries (9%), Blackberries (7%), Strawberries (6%), Raspberries, Blackberries, Loganberries & Wild Blueberries (5%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#8: Coconut (Desiccated)

Iron 100gPer 2 oz (56g)Per ounce (28g)
3.32mg (18% DV)1.86mg (10% DV)0.93mg (5% DV)

Other Coconut Products High in Iron (%DV per ounce): Toasted Desiccated Coconut, Creamed Coconut and Coconut Milk (5%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#9: Leeks & Scallions (Leeks)

Iron 100gPer leek (89g)Per slice (6g)
2.1mg (12% DV)1.87mg (10% DV)0.13mg (1% DV)

Scallions (Spring Onions) Are Also High in Iron: with (2% DV) per onion. Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#10: Arugula (Rocket)

Iron 100gPer cup (20g)Per 1/2 cup (10g)
1.46mg (8% DV)0.3mg (2% DV)0.15mg (1% DV)

Other Salad Leaves High in Iron (%DV per cup): Butterhead Lettuce & Garden Cress (4%), Cos or Romaine Lettuce (3%), and Red Leaf Lettuce (2%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


kajira
by on Feb. 23, 2015 at 9:14 AM

#1: Mollusks (Clams, Mussels, Oysters)

Iron in 100g3oz (85g)20 Small Clams (190g)
28mg (155% DV)24mg (132% DV)53mg (295% DV)

Similar Foods High in Iron (%DV per 3oz (85g)): Oysters (57%), Cuttlefish (51%), Whelk(48%), Octopus (45%), Mussels (32%), Abalone (18%), and Scallops (14%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#2: Liver (Pork, Chicken, Turkey, Lamb, Beef)

Iron in 100g4oz Serving (113g)1 ounce (28g)
23mg (129% DV)26mg (146% DV)7mg (36% DV)

Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#3: Squash and Pumpkin Seeds

Iron in 100g1 cup (227g)1 ounce (142 seeds) (28g)
15mg (83% DV)34mg (188% DV)4mg (23% DV)

Other Seeds High in Iron (%DV per ounce (28g)): Sesame (23%), Sunflower (11%), and Flax (9%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#4: Nuts (Cashew, Pine, Hazelnut, Peanut, Almond)
Iron in 100g1 cup (129g)1 ounce (18 cashews) (28g)
6.1mg (34% DV)7.8mg (43% DV)1.7mg (9% DV)
Other Nuts High in Iron (%DV per ounce (28g)): Pine nuts(9%), Hazelnuts (7%), Peanuts (7%), Almonds (7%), Pistachios (7%), and Macadamia (6%).Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#5: Beef and Lamb (Lean Tenderloin)
Iron in 100gYield from 1lb roast (251g)3 ounce serving (85g)
3.7mg (21% DV)9.3mg (51% DV)3.1mg (17% DV)
13% DV Iron in 3oz (85g) of Lean Lamb Roast. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#6: Beans and Pulses (White Beans, Lentils)
Iron in 100g1 cup cooked (179g)1 Tablespoon (11g)
3.7mg (21% DV)6.6mg (37% DV)0.5mg (2% DV)
Other Beans High in Iron (%DV per cup cooked): Soybeans (49%), Lentils (37%), Kidney beans (29%), Garbanzo beans (Chickpeas) (26%), and Lima beans (25%), Navy (24%), Black Beans (Frijoles Negros) (20%), Pinto (20%), and Black-eyed Peas (20%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.

#7: Whole Grains, Fortified Cereals, and Bran
Iron in 100g of Quinoa1 cup of Quinoa (185g)
1.5mg (8% DV)2.8mg (15% DV)
Other Grains High in Iron (%DV per cup cooked): Oatmeal (12%), Barley (12%), Rice (11%), Bulgur (10%), Buckwheat (7%), and Millet (6%). Fortified cereals provide up to 140% DV of iron per cup. Check nutrition facts, and also be careful of the high sugar level in commercial cereals. Bran from whole grains can harm absorption of iron supplements, while whole grains are a good source of iron, they should not be consumed with iron supplementsClick to see complete nutrition facts.


#8: Dark Leafy Greens (Spinach, Swiss Chard)
Iron in 100g1 cup of Cooked Spinach (180g)
3.6mg (20% DV)6mg (36% DV)
Other Greens High in Iron (%DV per cup): Cooked Swiss Chard (22%), Cooked Turnip Greens (16%), Raw Kale (6%), and Raw Beet Greens (5%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#9: Dark Chocolate and Cocoa Powder
Iron in 100g1 cup grated (132g)1 Square (29g)
17mg (97% DV)23mg (128% DV)5mg (28% DV)
1 cup of Cocoa Powder provides 66% DV. A 1.5oz (44g) candy chocolate bar provides 6% DV. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


#10: Tofu
Iron in 100g1 cup of firm tofu (126g)1/4 Block (81g)
2.7mg (15% DV)3.4mg (19% DV)2.2mg (12% DV)
Calcium can interfere with non-heme iron absorption. Try to buy tofu without added calcium for greater iron absorption. Click to see complete nutrition facts.
leebles
by Bronze Member on Feb. 23, 2015 at 10:42 AM
Thank you for all the information! We eat All those things on a daily basis. I have never had a problem with my iron but how do i feed kale to a baby I cook it we seasonings...

Quoting kajira:

I dont' do cows milk, we do almond milk, but we eat whatever except gluten.

While iron is better absorbed from heme (meat) sources, non-heme (plant) iron is better regulated causing less damage to the body. High iron foods include clams, liver, sunflower seeds, nuts, beef, lamb,beanswhole grains, dark leafy greens (spinach), dark chocolate, and tofu

Mom2Wyatt213
by Member on Feb. 23, 2015 at 10:49 AM
You can cook the kale or even spinich and puree it in a food processor with some vegetable broth or even water until its smooth.
Dani1009
by Group Admin on Feb. 25, 2015 at 9:01 PM
Ella is currently allergic to cows milk. So I drink almond milk instead & I imagine that's what she will drink after her first birthday since its so high in calcium. In regards to iron, I feed them pureed stew meat a few times per week. We are still introducing foods but eventually they will eat other high iron foods like kale & spinach.
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