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Going cold turkey....

Posted by on Nov. 15, 2012 at 1:47 AM
  • 16 Replies

Mrs.Salz post on toddler quitting sugar got me motivated to do the same. I left my 27 month old at my MILs house for an hr while I took my 2 wk old to a doctors appointment. When I came back, I walked in on my 2 yr old finishing a whole Hershey's chocolate bar. Eating one of those makes ME sick. And dd pretty much ate it for a meal. So I told dh about it and we decided have dd go cold turkey on the sugar. We didn't realize how much candy she was actually eating!! We knew she had some every day, but we didn't realize how it was affecting her until we actually stopped to think about it. Too much sugar makes her downright mean and full of attitude. 

day 1 was a little bit horrible. She was moody and going through withdrawals. She was asking for candy all day long. 

Today was day 2. Dd was getting cranky on the way back home from church so I gave her the snack bag. Little did I know what was hidden at the bottom of it (from another day). Dd found it. A little stick of "Bit O Honey". She seriously reminded me of an addict the way she was holding onto it and trying to eat the candy THROUGH the wrapper.  :/

Excuse the fuzziness. 

Aside from the first bout of moodiness, she does seem to be doing better already. Time will tell :)

by on Nov. 15, 2012 at 1:47 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Lynette
by Bronze Member on Nov. 15, 2012 at 1:51 AM

Fresh fruit helped me a lot in the beginning.  Apples & oranges were good when eaten together.  I know it's hard but you are doing great w/ your little one.

littlelambe2
by on Nov. 15, 2012 at 1:59 AM


Quoting Lynette:

Fresh fruit helped me a lot in the beginning.  Apples & oranges were good when eaten together.  I know it's hard but you are doing great w/ your little one.

Thanks!! We've already discovered that fruit is helping. 

Mrs.Salz
by Platinum Member on Nov. 15, 2012 at 12:22 PM
1 mom liked this

Good for you mama! The first few days are the hardest!

She might need extra fats (olive and coconut oils, butter, etc.) and protein to help with the cravings. They help me a lot when I eat a bunch of sugar and then go through a withdrawal.

melindabelcher
by mel on Nov. 15, 2012 at 3:32 PM
Way to go!
I cant wait to get my own place my kids are going to be miserable but all the junk is gone!!!!!!
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amazzonia
by Bronze Member on Nov. 15, 2012 at 3:53 PM

To me is never good taking away anything from kids, I don't know how much sugar your kid was eating, but a little some times is better than taking it all away, they'll end up growing up craving sweets, and when they'll be old enough to buy they own candies, you'll find yourself with overweight kids because they will want to eat all the candies they where deprived as little kids. I'm from Italy and I still can't get why American are so obsessed in taking one kind of food out from their diet, no carbs, no gluten, no sugar....nothing is bad if you don't go overboard, but everything can be bad if exaggerate, even taking all the sugars out from a kids diet 

littlelambe2
by on Nov. 15, 2012 at 4:28 PM

We're not taking away all sugars. We're just limiting refined sugars and temporarily taking them away to reset her cravings. She still has as much access to natural sugar and fruits as she wants. She didn't have sugar for the first year of her life, and up until recently, she had a pretty healthy relationship with sweets. We were fine with dd having treats when going to her grandparents house, etc. but it got out of control because certain people do not understand what an appropriate amount for a child is.Wwhen you realize a 22 lb 2 year old is eating an entire bar of chocolate, or 2 oz of jelly Bellys.... When you think of how small her tummy is, she's pretty much eating a meal of candy. Processed refined sugar garbage. Not one ounce of nutritional value to it. I was raised with limited sugar and processed foods and I'm not obese nor am I a sugar or junk food binge eater. My siblings are the same. I hope to raise dd the same way. Dh's family had unlimited access to sweets and processed foods growing up and they are now all overweight and have serious food relationship issues (except dh who was disciplined enough to change his own eating habits). It's important for a child to have good food and learn healthy eating habits. In my personal experience, and real life observation, I find that those children who grew up on real food and limited garbage are healthier and don't have food issues at adults. 

And about no sugar equals craving sweets? Uh no. The only time I've ever craved sweets was during one of my pregnancies. When your body isn't used to it, your body doesn't crave it. 

Quoting amazzonia:

To me is never good taking away anything from kids, I don't know how much sugar your kid was eating, but a little some times is better than taking it all away, they'll end up growing up craving sweets, and when they'll be old enough to buy they own candies, you'll find yourself with overweight kids because they will want to eat all the candies they where deprived as little kids. I'm from Italy and I still can't get why American are so obsessed in taking one kind of food out from their diet, no carbs, no gluten, no sugar....nothing is bad if you don't go overboard, but everything can be bad if exaggerate, even taking all the sugars out from a kids diet 


amazzonia
by Bronze Member on Nov. 15, 2012 at 4:41 PM

I understand not wanting her to eat a bar of chocolate, but I don't see anything wrong in once in a while, my dd eat candies in a range of twice a week I wold say, they are healthy, happy and no sugar addiction, I just don't see why a kid should be deprived from candies, all kids love candies, we all loved candies as kids, and I just don't see any reason to be so extreme, just teach them to be wise and that moderation is the key to everything in life, a sucker once a week will not kill her. Maybe instead of not letting her eat candies you should tell her grandparents not to give her any, and just allow her to have some when she's with you....I just hate extremes, and I don't see any point in it 

Quoting littlelambe2:

We're not taking away all sugars. We're just limiting refined sugars and temporarily taking them away to reset her cravings. She still has as much access to natural sugar and fruits as she wants. She didn't have sugar for the first year of her life, and up until recently, she had a pretty healthy relationship with sweets. We were fine with dd having treats when going to her grandparents house, etc. but it got out of control because certain people do not understand what an appropriate amount for a child is.Wwhen you realize a 22 lb 2 year old is eating an entire bar of chocolate, or 2 oz of jelly Bellys.... When you think of how small her tummy is, she's pretty much eating a meal of candy. Processed refined sugar garbage. Not one ounce of nutritional value to it. I was raised with limited sugar and processed foods and I'm not obese nor am I a sugar or junk food binge eater. My siblings are the same. I hope to raise dd the same way. Dh's family had unlimited access to sweets and processed foods growing up and they are now all overweight and have serious food relationship issues (except dh who was disciplined enough to change his own eating habits). It's important for a child to have good food and learn healthy eating habits. In my personal experience, and real life observation, I find that those children who grew up on real food and limited garbage are healthier and don't have food issues at adults. 

And about no sugar equals craving sweets? Uh no. The only time I've ever craved sweets was during one of my pregnancies. When your body isn't used to it, your body doesn't crave it. 

Quoting amazzonia:

To me is never good taking away anything from kids, I don't know how much sugar your kid was eating, but a little some times is better than taking it all away, they'll end up growing up craving sweets, and when they'll be old enough to buy they own candies, you'll find yourself with overweight kids because they will want to eat all the candies they where deprived as little kids. I'm from Italy and I still can't get why American are so obsessed in taking one kind of food out from their diet, no carbs, no gluten, no sugar....nothing is bad if you don't go overboard, but everything can be bad if exaggerate, even taking all the sugars out from a kids diet 



I understand t

hapababies
by Silver Member on Nov. 15, 2012 at 5:05 PM
1 mom liked this
In the USA, we are a country of contradictions.
On one side we have the obese parents who have obese children. Their diets consist of processed and fast foods. The "healthiest" meals they get all day are those provided by the schools, which are the bare minimum of what the FDA recommends and is often processed foods. Very rarely so these children see fresh foods or have home cooked meals made from scratch.
On the other side we have adults and children starving themselves to look like Victoria secrets models and mr universe.
Then there lays the middle ground, which is mostly people in this group. We try to limit the sweets and processed food. It's an effort because it's so much easier to go through the drive thru or pick up frozen dinners after a long, tiring day. We, generally speaking, aren't trying to be extreme in our children's diets but want our children to grow up to the healthiest that they can be.
Moderation is key, you are right, but excessiveness so tempting. Look at the holidays... Americans spend millions of dollars on halloween candy, Christmas treats, thanksgiving dinner, Easter candy...etc. Those holidays only come around once a year, yet Americans manage to gain weight around those times.
As for gluten, that tends to be an allergy or digestive issue as to why parents limit or remove it from their childrens diets.


Quoting amazzonia:

To me is never good taking away anything from kids, I don't know how much sugar your kid was eating, but a little some times is better than taking it all away, they'll end up growing up craving sweets, and when they'll be old enough to buy they own candies, you'll find yourself with overweight kids because they will want to eat all the candies they where deprived as little kids. I'm from Italy and I still can't get why American are so obsessed in taking one kind of food out from their diet, no carbs, no gluten, no sugar....nothing is bad if you don't go overboard, but everything can be bad if exaggerate, even taking all the sugars out from a kids diet 


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littlelambe2
by on Nov. 15, 2012 at 5:28 PM
1 mom liked this

This is what we were doing. But we realized she was actually getting candy everyday, sometimes a couple times a day, and overall, way too much. We thought about just cutting back, but eliminating it for a while so it had a chance to get out of her system seemed to be the best course of actiont. It would be a fight only for a day or two instead of a fight daily every time we'd say "not now". Once her system isn't used to having so much sugar everyday, it won't be a problem to have it occasionally. 

Quoting amazzonia:

I understand not wanting her to eat a bar of chocolate, but I don't see anything wrong in once in a while, my dd eat candies in a range of twice a week I wold say, they are healthy, happy and no sugar addiction, I just don't see why a kid should be deprived from candies, all kids love candies, we all loved candies as kids, and I just don't see any reason to be so extreme, just teach them to be wise and that moderation is the key to everything in life, a sucker once a week will not kill her. Maybe instead of not letting her eat candies you should tell her grandparents not to give her any, and just allow her to have some when she's with you....I just hate extremes, and I don't see any point in it 

Quoting littlelambe2:

We're not taking away all sugars. We're just limiting refined sugars and temporarily taking them away to reset her cravings. She still has as much access to natural sugar and fruits as she wants. She didn't have sugar for the first year of her life, and up until recently, she had a pretty healthy relationship with sweets. We were fine with dd having treats when going to her grandparents house, etc. but it got out of control because certain people do not understand what an appropriate amount for a child is.Wwhen you realize a 22 lb 2 year old is eating an entire bar of chocolate, or 2 oz of jelly Bellys.... When you think of how small her tummy is, she's pretty much eating a meal of candy. Processed refined sugar garbage. Not one ounce of nutritional value to it. I was raised with limited sugar and processed foods and I'm not obese nor am I a sugar or junk food binge eater. My siblings are the same. I hope to raise dd the same way. Dh's family had unlimited access to sweets and processed foods growing up and they are now all overweight and have serious food relationship issues (except dh who was disciplined enough to change his own eating habits). It's important for a child to have good food and learn healthy eating habits. In my personal experience, and real life observation, I find that those children who grew up on real food and limited garbage are healthier and don't have food issues at adults. 

And about no sugar equals craving sweets? Uh no. The only time I've ever craved sweets was during one of my pregnancies. When your body isn't used to it, your body doesn't crave it. 

Quoting amazzonia:

To me is never good taking away anything from kids, I don't know how much sugar your kid was eating, but a little some times is better than taking it all away, they'll end up growing up craving sweets, and when they'll be old enough to buy they own candies, you'll find yourself with overweight kids because they will want to eat all the candies they where deprived as little kids. I'm from Italy and I still can't get why American are so obsessed in taking one kind of food out from their diet, no carbs, no gluten, no sugar....nothing is bad if you don't go overboard, but everything can be bad if exaggerate, even taking all the sugars out from a kids diet 



I understand t


Sarah725
by Group Mod - Sarah on Nov. 15, 2012 at 9:32 PM

 Good for you.  I need to do that for myself and for my family.

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