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Natural Birth & Parenting Natural Birth & Parenting
Replies (41-50):
anime.princess
by on Aug. 30, 2012 at 5:29 PM

I don't have tolerance for stupidity.  If a mother is HIV+ and dares to nurse her HIV- baby (if she took the adequate meds during pregnancy and had a c-section, the baby should not be born with the virus), it will be passed throught the milk.   The virus does not get destroyed by the components in the milk.  

Quoting tabi_cat1023:

Btw i find your responses very rude, its fine to disagree but there is no need for rudeness. This is a nice friendly group, how about we leave the personal attacks and rudeness out.


Quoting anime.princess:

None of those outlets are reliable sources.  Just pick a basic biology book that talks about viruses.  Don't try to feed me with your lack of knowledge.  


Quoting tabi_cat1023:

Not according to UNC CHapel Hill's recent studies

http://www.naturalnews.com/036382_breast_milk_AIDS_HIV.html

http://now.msn.com/breast-milk-has-superpowers-even-you-didnt-realize

This is current research from reliable sources


Quoting anime.princess:

You're are sooooo wrong.  That virus passes through the milk; it is not destroyed.  


Quoting tabi_cat1023:

Actually its being shown that bfing with hiv can protect babies..that bm kills the virus so i dunno there





Quoting anime.princess:

That's good, as long as she's not HIV+ or has Hepatits. 








anime.princess
by on Aug. 30, 2012 at 5:31 PM

The virus can be passed throught the milk.  I don't know how the fuck they came up with those studies.  

Quoting MaryJarrett:

So the World Health Organization recommending that even mother's with HIV/AIDs breastfeed is what?

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2009/world_aids_20091130/en/index.html


"In 2006, WHO recommended that ARVs be provided to HIV-positive pregnant women in the third trimester (beginning at 28 weeks) to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. At the time, there was insufficient evidence on the protective effect of ARVs during breastfeeding. Since then, several clinical trials have shown the efficacy of ARVs in preventing transmission to the infant while breastfeeding. The 2009 recommendations promote the use of ARVs earlier in pregnancy, starting at 14 weeks and continuing through the end of the breastfeeding period.

WHO now recommends that breastfeeding continue until the infant is 12 months of age, provided the HIV-positive mother or baby is taking ARVs during that period. This will reduce the risk of HIV transmission and improve the infant's chance of survival.

"In the new recommendations, we are sending a clear message that breastfeeding is a good option for every baby, even those with HIV-positive mothers, when they have access to ARVs," said Daisy Mafubelu, WHO's Assistant Director General for Family and Community Health."


Quoting anime.princess:

None of those outlets are reliable sources.  Just pick a basic biology book that talks about viruses.  Don't try to feed me with your lack of knowledge.  


Quoting tabi_cat1023:

Not according to UNC CHapel Hill's recent studies

http://www.naturalnews.com/036382_breast_milk_AIDS_HIV.html

http://now.msn.com/breast-milk-has-superpowers-even-you-didnt-realize

This is current research from reliable sources


Quoting anime.princess:

You're are sooooo wrong.  That virus passes through the milk; it is not destroyed.  


Quoting tabi_cat1023:

Actually its being shown that bfing with hiv can protect babies..that bm kills the virus so i dunno there





Quoting anime.princess:

That's good, as long as she's not HIV+ or has Hepatits. 







MaryJarrett
by Silver Member on Aug. 30, 2012 at 6:13 PM
1 mom liked this

Did you read it? They are being treated with antiretroviral medications. These medications are also past through the breastmilk, which combines with breastmilk's natural ability to fight diseases. The recommendation before this was for mothers with HIV/AIDs to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months, then once solids were introduced to switch to formula. That goes along the same basis that breastmilk does help STOP the virus. Those studies showed that as long as the baby was only recieving mothers milk the baby was protected. This recent study has shown that even once solids are introduced the baby is still protected.
Not treated mothers transfer rates to children are between 15-45%. Treated mothers transfer rates are below 5%. It is fairly safe to breast feed with HIV/AIDs.
Not only that but scientists are researching ways to heat treat human milk so that it will be free of diseases, including HIV/AIDs. This is still new and in testing stages. I pray that it works. Yes, it will kill some of the goodness of the human milk BUT it would be just the same as scorching milk with excess lipase to prevent breakdown during storage. Still better nutritionally that formula, so to say.   

Also, you mention Hepatitis, there are multiple strains for Hep. Here is what WHO has to say on Hep B. 

:
"
Risk of transmission by breastfeeding 

Breastfeeding has been suggested as an additional mechanism by which infants may acquire 

HBV infection, because small amounts of Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) have been 

detected in some samples of breastmilk. However, there is no evidence that breastfeeding 

increases the risk of mother to child transmission. A follow up study of 147 infants born to 

mothers known to be carriers of HBV in Taiwan (4) found similar rates of HBV infection in 92 

children who were breastfed compared to 55 who were bottle fed. A study in Britain, involving 

126 subjects, also showed no additional risk for breastfed versus non breastfed infants of carrier 

mothers (5). This study included the measurement of HBeAg status of the mothers, but found no 

association between maternal e-antigen status and transmission rates. These findings suggest 

strongly that any risk of transmission associated with breastmilk is negligible compared to the 

high risk of exposure to maternal blood and body fluids at birth. Experts on hepatitis, however, 

do have concerns that breast pathology such as cracked or bleeding nipples or lesions with serous 

exudates could expose the infant to infectious doses of HBV. " 



 

Quoting anime.princess:

The virus can be passed throught the milk.  I don't know how the fuck they came up with those studies.  

Quoting MaryJarrett:

So the World Health Organization recommending that even mother's with HIV/AIDs breastfeed is what?

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2009/world_aids_20091130/en/index.html


"In 2006, WHO recommended that ARVs be provided to HIV-positive pregnant women in the third trimester (beginning at 28 weeks) to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. At the time, there was insufficient evidence on the protective effect of ARVs during breastfeeding. Since then, several clinical trials have shown the efficacy of ARVs in preventing transmission to the infant while breastfeeding. The 2009 recommendations promote the use of ARVs earlier in pregnancy, starting at 14 weeks and continuing through the end of the breastfeeding period.

WHO now recommends that breastfeeding continue until the infant is 12 months of age, provided the HIV-positive mother or baby is taking ARVs during that period. This will reduce the risk of HIV transmission and improve the infant's chance of survival.

"In the new recommendations, we are sending a clear message that breastfeeding is a good option for every baby, even those with HIV-positive mothers, when they have access to ARVs," said Daisy Mafubelu, WHO's Assistant Director General for Family and Community Health."


Quoting anime.princess:

None of those outlets are reliable sources.  Just pick a basic biology book that talks about viruses.  Don't try to feed me with your lack of knowledge.  


Quoting tabi_cat1023:

Not according to UNC CHapel Hill's recent studies

http://www.naturalnews.com/036382_breast_milk_AIDS_HIV.html

http://now.msn.com/breast-milk-has-superpowers-even-you-didnt-realize

This is current research from reliable sources


Quoting anime.princess:

You're are sooooo wrong.  That virus passes through the milk; it is not destroyed.  


Quoting tabi_cat1023:

Actually its being shown that bfing with hiv can protect babies..that bm kills the virus so i dunno there





Quoting anime.princess:

That's good, as long as she's not HIV+ or has Hepatits. 








I'm Mary married(since 10-5-08) to Dallen, mommy to Serenity(2008) & Caidence(2010). Christian, SAHM, Full- term breast feeding, Cloth diapering, Vaccinating, Anti-CIO/Sleep-training, Natural birthing, holistic loving, AP, ERF, Bedsharing/co-sleepingresearch-loving kinda mama.

anime.princess
by on Aug. 30, 2012 at 6:18 PM

It is not 100% safe anyways; 95% safe, perhaps but not worth the risk.  It will still pass, regardless of the medication taken.   Looks like that part of the article YOU didn't read it.

Quoting MaryJarrett:

Did you read it? They are being treated with antiretroviral medications. These medications are also past through the breastmilk, which combines with breastmilk's natural ability to fight diseases. The recommendation before this was for mothers with HIV/AIDs to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months, then once solids were introduced to switch to formula. That goes along the same basis that breastmilk does help STOP the virus. Those studies showed that as long as the baby was only recieving mothers milk the baby was protected. This recent study has shown that even once solids are introduced the baby is still protected.
Not treated mothers transfer rates to children are between 15-45%. Treated mothers transfer rates are below 5%. It is fairly safe to breast feed with HIV/AIDs.
Not only that but scientists are researching ways to heat treat human milk so that it will be free of diseases, including HIV/AIDs. This is still new and in testing stages. I pray that it works. Yes, it will kill some of the goodness of the human milk BUT it would be just the same as scorching milk with excess lipase to prevent breakdown during storage. Still better nutritionally that formula, so to say.   

Also, you mention Hepatitis, there are multiple strains for Hep. Here is what WHO has to say on Hep B. 

:
"Risk of transmission by breastfeeding 

Breastfeeding has been suggested as an additional mechanism by which infants may acquire 

HBV infection, because small amounts of Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) have been 

detected in some samples of breastmilk. However, there is no evidence that breastfeeding 

increases the risk of mother to child transmission. A follow up study of 147 infants born to 

mothers known to be carriers of HBV in Taiwan (4) found similar rates of HBV infection in 92 

children who were breastfed compared to 55 who were bottle fed. A study in Britain, involving 

126 subjects, also showed no additional risk for breastfed versus non breastfed infants of carrier 

mothers (5). This study included the measurement of HBeAg status of the mothers, but found no 

association between maternal e-antigen status and transmission rates. These findings suggest 

strongly that any risk of transmission associated with breastmilk is negligible compared to the 

high risk of exposure to maternal blood and body fluids at birth. Experts on hepatitis, however, 

do have concerns that breast pathology such as cracked or bleeding nipples or lesions with serous 

exudates could expose the infant to infectious doses of HBV. " 



 

Quoting anime.princess:

The virus can be passed throught the milk.  I don't know how the fuck they came up with those studies.  

Quoting MaryJarrett:

So the World Health Organization recommending that even mother's with HIV/AIDs breastfeed is what?

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2009/world_aids_20091130/en/index.html


"In 2006, WHO recommended that ARVs be provided to HIV-positive pregnant women in the third trimester (beginning at 28 weeks) to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. At the time, there was insufficient evidence on the protective effect of ARVs during breastfeeding. Since then, several clinical trials have shown the efficacy of ARVs in preventing transmission to the infant while breastfeeding. The 2009 recommendations promote the use of ARVs earlier in pregnancy, starting at 14 weeks and continuing through the end of the breastfeeding period.

WHO now recommends that breastfeeding continue until the infant is 12 months of age, provided the HIV-positive mother or baby is taking ARVs during that period. This will reduce the risk of HIV transmission and improve the infant's chance of survival.

"In the new recommendations, we are sending a clear message that breastfeeding is a good option for every baby, even those with HIV-positive mothers, when they have access to ARVs," said Daisy Mafubelu, WHO's Assistant Director General for Family and Community Health."


Quoting anime.princess:

None of those outlets are reliable sources.  Just pick a basic biology book that talks about viruses.  Don't try to feed me with your lack of knowledge.  


Quoting tabi_cat1023:

Not according to UNC CHapel Hill's recent studies

http://www.naturalnews.com/036382_breast_milk_AIDS_HIV.html

http://now.msn.com/breast-milk-has-superpowers-even-you-didnt-realize

This is current research from reliable sources


Quoting anime.princess:

You're are sooooo wrong.  That virus passes through the milk; it is not destroyed.  


Quoting tabi_cat1023:

Actually its being shown that bfing with hiv can protect babies..that bm kills the virus so i dunno there





Quoting anime.princess:

That's good, as long as she's not HIV+ or has Hepatits. 









orangeshirt
by on Aug. 30, 2012 at 6:25 PM
Maybe I stepped into newcomers by accident. How else to explain name-calling and outright rude comments?
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
MaryJarrett
by Silver Member on Aug. 30, 2012 at 6:29 PM
2 moms liked this


http://www.plospathogens.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.ppat.1002739


This was referenced in the links you posted. It has 90 references to check. I haven't looked at all of them but this is the link from your MSN one. It seems the other poster didn't even care to look into this. This one is very educationally valuable. It was conducted by The North Carolina School of Medicine. I'd say that your links are trustworthy after checking into the references they listed. :) But, of course, I always check before I speak. I don't like being behind. :) :)  

Quoting tabi_cat1023:



Thats why I shared them, especially the one from MSN

Quoting MaryJarrett:

The articles you posted are much easier to read and share. :) I honesty like yours articles better.

Quoting tabi_cat1023:

Thank you! I know i wasnt nuts here!




Quoting MaryJarrett:

So the World Health Organization recommending that even mother's with HIV/AIDs breastfeed is what?





http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2009/world_aids_20091130/en/index.html








"In 2006, WHO recommended that ARVs be provided to HIV-positive pregnant women in the third trimester (beginning at 28 weeks) to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. At the time, there was insufficient evidence on the protective effect of ARVs during breastfeeding. Since then, several clinical trials have shown the efficacy of ARVs in preventing transmission to the infant while breastfeeding. The 2009 recommendations promote the use of ARVs earlier in pregnancy, starting at 14 weeks and continuing through the end of the breastfeeding period.





WHO now recommends that breastfeeding continue until the infant is 12 months of age, provided the HIV-positive mother or baby is taking ARVs during that period. This will reduce the risk of HIV transmission and improve the infant's chance of survival.





"In the new recommendations, we are sending a clear message that breastfeeding is a good option for every baby, even those with HIV-positive mothers, when they have access to ARVs," said Daisy Mafubelu, WHO's Assistant Director General for Family and Community Health."








Quoting anime.princess:

None of those outlets are reliable sources.  Just pick a basic biology book that talks about viruses.  Don't try to feed me with your lack of knowledge.  




Quoting tabi_cat1023:

Not according to UNC CHapel Hill's recent studies

http://www.naturalnews.com/036382_breast_milk_AIDS_HIV.html

http://now.msn.com/breast-milk-has-superpowers-even-you-didnt-realize

This is current research from reliable sources




Quoting anime.princess:

You're are sooooo wrong.  That virus passes through the milk; it is not destroyed.  




Quoting tabi_cat1023:

Actually its being shown that bfing with hiv can protect babies..that bm kills the virus so i dunno there











Quoting anime.princess:

That's good, as long as she's not HIV+ or has Hepatits. 












I'm Mary married(since 10-5-08) to Dallen, mommy to Serenity(2008) & Caidence(2010). Christian, SAHM, Full- term breast feeding, Cloth diapering, Vaccinating, Anti-CIO/Sleep-training, Natural birthing, holistic loving, AP, ERF, Bedsharing/co-sleepingresearch-loving kinda mama.

MaryJarrett
by Silver Member on Aug. 30, 2012 at 6:39 PM

*Below* 5%. :) Let's read all of it.  

You are saying it *will* still pass. That IS false. It has a 95% chance of NOT passing. I said that in my post (which is probably where you are getting it from since you seem not so keen on checking).

That is your opinion that it isn't worth it.

Based on all the potential risks of formula usage, it would be my opinion (which is supported by the World Health Organization as linked below) to breastfeed. I tend to stick with the pros on this stuff. Best practice advice based in facts and studies, not on myths and old ill conceived theories. There are a lot of myths in the realm of pathology, especially the pathology of something misunderstood as HIV/AIDs. A lot of people believe that HIV and AIDs are the same thing, but you can have HIV for years without having AIDs. AIDs is only when your CD4 drops below 200. We're here to spread the most recent developments in the breastfeeding world. What you are saying is outdated and untrue. Good luck to you! :)  

Quoting anime.princess:

It is not 100% safe anyways; 95% safe, perhaps but not worth the risk.  It will still pass, regardless of the medication taken.   Looks like that part of the article YOU didn't read it.

Quoting MaryJarrett:

Did you read it? They are being treated with antiretroviral medications. These medications are also past through the breastmilk, which combines with breastmilk's natural ability to fight diseases. The recommendation before this was for mothers with HIV/AIDs to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months, then once solids were introduced to switch to formula. That goes along the same basis that breastmilk does help STOP the virus. Those studies showed that as long as the baby was only recieving mothers milk the baby was protected. This recent study has shown that even once solids are introduced the baby is still protected.
Not treated mothers transfer rates to children are between 15-45%. Treated mothers transfer rates are below 5%. It is fairly safe to breast feed with HIV/AIDs.
Not only that but scientists are researching ways to heat treat human milk so that it will be free of diseases, including HIV/AIDs. This is still new and in testing stages. I pray that it works. Yes, it will kill some of the goodness of the human milk BUT it would be just the same as scorching milk with excess lipase to prevent breakdown during storage. Still better nutritionally that formula, so to say.   

Also, you mention Hepatitis, there are multiple strains for Hep. Here is what WHO has to say on Hep B. 

:
"Risk of transmission by breastfeeding 

Breastfeeding has been suggested as an additional mechanism by which infants may acquire 

HBV infection, because small amounts of Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) have been 

detected in some samples of breastmilk. However, there is no evidence that breastfeeding 

increases the risk of mother to child transmission. A follow up study of 147 infants born to 

mothers known to be carriers of HBV in Taiwan (4) found similar rates of HBV infection in 92 

children who were breastfed compared to 55 who were bottle fed. A study in Britain, involving 

126 subjects, also showed no additional risk for breastfed versus non breastfed infants of carrier 

mothers (5). This study included the measurement of HBeAg status of the mothers, but found no 

association between maternal e-antigen status and transmission rates. These findings suggest 

strongly that any risk of transmission associated with breastmilk is negligible compared to the 

high risk of exposure to maternal blood and body fluids at birth. Experts on hepatitis, however, 

do have concerns that breast pathology such as cracked or bleeding nipples or lesions with serous 

exudates could expose the infant to infectious doses of HBV. " 



 

Quoting anime.princess:

The virus can be passed throught the milk.  I don't know how the fuck they came up with those studies.  

Quoting MaryJarrett:

So the World Health Organization recommending that even mother's with HIV/AIDs breastfeed is what?

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2009/world_aids_20091130/en/index.html


"In 2006, WHO recommended that ARVs be provided to HIV-positive pregnant women in the third trimester (beginning at 28 weeks) to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. At the time, there was insufficient evidence on the protective effect of ARVs during breastfeeding. Since then, several clinical trials have shown the efficacy of ARVs in preventing transmission to the infant while breastfeeding. The 2009 recommendations promote the use of ARVs earlier in pregnancy, starting at 14 weeks and continuing through the end of the breastfeeding period.

WHO now recommends that breastfeeding continue until the infant is 12 months of age, provided the HIV-positive mother or baby is taking ARVs during that period. This will reduce the risk of HIV transmission and improve the infant's chance of survival.

"In the new recommendations, we are sending a clear message that breastfeeding is a good option for every baby, even those with HIV-positive mothers, when they have access to ARVs," said Daisy Mafubelu, WHO's Assistant Director General for Family and Community Health."


Quoting anime.princess:

None of those outlets are reliable sources.  Just pick a basic biology book that talks about viruses.  Don't try to feed me with your lack of knowledge.  


Quoting tabi_cat1023:

Not according to UNC CHapel Hill's recent studies

http://www.naturalnews.com/036382_breast_milk_AIDS_HIV.html

http://now.msn.com/breast-milk-has-superpowers-even-you-didnt-realize

This is current research from reliable sources


Quoting anime.princess:

You're are sooooo wrong.  That virus passes through the milk; it is not destroyed.  


Quoting tabi_cat1023:

Actually its being shown that bfing with hiv can protect babies..that bm kills the virus so i dunno there





Quoting anime.princess:

That's good, as long as she's not HIV+ or has Hepatits. 










I'm Mary married(since 10-5-08) to Dallen, mommy to Serenity(2008) & Caidence(2010). Christian, SAHM, Full- term breast feeding, Cloth diapering, Vaccinating, Anti-CIO/Sleep-training, Natural birthing, holistic loving, AP, ERF, Bedsharing/co-sleepingresearch-loving kinda mama.

anime.princess
by on Aug. 30, 2012 at 7:19 PM

What about that less than 5%? It can still pass. 

Quoting MaryJarrett:

*Below* 5%. :) Let's read all of it.  

You are saying it *will* still pass. That IS false. It has a 95% chance of NOT passing. I said that in my post (which is probably where you are getting it from since you seem not so keen on checking).

That is your opinion that it isn't worth it.

Based on all the potential risks of formula usage, it would be my opinion (which is supported by the World Health Organization as linked below) to breastfeed. I tend to stick with the pros on this stuff. Best practice advice based in facts and studies, not on myths and old ill conceived theories. There are a lot of myths in the realm of pathology, especially the pathology of something misunderstood as HIV/AIDs. A lot of people believe that HIV and AIDs are the same thing, but you can have HIV for years without having AIDs. AIDs is only when your CD4 drops below 200. We're here to spread the most recent developments in the breastfeeding world. What you are saying is outdated and untrue. Good luck to you! :)  

Quoting anime.princess:

It is not 100% safe anyways; 95% safe, perhaps but not worth the risk.  It will still pass, regardless of the medication taken.   Looks like that part of the article YOU didn't read it.

Quoting MaryJarrett:

Did you read it? They are being treated with antiretroviral medications. These medications are also past through the breastmilk, which combines with breastmilk's natural ability to fight diseases. The recommendation before this was for mothers with HIV/AIDs to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months, then once solids were introduced to switch to formula. That goes along the same basis that breastmilk does help STOP the virus. Those studies showed that as long as the baby was only recieving mothers milk the baby was protected. This recent study has shown that even once solids are introduced the baby is still protected.
Not treated mothers transfer rates to children are between 15-45%. Treated mothers transfer rates are below 5%. It is fairly safe to breast feed with HIV/AIDs.
Not only that but scientists are researching ways to heat treat human milk so that it will be free of diseases, including HIV/AIDs. This is still new and in testing stages. I pray that it works. Yes, it will kill some of the goodness of the human milk BUT it would be just the same as scorching milk with excess lipase to prevent breakdown during storage. Still better nutritionally that formula, so to say.   

Also, you mention Hepatitis, there are multiple strains for Hep. Here is what WHO has to say on Hep B. 

:
"Risk of transmission by breastfeeding 

Breastfeeding has been suggested as an additional mechanism by which infants may acquire 

HBV infection, because small amounts of Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) have been 

detected in some samples of breastmilk. However, there is no evidence that breastfeeding 

increases the risk of mother to child transmission. A follow up study of 147 infants born to 

mothers known to be carriers of HBV in Taiwan (4) found similar rates of HBV infection in 92 

children who were breastfed compared to 55 who were bottle fed. A study in Britain, involving 

126 subjects, also showed no additional risk for breastfed versus non breastfed infants of carrier 

mothers (5). This study included the measurement of HBeAg status of the mothers, but found no 

association between maternal e-antigen status and transmission rates. These findings suggest 

strongly that any risk of transmission associated with breastmilk is negligible compared to the 

high risk of exposure to maternal blood and body fluids at birth. Experts on hepatitis, however, 

do have concerns that breast pathology such as cracked or bleeding nipples or lesions with serous 

exudates could expose the infant to infectious doses of HBV. " 



 

Quoting anime.princess:

The virus can be passed throught the milk.  I don't know how the fuck they came up with those studies.  

Quoting MaryJarrett:

So the World Health Organization recommending that even mother's with HIV/AIDs breastfeed is what?

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2009/world_aids_20091130/en/index.html


"In 2006, WHO recommended that ARVs be provided to HIV-positive pregnant women in the third trimester (beginning at 28 weeks) to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. At the time, there was insufficient evidence on the protective effect of ARVs during breastfeeding. Since then, several clinical trials have shown the efficacy of ARVs in preventing transmission to the infant while breastfeeding. The 2009 recommendations promote the use of ARVs earlier in pregnancy, starting at 14 weeks and continuing through the end of the breastfeeding period.

WHO now recommends that breastfeeding continue until the infant is 12 months of age, provided the HIV-positive mother or baby is taking ARVs during that period. This will reduce the risk of HIV transmission and improve the infant's chance of survival.

"In the new recommendations, we are sending a clear message that breastfeeding is a good option for every baby, even those with HIV-positive mothers, when they have access to ARVs," said Daisy Mafubelu, WHO's Assistant Director General for Family and Community Health."


Quoting anime.princess:

None of those outlets are reliable sources.  Just pick a basic biology book that talks about viruses.  Don't try to feed me with your lack of knowledge.  


Quoting tabi_cat1023:

Not according to UNC CHapel Hill's recent studies

http://www.naturalnews.com/036382_breast_milk_AIDS_HIV.html

http://now.msn.com/breast-milk-has-superpowers-even-you-didnt-realize

This is current research from reliable sources


Quoting anime.princess:

You're are sooooo wrong.  That virus passes through the milk; it is not destroyed.  


Quoting tabi_cat1023:

Actually its being shown that bfing with hiv can protect babies..that bm kills the virus so i dunno there





Quoting anime.princess:

That's good, as long as she's not HIV+ or has Hepatits. 











orangeshirt
by on Aug. 30, 2012 at 7:32 PM
Read carefully, please. The statistic of less than 5% refers to the transmission in utero or via birth, not the feeding practices. In the following sentence it states that the earlier start COMBINED with safe infant feeding practices can further improve outcomes.
Quoting anime.princess:


Precious333
by Gold Member on Aug. 30, 2012 at 7:36 PM

I have to say I am pleasantly surprised. There is still hope yet for our society!

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