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Natural Birth & Parenting Natural Birth & Parenting

Birth plan yay or nay?

Posted by on Nov. 5, 2010 at 5:10 PM
  • 11 Replies

Will you have or did you have a birth plan?  Why or why not?

by on Nov. 5, 2010 at 5:10 PM
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Replies (1-10):
MarigoldsMama
by on Nov. 5, 2010 at 6:16 PM

I had Birth Plans with all 3 of mine.

I know a lot of people say, "Don't bother" but I found them to be really useful, especially since I knew I wanted a non-medicated / intervention free birth in a hospital setting.

Initially, writing the plan helped me solidify my own ideas about the birth I wanted. I was able to work through different scenarios and how I wanted to respond to them, prior to the actual event. For example, I knew I didn't want to be induced, so my OB and I had that conversation far before I went to the end of the 42nd week. I went into spontaneous labor without any pressure to induce.

I also used the Birth Plan as an opportunity to cover all of my concerns with my OB. I had him sign the plan too, so that there would be no confrontation with hospital staff. The signed copy was faxed to the hospital and was in my file when I walked in the door.

Once I arrived at the hospital, I went over the birth plan with the nurse assigned to my care. It was nice to go through point by point without forgetting anything. For example, I refused an IV and constant fetal monitoring, which are standard for most Moms. Instead, I requested that the nurse check baby's heartrate with a handheld doppler. The OB already signed off... there was no issue.

Anyway... my Birth Plans were followed to the letter all three times, despite the fact that my labors were long and had some complications. I think they can be a valuable tool, along with knowledge, confidence and good support.

 

truealaskanmom
by on Nov. 5, 2010 at 6:25 PM

I had one and I was a stickler about it, and I think that is the only reason I didn't have as much of a fight

kitty8199
by on Nov. 5, 2010 at 6:29 PM


Quoting MarigoldsMama:

 For example, I refused an IV and constant fetal monitoring, which are standard for most Moms. Instead, I requested that the nurse check baby's heartrate with a handheld doppler. The OB already signed off... there was no issue.

I can do that?  All my friends told me they make you and won't let you refuse the IV.  I don't see the point, if I'm not using drugs.  They said I have to have fluids.  My friends have tried to refuse, and were made to get one.  The OB signs off, so if the doc says ok, I can get what I want?

pregnancy week by week

truealaskanmom
by on Nov. 5, 2010 at 6:34 PM


Quoting kitty8199:


Quoting MarigoldsMama:

 For example, I refused an IV and constant fetal monitoring, which are standard for most Moms. Instead, I requested that the nurse check baby's heartrate with a handheld doppler. The OB already signed off... there was no issue.

I can do that?  All my friends told me they make you and won't let you refuse the IV.  I don't see the point, if I'm not using drugs.  They said I have to have fluids.  My friends have tried to refuse, and were made to get one.  The OB signs off, so if the doc says ok, I can get what I want?

yes you can refuse anything and everything, my big thing with IVs is that it gives them a place to put stuff in you without you knowing it is sad but it happens, and also IV fluids make your tissues swell and can cause you to tear while pushing.  It doesn't matter if your doc okays it or not if you say no they can't give it to you it is illegal for them to. I am going to see if I can find my info about legalities of these things. Basically informed consent says you say no they cannot do it no matter what

Roadfamily6now
by on Nov. 5, 2010 at 6:52 PM

I think that if you are birthing in a hospital it is important to have a written statement of your wishes.
I also think that women need to understand that during labor, they might change their mind about certan things and need to be able to kinda "go with the flow" and accept what nature tells her to do.

Somethings that we want, ie: no episiotomy, not offering drugs, no pitocin, no Vit K shot, delayed cord clamping... etc. All those things are pretty easy to get and to not have changed during your labor.

Things like insense, water birth, squatting, songs, what you are wearing, etc. are all things that can go by the way side once labor is in full swing.

So, in short, Birth Plans are good. Flexibility is good. Making sure you have a supportive team around you during labor? Priceless!

truealaskanmom
by on Nov. 5, 2010 at 7:09 PM


Quoting Roadfamily6now:

I think that if you are birthing in a hospital it is important to have a written statement of your wishes.
I also think that women need to understand that during labor, they might change their mind about certan things and need to be able to kinda "go with the flow" and accept what nature tells her to do.

Somethings that we want, ie: no episiotomy, not offering drugs, no pitocin, no Vit K shot, delayed cord clamping... etc. All those things are pretty easy to get and to not have changed during your labor.

Things like insense, water birth, squatting, songs, what you are wearing, etc. are all things that can go by the way side once labor is in full swing.

So, in short, Birth Plans are good. Flexibility is good. Making sure you have a supportive team around you during labor? Priceless!

That is most important, I would know my labor team not only supported me but told me no when I needed to be told no. 

DixieFlower
by on Nov. 5, 2010 at 8:20 PM

I have had a birth plan for both births. My doula and OB both encourage them. I feel they are important especially with a hospital birth since there will be many people besides your OB involved in your care and in the care of baby once baby is born.

Tressakim
by on Nov. 6, 2010 at 1:59 PM

I did have one last time, not that it was worth anything.  This time I have the same nurse/midwives, and I plan on putting on their plan they have us fill out, Just leave me alone, no touching, no monitoring, no checking, nothing, I will go home,  I will tell you when I'm ready, and the nurses better have this explained to them.  My last labor was hell because I wasn't allowed to do what I want, if I'm more comfortable on my knees puking into the toilet, then leave me there, I was comfortable.  And being strapped to the bed so they can monitor you and check for dilating was the worst part.  And I was feverish and being touched by anyone felt absolutely horible.

But I plan on laboring as much as posible at home this time, considered delivering myself at home, but there's no doctor there for the baby, and you never know for sure, my son needed one.  Might see, if I feel like it at the time, if I could deliver myself at the hospital anyways, just seems like a good idea.

doulala
by on Nov. 6, 2010 at 4:16 PM


Quoting kitty8199:


Quoting MarigoldsMama:

 For example, I refused an IV and constant fetal monitoring, which are standard for most Moms. Instead, I requested that the nurse check baby's heartrate with a handheld doppler. The OB already signed off... there was no issue.

I can do that?  All my friends told me they make you and won't let you refuse the IV.  I don't see the point, if I'm not using drugs.  They said I have to have fluids.  My friends have tried to refuse, and were made to get one.  The OB signs off, so if the doc says ok, I can get what I want?

You may do as you like.
It is common for things to be presented like a requirement, unfortunately.   But you can not be forced into medical procedures; you must consent.

Let them know you will avoid unnecessary interventions, even if this is inconvenient for them.   They are paid to help you have a happy & safe birth experience.   (You are not their science experiment, lol.)

There are ways to make this smoother, though.
Having it in your birth plan, having a doula, being upfront with them--that you know what you want (and your rights, if you must "go there").


An IV for fluids, lol...    how about drinking water?!
;-P



If you don't know your options, you don't have any.           ~Korte & Scaer

Mothers need to know that their care and their choices won't be compromised by birth politics.                                                                                            ~Jennifer Rosenberg

Midwives
see birth as a miracle and only mess with it if there's a problem;
doctors see birth as a problem and if they don't mess with it, it's a
miracle!     
~Barbara Harper

doulala
by on Nov. 6, 2010 at 4:19 PM

Good points!

There are way too many stories of moms having things without giving their permission. 
:-(

Having a doula will help~  but avoiding the unnecessary IV is the best way to avoid anything being put into the IV--


Quoting truealaskanmom:


Quoting kitty8199:

yes you can refuse anything and everything, my big thing with IVs is that it gives them a place to put stuff in you without you knowing it is sad but it happens, and also IV fluids make your tissues swell and can cause you to tear while pushing.  It doesn't matter if your doc okays it or not if you say no they can't give it to you it is illegal for them to. I am going to see if I can find my info about legalities of these things. Basically informed consent says you say no they cannot do it no matter what


Just as a woman’s heart knows,

How and when to pump,

Her lungs to inhale,

And her hand to pull back from fire,

So she knows when and how to give birth.


- Virginia Di


ICAN

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