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hi! just started Wednesday...

Posted by on Mar. 22, 2013 at 6:22 AM
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On Wednesday I pulled my 13yr old with Aspergers (autism spectrum) out of school to homeschool him, as the public school has been failing him since we moved to this state (charlotte NC). I have two other sons in public schools (they are 14&7) they don't have any issues (maybe due to the fact that they are not in special education system?) ...anyways....
I could really use some low cost help /suggestions on getting started. I had him do an assessment yesterday and he is at 7th grade level for reading and 3rd grade level for math (he is in 8th grade).
any help/suggestions will be much appreciated:)
thank you -Tina
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by on Mar. 22, 2013 at 6:22 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Bleacheddecay
by Group Owner on Mar. 22, 2013 at 12:22 PM
1 mom liked this

Hi and welcome,

I'm not familiar with specifics of help autistic students and parents. I do know that the same people that make POC4U have some materials for those with learning issues and attentional issues but I'm not sure if that will go into the autism spectrum or not.

Here are my best tips for those begining to homeschool.

1. Look up your state laws. Make sure you are in compliance. I like this site rather than HSLDA

http://homeschooling.gomilpitas.com/directory/Legalities.htm

2. Decide what your mutual goals for the future of your student are, high school degree, GED, college and so on.

3. Find out your teen's best learning styles. I'd use POC4U to aide this.

http://www.edudps.com/poc4u.html

4. Research ways to do an education along with your teen. I recommend The Teenage Liberation Handbook.

5. Pick out curriculum (if any)  WITH your teen. I do not recommend buying a full curriculum the first year. It tends to lead to frustration and a waste of money.

6. Be flexible, expect change.

7. Locate local groups and resources.

8. Don't forget to make it fun, relax now and then, just enjoy each other.

9. Be sure to keep your student in touch with any friends they really want to spend time with and which you do not feel are a really bad influence.

And finally, relax, relax, relax. The very best thing you can do is de-school. Let your students find what their are passions and pursue them.

I have one that has won a four year academic scholarship and one that has won a renewable athletic scholarship. That's only my student athlete's first college visit and offer. There are more offers to come.

Stressing over making your child learn or doing what the public or private schools are doing or doing enough won't help you or them. I wish someone had told me that when I began and that I could have wrapped my head around it and believed it.

Love them. Like them. Trust them. Support their dreams even when you don't like or understand what they are. This is the best gift you can give anyone. It's also a gift that will allow them to do things that will impress you over the years.

BD

mommaTLC186
by New Member on Mar. 22, 2013 at 12:50 PM

 Thank you sooo soooo much!! I really appreciate the "have fun relax dont stress" advice. Im feeling quite overwhelmed and worried that Im going to do this all wrong, right now.

Quoting Bleacheddecay:

Hi and welcome,

I'm not familiar with specifics of help autistic students and parents. I do know that the same people that make POC4U have some materials for those with learning issues and attentional issues but I'm not sure if that will go into the autism spectrum or not.

Here are my best tips for those begining to homeschool.

1. Look up your state laws. Make sure you are in compliance. I like this site rather than HSLDA

http://homeschooling.gomilpitas.com/directory/Legalities.htm

2. Decide what your mutual goals for the future of your student are, high school degree, GED, college and so on.

3. Find out your teen's best learning styles. I'd use POC4U to aide this.

http://www.edudps.com/poc4u.html

4. Research ways to do an education along with your teen. I recommend The Teenage Liberation Handbook.

5. Pick out curriculum (if any)  WITH your teen. I do not recommend buying a full curriculum the first year. It tends to lead to frustration and a waste of money.

6. Be flexible, expect change.

7. Locate local groups and resources.

8. Don't forget to make it fun, relax now and then, just enjoy each other.

9. Be sure to keep your student in touch with any friends they really want to spend time with and which you do not feel are a really bad influence.

And finally, relax, relax, relax. The very best thing you can do is de-school. Let your students find what their are passions and pursue them.

I have one that has won a four year academic scholarship and one that has won a renewable athletic scholarship. That's only my student athlete's first college visit and offer. There are more offers to come.

Stressing over making your child learn or doing what the public or private schools are doing or doing enough won't help you or them. I wish someone had told me that when I began and that I could have wrapped my head around it and believed it.

Love them. Like them. Trust them. Support their dreams even when you don't like or understand what they are. This is the best gift you can give anyone. It's also a gift that will allow them to do things that will impress you over the years.

BD

 

Bleacheddecay
by Group Owner on Mar. 22, 2013 at 5:28 PM

How you are feeling is perfectly normal, however, I'm not sure stressing is useful. So, yes, find a way to relax and have faith it will all work out. *hugs*


Quoting mommaTLC186:

 Thank you sooo soooo much!! I really appreciate the "have fun relax dont stress" advice. Im feeling quite overwhelmed and worried that Im going to do this all wrong, right now.

Quoting Bleacheddecay:

Hi and welcome,

I'm not familiar with specifics of help autistic students and parents. I do know that the same people that make POC4U have some materials for those with learning issues and attentional issues but I'm not sure if that will go into the autism spectrum or not.

Here are my best tips for those begining to homeschool.

1. Look up your state laws. Make sure you are in compliance. I like this site rather than HSLDA

http://homeschooling.gomilpitas.com/directory/Legalities.htm

2. Decide what your mutual goals for the future of your student are, high school degree, GED, college and so on.

3. Find out your teen's best learning styles. I'd use POC4U to aide this.

http://www.edudps.com/poc4u.html

4. Research ways to do an education along with your teen. I recommend The Teenage Liberation Handbook.

5. Pick out curriculum (if any)  WITH your teen. I do not recommend buying a full curriculum the first year. It tends to lead to frustration and a waste of money.

6. Be flexible, expect change.

7. Locate local groups and resources.

8. Don't forget to make it fun, relax now and then, just enjoy each other.

9. Be sure to keep your student in touch with any friends they really want to spend time with and which you do not feel are a really bad influence.

And finally, relax, relax, relax. The very best thing you can do is de-school. Let your students find what their are passions and pursue them.

I have one that has won a four year academic scholarship and one that has won a renewable athletic scholarship. That's only my student athlete's first college visit and offer. There are more offers to come.

Stressing over making your child learn or doing what the public or private schools are doing or doing enough won't help you or them. I wish someone had told me that when I began and that I could have wrapped my head around it and believed it.

Love them. Like them. Trust them. Support their dreams even when you don't like or understand what they are. This is the best gift you can give anyone. It's also a gift that will allow them to do things that will impress you over the years.

BD

 



vampporcupine
by Member on Mar. 22, 2013 at 7:28 PM
2 moms liked this

I was overwhelmed when I first started, lol. I remember the panic I felt. I had started my older daughter in grade 3 and my youngest in grade 1. I had it in my head that if they can't read well, they can't do the remainder of thier work. I also had no one to compare to. By october, I had them reading chapter books. When the facilitator came to see our progress, she was shocked, lol. Apparently for grade 1 pages with three words was sufficient. 

Anyways, saxon math is good. Chapters carries the books for it. 

mommaTLC186
by New Member on Mar. 22, 2013 at 9:16 PM
1 mom liked this

 no, stressing is not useful...in any situation :) Thank you!

Quoting Bleacheddecay:

How you are feeling is perfectly normal, however, I'm not sure stressing is useful. So, yes, find a way to relax and have faith it will all work out. *hugs*

 

Quoting mommaTLC186:

 Thank you sooo soooo much!! I really appreciate the "have fun relax dont stress" advice. Im feeling quite overwhelmed and worried that Im going to do this all wrong, right now.

Quoting Bleacheddecay:

Hi and welcome,

I'm not familiar with specifics of help autistic students and parents. I do know that the same people that make POC4U have some materials for those with learning issues and attentional issues but I'm not sure if that will go into the autism spectrum or not.

Here are my best tips for those begining to homeschool.

1. Look up your state laws. Make sure you are in compliance. I like this site rather than HSLDA

http://homeschooling.gomilpitas.com/directory/Legalities.htm

2. Decide what your mutual goals for the future of your student are, high school degree, GED, college and so on.

3. Find out your teen's best learning styles. I'd use POC4U to aide this.

http://www.edudps.com/poc4u.html

4. Research ways to do an education along with your teen. I recommend The Teenage Liberation Handbook.

5. Pick out curriculum (if any)  WITH your teen. I do not recommend buying a full curriculum the first year. It tends to lead to frustration and a waste of money.

6. Be flexible, expect change.

7. Locate local groups and resources.

8. Don't forget to make it fun, relax now and then, just enjoy each other.

9. Be sure to keep your student in touch with any friends they really want to spend time with and which you do not feel are a really bad influence.

And finally, relax, relax, relax. The very best thing you can do is de-school. Let your students find what their are passions and pursue them.

I have one that has won a four year academic scholarship and one that has won a renewable athletic scholarship. That's only my student athlete's first college visit and offer. There are more offers to come.

Stressing over making your child learn or doing what the public or private schools are doing or doing enough won't help you or them. I wish someone had told me that when I began and that I could have wrapped my head around it and believed it.

Love them. Like them. Trust them. Support their dreams even when you don't like or understand what they are. This is the best gift you can give anyone. It's also a gift that will allow them to do things that will impress you over the years.

BD

 

 

 

 

mommaTLC186
by New Member on Mar. 22, 2013 at 9:18 PM
1 mom liked this

 Great job! I'm sure once I find things he is interested in and we develop a routine things will fall into place. I just have to remember to have fun and breathe lol

My son does not like to read or do math ... I have to find a way to make it more enjoyable for him :)

Quoting vampporcupine:

I was overwhelmed when I first started, lol. I remember the panic I felt. I had started my older daughter in grade 3 and my youngest in grade 1. I had it in my head that if they can't read well, they can't do the remainder of thier work. I also had no one to compare to. By october, I had them reading chapter books. When the facilitator came to see our progress, she was shocked, lol. Apparently for grade 1 pages with three words was sufficient. 

Anyways, saxon math is good. Chapters carries the books for it. 

 

Momof2IA
by Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 9:30 AM
1 mom liked this

There are so many ways out there now it just takes time to try them and see what fits.  There is a book I got at a book store for $20 that I believe is called "How to homeschool for free."  It is broken down by subject then grade.  It is all websites for worksheets and online games and classes.  It is a great investment to be able to check out different sites.  There is also a homeschool classifed website that you can  buy and sell books and curriculum cheaply so you can try something as well and if it doesn't work just sell it.  A lot of websites will give you a free trial.  I wouldn't worry about age so much on some of these sites if its appropriate.  My son likes some of the younger sites but he still learns.  We do play math games as well.  Sometimes they just need a break from the regular.  We use a lot from tv as well with the history channel and discovery.  Good luck.  It's all trial and error so if something is not working just look for something else. 

summerlee49
by on Dec. 4, 2013 at 4:43 PM

I homeschool my 8 year old who is EXTREMELY hyper with ADHD, and my 13 year old who is highly gifted. I am stressed about both of them. There are sooo many options out there-it's overwhelming! Just started using eTap.org...it seems very well rounded so far. My 8 year old is a struggling reader, so I'm trying to figure out the best ways to teach her-she only has about 10 minutes of concentration at a time before she runs off again! What are you using for curriculum now? 

Bleacheddecay
by Group Owner on Dec. 6, 2013 at 3:54 PM

My kids have graduated so I'm not using anything. What is everyone else using?

Momof2IA
by Member on Dec. 9, 2013 at 6:23 PM
Sorry I don't know if I can help much. Are there certain books she loves? Maybe getting some from the library and reading to her as she follows along will help. Have her help you in the grocery store or look for words while riding in the car like I spy. God luck. As far as time just work on say five minutes for a few weeks and then maybe adding a minute for a we or two then one more minute. Plan a fun activity like a trip to the park or a special dessert for gaining time.
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