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Natural Birth & Parenting Natural Birth & Parenting

"Breastfeeding failure" is an oxymoron

Posted by on Nov. 4, 2011 at 4:23 PM
  • 14 Replies
1 mom liked this
"Breastfeeding is a relationship--not a test-- and success looks different for everyone." ANY amount of breastfeeding benefits your baby!

http://www.bestforbabes.org/breastfeeding-failure-is-an-oxymoron/

by on Nov. 4, 2011 at 4:23 PM
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Replies (1-10):
truealaskanmom
by on Nov. 4, 2011 at 4:47 PM

That is good I also think that failure is the society view and lack of easily available support and information 

jconney80
by Group Mod on Nov. 4, 2011 at 5:58 PM

This is my favorite part of this article & I see it so so much. This is why there is so much defensiveness about breastfeeding. And why so much controversy & drama explodes over posts about breastfeeding. Women take it so personal when they see themselves as failures over this. I didn't get to nurse my first like I wanted due to her being born 4 weeks early among other things. But I owned that experience. It happened & there is no need to defend it. I learned from it. This puts into words what I couldn't...

The reality of the situation is that due to the biological nature of breastfeeding and the expected relationship between a mother and her child, when breastfeeding doesn’t work out, there is a loss felt. This loss is sometimes not recognized as a loss and as a result many women carry with them feelings that they identify as guilt and a sense of failure.

Mare1180
by on Nov. 4, 2011 at 9:33 PM
I definitely felt a loss, and a sense of failure, I was so ashamed I couldn't bf, I was just happy I pumped for 5 wks but I really couldn't let it go, I am finally taking something for my ppd and trying to let go of it.
We still do skin to skin, he would only take a bottle from me for a long time and i was okay with that (my dh not so much) but in my mind and maybe my sons, i was the one to give him nourishment. I love that he's almost 9 mths and will still sleep on me for naps :) sorry i went off on a tangent ;)
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catholicmamamia
by on Nov. 5, 2011 at 2:04 AM

Thanks for sharing! 

Precious333
by Gold Member on Nov. 5, 2011 at 2:08 AM
bump for later
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Yahooligans
by on Nov. 5, 2011 at 2:12 AM

Preface: TMI


Boy... I wish this were true for me. I had DD 5 weeks early, while she was still healthy she needed to take in supplements to force her to gain weight. Additionally, the lactationist looked my nipple and said, "ohhhhhh... hmmm". Apparently my nipple was too short for her to latch on to... then they wanted me to fit a small tube into her mouth while I breast fed... so here I am with this early baby, holding a tube in it's mouth with a " suctiony nipple extender"... I tried pumping, and got one good pump from each breast. I even took medication to increase my milk...

needless to say, I developed severe postpartum depression.

One-n-Counting
by on Nov. 5, 2011 at 2:42 AM
Im sorry :(

Quoting Yahooligans:

Preface: TMI


Boy... I wish this were true for me. I had DD 5 weeks early, while she was still healthy she needed to take in supplements to force her to gain weight. Additionally, the lactationist looked my nipple and said, "ohhhhhh... hmmm". Apparently my nipple was too short for her to latch on to... then they wanted me to fit a small tube into her mouth while I breast fed... so here I am with this early baby, holding a tube in it's mouth with a " suctiony nipple extender"... I tried pumping, and got one good pump from each breast. I even took medication to increase my milk...

needless to say, I developed severe postpartum depression.

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One-n-Counting
by on Nov. 5, 2011 at 2:42 AM
Thanks for sharing
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Yahooligans
by on Nov. 5, 2011 at 2:48 AM
1 mom liked this


Quoting One-n-Counting:

Im sorry :(

Quoting Yahooligans:

Preface: TMI


Boy... I wish this were true for me. I had DD 5 weeks early, while she was still healthy she needed to take in supplements to force her to gain weight. Additionally, the lactationist looked my nipple and said, "ohhhhhh... hmmm". Apparently my nipple was too short for her to latch on to... then they wanted me to fit a small tube into her mouth while I breast fed... so here I am with this early baby, holding a tube in it's mouth with a " suctiony nipple extender"... I tried pumping, and got one good pump from each breast. I even took medication to increase my milk...

needless to say, I developed severe postpartum depression.

thanks... this was the least of our troubles! She was supposed to have ventriculomegaly (a form of hydrocephalus). I also had two placentas and she later developed jaundice... HARD pregnancy. Now she is in the 97% for height and weight, and went from literally being called "the size of a roast" to an absolute HAM! We are very proud parents despite our difficulties

KarmicChild
by on Nov. 5, 2011 at 3:36 AM

If things had gone the way I had planned, I would have breastfed my daughter until at LEAST age two (she will be three next month).  Without the right help and advice, however, I began pumping when she was two days old, and stop producing at three weeks.  My mother is a wonderful woman who fully supports breastfeeding, but she (and her sisters, and her mother) was told decades ago that she "just dryed up" at six weeks and that it was genetic.  I know, but she didn't know any better, so neither did I.  I almost feel guilty that my next child will probably get a better start than Lucy Rose did. :(

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