Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Lots Of Questions!

Posted by on May. 29, 2013 at 1:07 PM
  • 4 Replies
  • 302 Total Views
I have a few questions for anyone who has completed nursing school or is current in school.
- what was your schedule like when you started clinicals?
- did you get your ADN at a community college and then transfer somewhere for your BSN?
- how long did it take you to get your BSN?
- can you work with your ADN while you are obtaining your BSN?
- do you enjoy being a nurse?

I've read that it's better to get your BSN so I plan to get my ADN and then transfer to a 4 year college for my BSN. I'm a little nervous about clinicals because I will have a 7,6,4 & 1 year old by the time I start. I don't want to take on too much at once. I will be taking my gen edu classes in the fall. I have already taken English and psychology.
by on May. 29, 2013 at 1:07 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-4):
musicpisces
by on May. 29, 2013 at 2:33 PM

I'm currently halfway through a 2 year BSN program (kill me- too accelerated, IMO, but I'm getting As).

Our lecture schedules have varied every semester, but clinicals so far have been on Thursdays and Fridays for the first 3 semesters.  The fourth semester will be all over the board when we have our preceptorships.  Lecture was Mondays and Wednesdays for the first semester, Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday for the second, and this fall they'll be all day on Tuesdays.  The fourth semester will primarily be online.

I don't have an ADN.  I went straight for the BSN, because I know I'm going for my master's.

You can definitely work while getting your BSN if you're an ADN, but the ones I know are mostly only working part time while getting their BSNs.

I LOVE every second of working in the hospital.  Clincials just totally reinforce for me how much I want to do this for a living.  I have been in the medical field for a long time (I am a former Navy corpsman, I was a first responder, I worked at a birth center...), so I've known for a long time that I would love this.  There's definitely bureaucracy and stupid stuff you have to put up with, but it's really rewarding working with patients.

What is it specifically about the clinicals that makes you nervous?  It's just part of the school schedule for us.  Don't forget about the hours of reading and studying- THOSE are the hardest part for me, because they're not set hours, so I have to negotiate more for them.

Do you have a lot of support around you?  You'll need as much as you can rally, because you will be a busy girl!  If you already know you want to get your BSN, you might consider saving yourself a year and going right for the BSN.

Suzanne

"Don't sacrifice what you want most for what you want right now."

JaLayah
by New Member on May. 29, 2013 at 2:47 PM
I guess I'm just nervous about balancing being a mom, wife and a full time student! It seems like I have only little free time now so I know when I start clinicals I will have even less time and have to squeeze in studying too! I have my husband who will help out and a few other family members.

I thought no matter how you went about it getting your BSN would still take 4 years? I guess I have to look at more schools in my area. I just read that it's becoming harder to find jobs with just a ADN so that's why I was looking to get my BSN. I'm still researching! Lol


Quoting musicpisces:

I'm currently halfway through a 2 year BSN program (kill me- too accelerated, IMO, but I'm getting As).

Our lecture schedules have varied every semester, but clinicals so far have been on Thursdays and Fridays for the first 3 semesters.  The fourth semester will be all over the board when we have our preceptorships.  Lecture was Mondays and Wednesdays for the first semester, Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday for the second, and this fall they'll be all day on Tuesdays.  The fourth semester will primarily be online.

I don't have an ADN.  I went straight for the BSN, because I know I'm going for my master's.

You can definitely work while getting your BSN if you're an ADN, but the ones I know are mostly only working part time while getting their BSNs.

I LOVE every second of working in the hospital.  Clincials just totally reinforce for me how much I want to do this for a living.  I have been in the medical field for a long time (I am a former Navy corpsman, I was a first responder, I worked at a birth center...), so I've known for a long time that I would love this.  There's definitely bureaucracy and stupid stuff you have to put up with, but it's really rewarding working with patients.

What is it specifically about the clinicals that makes you nervous?  It's just part of the school schedule for us.  Don't forget about the hours of reading and studying- THOSE are the hardest part for me, because they're not set hours, so I have to negotiate more for them.

Do you have a lot of support around you?  You'll need as much as you can rally, because you will be a busy girl!  If you already know you want to get your BSN, you might consider saving yourself a year and going right for the BSN.

musicpisces
by on May. 29, 2013 at 2:54 PM

Look at the programs you're considering.  My program is only 2 years, and most here in CA are 3.  ADN programs are 2 years, and most ADN to BSN programs are 1-2 years.

It's definitely hard balancing all of those things (plus, I'm a runner, so making the time to run, which keeps me sane, is hard).  You'll find a way to make it work, especially if this is important to you.  I was working in the beginning, and that was awful.  I had to quit after a month.  My hubby totally feels neglected, and I hate it.  We both have to constantly remind ourselves this is only temporary, and we make the most of the time we do get together.  Breaks we spend doing fun things as a family.

Quoting JaLayah:

I guess I'm just nervous about balancing being a mom, wife and a full time student! It seems like I have only little free time now so I know when I start clinicals I will have even less time and have to squeeze in studying too! I have my husband who will help out and a few other family members.

I thought no matter how you went about it getting your BSN would still take 4 years? I guess I have to look at more schools in my area. I just read that it's becoming harder to find jobs with just a ADN so that's why I was looking to get my BSN. I'm still researching! Lol


Quoting musicpisces:

I'm currently halfway through a 2 year BSN program (kill me- too accelerated, IMO, but I'm getting As).

Our lecture schedules have varied every semester, but clinicals so far have been on Thursdays and Fridays for the first 3 semesters.  The fourth semester will be all over the board when we have our preceptorships.  Lecture was Mondays and Wednesdays for the first semester, Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday for the second, and this fall they'll be all day on Tuesdays.  The fourth semester will primarily be online.

I don't have an ADN.  I went straight for the BSN, because I know I'm going for my master's.

You can definitely work while getting your BSN if you're an ADN, but the ones I know are mostly only working part time while getting their BSNs.

I LOVE every second of working in the hospital.  Clincials just totally reinforce for me how much I want to do this for a living.  I have been in the medical field for a long time (I am a former Navy corpsman, I was a first responder, I worked at a birth center...), so I've known for a long time that I would love this.  There's definitely bureaucracy and stupid stuff you have to put up with, but it's really rewarding working with patients.

What is it specifically about the clinicals that makes you nervous?  It's just part of the school schedule for us.  Don't forget about the hours of reading and studying- THOSE are the hardest part for me, because they're not set hours, so I have to negotiate more for them.

Do you have a lot of support around you?  You'll need as much as you can rally, because you will be a busy girl!  If you already know you want to get your BSN, you might consider saving yourself a year and going right for the BSN.


Suzanne

"Don't sacrifice what you want most for what you want right now."

SusanD
by Member on May. 29, 2013 at 4:13 PM

 

Quoting JaLayah:

I have a few questions for anyone who has completed nursing school or is current in school.
- what was your schedule like when you started clinicals? - It varied each semester. Typically we had class for 2 full days of the week and clinicals 2 full days of the week. Clinicals were generally from 6:30 until 3:30.
- did you get your ADN at a community college and then transfer somewhere for your BSN? Yes
- how long did it take you to get your BSN? It depends. BSNs often have additional pre-reqs. Usually this is an additional semester or two of courses if you haven't already gotten those out of the way. Then depending upon the BSN program and how it is set up it can take anywhere from 10 months to 18months full-time.
- can you work with your ADN while you are obtaining your BSN? Again, that depends upon the program. Some are structured specifically for the working nurse. Others do not work well for the nurse who is working full-time.
- do you enjoy being a nurse? Absolutely!

I've read that it's better to get your BSN so I plan to get my ADN and then transfer to a 4 year college for my BSN. I'm a little nervous about clinicals because I will have a 7,6,4 & 1 year old by the time I start. I don't want to take on too much at once. I will be taking my gen edu classes in the fall. I have already taken English and psychology. It is better to get a BSN because it opens up many more opportunities for you. It also is a step in the right direction should you decide to pursue a masters. Now, having said that there have been many changes in masters track programs. If you have not gotten into a Nurse Practitioner program by 2015, then you can not become a nurse prac with a masters. You have to go the route of a doctorate. This is the way that MANY areas of advance practice nursing are going. However, having a BSN opens up many other doors like opportunities in specialty areas at some hospitals that require a BSN to work in critical care, working in magnet status facilities, research nursing, and fields that generally are not open to ADN holding RNs.

 

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)