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Legitimate placental deterioration

Posted by on Dec. 19, 2012 at 8:22 AM
  • 12 Replies

Give me some examples, please. A woman in one of my ddgs was told with her first that she had that and they induced at 37 weeks. Currently she's 24 wks and they are telling her the placenta will only last until 31-35 wks. She has some 'serious blood flow problems'.

by on Dec. 19, 2012 at 8:22 AM
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SadieJames
by Bronze Member on Dec. 19, 2012 at 8:56 AM

I've got nothing for placenta but I know my SIL only had a 2 vessel cord and they induced early (35 wks I believe) based on an ultrasound showing a small blockage in the artery.  Once she delivered they examined the cord and actually showed us pictures of the clot.  Had she carried to term the clot may have either dislodged and caused serious harm or blocked the artery and caused my niece to be stillborn.  I'm not entirely sure but I believe she has some issues that led them to closely monitor her pregnancy anyways.

JoJoBean8
by Group Mod on Dec. 19, 2012 at 9:08 AM
Bump
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gamelas
by on Dec. 19, 2012 at 9:46 AM
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placental deterioration is not a "light switch"  that imediately goes off and "poof" the placenta is bad.  It's actually very rare.  When a palcenta is really not functioning well the signs are often seen earlier rather than later.  I will say "placenta deterioration" has become one of the new excuses I am hearing with OB and some MW's wanting to induce.  These are usually full term 38+ week moms.  Some people believe the placenta NEEDs to slow up a little bit and that is actually part of the process to trigger labor.

 

In a peterm baby with cord or placenta annomolies usually you see grow rates slow or cease in an early baby - that *can* be a valid reason to intervene with the pregnancy.  However I would prefer to have them be on "watch adn wait" and monitor the babies growth and development rather than putting mom on an automatic date stamp.  I have had moms with cysts on the cords - diagnosed early on and then "dissapear" later and go full term.  So lots can happen.  I think if they have concerns it warrents closely following the situaiton - but not necessarily setting a date 10+ weeks away as a "done" point KWIM?

joyful_mama
by Bronze Member on Dec. 19, 2012 at 9:57 AM

This was my understanding. Do you have any good info links I could pass along?

Quoting gamelas:

placental deterioration is not a "light switch"  that imediately goes off and "poof" the placenta is bad.  It's actually very rare.  When a palcenta is really not functioning well the signs are often seen earlier rather than later.  I will say "placenta deterioration" has become one of the new excuses I am hearing with OB and some MW's wanting to induce.  These are usually full term 38+ week moms.  Some people believe the placenta NEEDs to slow up a little bit and that is actually part of the process to trigger labor.


In a peterm baby with cord or placenta annomolies usually you see grow rates slow or cease in an early baby - that *can* be a valid reason to intervene with the pregnancy.  However I would prefer to have them be on "watch adn wait" and monitor the babies growth and development rather than putting mom on an automatic date stamp.  I have had moms with cysts on the cords - diagnosed early on and then "dissapear" later and go full term.  So lots can happen.  I think if they have concerns it warrents closely following the situaiton - but not necessarily setting a date 10+ weeks away as a "done" point KWIM?


Mrs.Salz
by Platinum Member on Dec. 19, 2012 at 10:54 AM

I've never been able to find any reputable links about this topic :(

I don't see how it's possible to determine how much longer a placenta will function - the only way I am aware of is to check the baby as pregnancy progresses and determine from there whether an induction is needed.

GoodyBrook
by Silver Member on Dec. 19, 2012 at 11:04 AM

In addition, aren't we able to build up stronger, healthier placentas by eating iron-rich foods throughout pregnancy--and especially in the first 4 months?  And aren't a lot of mama's blood flow problems due to the lack of a protein-rich diet?

joyful_mama
by Bronze Member on Dec. 19, 2012 at 12:00 PM

http://www.livestrong.com/article/13343-identify-placental-insufficiency/

Midwifery text book page

Found those.The rest of the links I've seen are to message board discussions. this post was on the list! :)

hapababies
by Silver Member on Dec. 19, 2012 at 12:04 PM
I had placental deterioration but that was due to a partial placental abruption at 17 weeks gestation. My son was diagnosed with Intra uterine growth retardation at 25 weeks.
I had bleeding throughout my pregnancy.
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H.I.S.
by on Dec. 19, 2012 at 6:41 PM

BUMP!

kierasmommy
by on Dec. 19, 2012 at 7:08 PM
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I was told with my dd that she had iUGR due to my HG and placenta deterioration. They wanted to induce me at 37 weeks. I refused. She came naturally, on her due date, weighing 6 lbs 10 oz. My placenta was perfectly fine.
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