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Natural Birth & Parenting Natural Birth & Parenting

What is the difference between a Midwife and a Doula?

Posted by on Nov. 3, 2010 at 10:26 PM
  • 5 Replies

On dictionary.com the definition doesnt have a difference...

How do you get trained for this? Do you have to be legally certified?

Anyone care to share how much they make?

THANKS!

by on Nov. 3, 2010 at 10:26 PM
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Replies (1-5):
natashaangel
by on Nov. 3, 2010 at 11:57 PM

a midwife delivers the baby and a doula is there for support. a doula does not deliver babies. You have to take workshops to be a doula and yes you have to get certified. I am not a doula but looked into it at one point. i decided not to do it because i still have small children at home and if my patient were to go into labor i wouldn't have a babysitter at the drop of a dime.

doulala
by on Nov. 4, 2010 at 1:20 AM
Midwives and nurses are clinical care providers. In many countries, midwives may be the only caregiver a woman sees throughout her pregnancy and birth – an obstetrician would only be called in if there were a serious problem. In Singapore, however, midwives provide care during labour and birth alongside doctors; they are not independent caregivers. Midwives carry out monitoring of the mother and baby, perform vaginal examinations, assess the progress of labour, assist the doctor, and generally support the mother through labour and birth. Midwives may be in the labour room very frequently or only for a few minutes of every hour, depending on the circumstances with each couple.

Doulas, on the other hand, give you non-clinical support, and information. A doula does not monitor your baby's heartbeat or examine you. She is there to focus on you, your partner, and your experience, not on your health care. She may offer comfort measures, strategies for getting rest, and can ensure you understand what is happening in your body at different phases of labour. She explains medical terms and procedures and can help you explore your whole range of options in any circumstance in a clear, straightforward way, so you don't feel confused or overwhelmed. When you have a decision to make, she can help you get the background you want and communicate most effectively with your doctor and nurses.

Doulas, midwives, and doctors ideally work as a team, each providing a different form of care that together offers you the most complete support possible.
tiger_tatted1
by on Nov. 4, 2010 at 10:28 AM


Quoting doulala:

Midwives and nurses are clinical care providers. In many countries, midwives may be the only caregiver a woman sees throughout her pregnancy and birth – an obstetrician would only be called in if there were a serious problem. In Singapore, however, midwives provide care during labour and birth alongside doctors; they are not independent caregivers. Midwives carry out monitoring of the mother and baby, perform vaginal examinations, assess the progress of labour, assist the doctor, and generally support the mother through labour and birth. Midwives may be in the labour room very frequently or only for a few minutes of every hour, depending on the circumstances with each couple.

Doulas, on the other hand, give you non-clinical support, and information. A doula does not monitor your baby's heartbeat or examine you. She is there to focus on you, your partner, and your experience, not on your health care. She may offer comfort measures, strategies for getting rest, and can ensure you understand what is happening in your body at different phases of labour. She explains medical terms and procedures and can help you explore your whole range of options in any circumstance in a clear, straightforward way, so you don't feel confused or overwhelmed. When you have a decision to make, she can help you get the background you want and communicate most effectively with your doctor and nurses.

Doulas, midwives, and doctors ideally work as a team, each providing a different form of care that together offers you the most complete support possible.

Thank You for the wonderfully detailed explanation!

truealaskanmom
by on Nov. 5, 2010 at 4:53 PM


Quoting doulala:

Midwives and nurses are clinical care providers. In many countries, midwives may be the only caregiver a woman sees throughout her pregnancy and birth – an obstetrician would only be called in if there were a serious problem. In Singapore, however, midwives provide care during labour and birth alongside doctors; they are not independent caregivers. Midwives carry out monitoring of the mother and baby, perform vaginal examinations, assess the progress of labour, assist the doctor, and generally support the mother through labour and birth. Midwives may be in the labour room very frequently or only for a few minutes of every hour, depending on the circumstances with each couple.

Doulas, on the other hand, give you non-clinical support, and information. A doula does not monitor your baby's heartbeat or examine you. She is there to focus on you, your partner, and your experience, not on your health care. She may offer comfort measures, strategies for getting rest, and can ensure you understand what is happening in your body at different phases of labour. She explains medical terms and procedures and can help you explore your whole range of options in any circumstance in a clear, straightforward way, so you don't feel confused or overwhelmed. When you have a decision to make, she can help you get the background you want and communicate most effectively with your doctor and nurses.

Doulas, midwives, and doctors ideally work as a team, each providing a different form of care that together offers you the most complete support possible.

what she said lol

gypsyjewels
by on Nov. 6, 2010 at 5:49 PM

I work on a donation basis currently. It's important to me that my services be available to ALL who need/want them. 

I would have answered your other question - but doulala did so so eloquently already! 

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