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Natural Birth & Parenting Natural Birth & Parenting

Birth plans?

Posted by on Mar. 21, 2013 at 10:45 PM
  • 8 Replies

Do you do them?  What are some things that are absolute musts for a good birth plan? 

I've never done one, kinda always just went with the flow and whatever was best for babies.   3 of my kiddos were born early as well as having pre-term labor and having it stopped multiple times, and PROM with those 3.   Labor never began after my water broke or never intensified so all 3 of those were augmentations with Pitocin, the other 2 kids were full on inductions with only Pitocin for medical reasons.   I've had epi's with all of them & hated being stuck in the bed.

I'm determined to do things different this time around, for starters my SO is very, very supportive and will do everything he possibly can to make things easier for me, we've hired a doula already & both love her, so that alone will make a huge difference I'm sure.   I also have a different OB and will be delivering at a different hospital only because I moved across country from where all my other babies were born.   

I also have a history of long labors and am considered high risk...so help me mommas, I'm at a loss with this birth plan thing.   My doula will help write one, but wants me to come up with some ideas first.   I'm only certain of what I DON'T want lol.

by on Mar. 21, 2013 at 10:45 PM
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larissalarie
by on Mar. 21, 2013 at 11:00 PM
1 mom liked this
Listing what you DON'T want is a great start! Then look into why and maybe look for the counter of what you DO want.

I'm sure the mamas in here will have great input for you. I've never done a birth plan since I've been able to do natural without, so I'm not much help :-)

Definitely start researching things like inductions and why the doc might CLAIM it's necessary, and then learn why more often than not it's unnecessary.
Also remember that you are always in charge, the doctor can't "let" or "make" you do anything!
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littlelambe2
by on Mar. 21, 2013 at 11:09 PM

Start with what you don't want. Find out what your on policies and hospital policies are. If there are differences, write those in your birthplan in a positive way. For example, at my hospital, it is hospital policy to place baby on the mothers chest immediately following birth for an uncomplicated delivery. That's what I want, but because its standard, I don't include it in my birthplan. It is hospital policy to give an IV, or at very least a saline lock. Both of these are things that I don't want unless its absolutely necessary. So, in my birth plan, I wrote "I do not consent to an IV or saline lock unless medically necessary." You really have to do your research and find in what instances things are medically necessary. Seeing as your high risk, you may need an IV, but perhaps you could compromise with a saline lock.

Possible things to put in your birthplan are freedom to move during labor, and freedom to push in any safe position that you feel comfortable in at the time (as opposed to the lithotomy position). Think of routine procedures done with baby. Do you want to be able to nurse first before these procedures are done? Do you want to delay vaccinations or any other procedure?

you basically want to include those things that you know are important to you, don't exactly follow hospital (or your doctor's) default standards, and that would happen when your hooped up on hormones. Something like baby not being taken to the nursery at night is something you could fight for after your done with you labor, and isn't really a must for a birth plan. While not offering pain meds during labor would be something to include because you would be in a very vulnerable state during labor. Kwim? Lastly, go over it with your OB. Discuss it, change it if necessary, and get him/her to sign it and scan it into your chart. A signed birthplan goes a lot further than just a printout because it shows agreement from your doctor.

hope this helps. Sorry for the ramble. 

jconney80
by Group Mod on Mar. 21, 2013 at 11:19 PM
1 mom liked this
Everything they said above! Dr Sears wife, Martha Sears, has a good book called The Birth Book and she teaches you how to write a good birth plan.

The best thing to do is figure out what you want and don't want then go from there. You want to include your wishes on things that will help breastfeeding and bonding as well
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Roomfor1more
by on Mar. 22, 2013 at 12:02 AM

Thank you for the info..I never would have thought to have my OB sign it!   I know things will be different this time around, my SO alone is my rock (my ex was a douche lol) plus having a certified doula with us to assist will also help.   My OB is very laid back & doesn't put mom on a clock, if you're willing to labor for 3 days, as long as baby is safe he will allow you to do your thing & will only step in if there is a real risk to mom or baby.   Plus we're going to labor at home as long as possible, so hopefully those things alone will make a huge difference, but you've given tips on things I hadn't thought about.

Thanks again.

Quoting littlelambe2:

Start with what you don't want. Find out what your on policies and hospital policies are. If there are differences, write those in your birthplan in a positive way. For example, at my hospital, it is hospital policy to place baby on the mothers chest immediately following birth for an uncomplicated delivery. That's what I want, but because its standard, I don't include it in my birthplan. It is hospital policy to give an IV, or at very least a saline lock. Both of these are things that I don't want unless its absolutely necessary. So, in my birth plan, I wrote "I do not consent to an IV or saline lock unless medically necessary." You really have to do your research and find in what instances things are medically necessary. Seeing as your high risk, you may need an IV, but perhaps you could compromise with a saline lock.

Possible things to put in your birthplan are freedom to move during labor, and freedom to push in any safe position that you feel comfortable in at the time (as opposed to the lithotomy position). Think of routine procedures done with baby. Do you want to be able to nurse first before these procedures are done? Do you want to delay vaccinations or any other procedure?

you basically want to include those things that you know are important to you, don't exactly follow hospital (or your doctor's) default standards, and that would happen when your hooped up on hormones. Something like baby not being taken to the nursery at night is something you could fight for after your done with you labor, and isn't really a must for a birth plan. While not offering pain meds during labor would be something to include because you would be in a very vulnerable state during labor. Kwim? Lastly, go over it with your OB. Discuss it, change it if necessary, and get him/her to sign it and scan it into your chart. A signed birthplan goes a lot further than just a printout because it shows agreement from your doctor.

hope this helps. Sorry for the ramble. 


littlelambe2
by on Mar. 22, 2013 at 12:58 AM

That's awesome. It sounds like you're set up pretty good. Glad I could help!


Quoting Roomfor1more:

Thank you for the info..I never would have thought to have my OB sign it!   I know things will be different this time around, my SO alone is my rock (my ex was a douche lol) plus having a certified doula with us to assist will also help.   My OB is very laid back & doesn't put mom on a clock, if you're willing to labor for 3 days, as long as baby is safe he will allow you to do your thing & will only step in if there is a real risk to mom or baby.   Plus we're going to labor at home as long as possible, so hopefully those things alone will make a huge difference, but you've given tips on things I hadn't thought about.

Thanks again.

Quoting littlelambe2:

Start with what you don't want. Find out what your on policies and hospital policies are. If there are differences, write those in your birthplan in a positive way. For example, at my hospital, it is hospital policy to place baby on the mothers chest immediately following birth for an uncomplicated delivery. That's what I want, but because its standard, I don't include it in my birthplan. It is hospital policy to give an IV, or at very least a saline lock. Both of these are things that I don't want unless its absolutely necessary. So, in my birth plan, I wrote "I do not consent to an IV or saline lock unless medically necessary." You really have to do your research and find in what instances things are medically necessary. Seeing as your high risk, you may need an IV, but perhaps you could compromise with a saline lock.

Possible things to put in your birthplan are freedom to move during labor, and freedom to push in any safe position that you feel comfortable in at the time (as opposed to the lithotomy position). Think of routine procedures done with baby. Do you want to be able to nurse first before these procedures are done? Do you want to delay vaccinations or any other procedure?

you basically want to include those things that you know are important to you, don't exactly follow hospital (or your doctor's) default standards, and that would happen when your hooped up on hormones. Something like baby not being taken to the nursery at night is something you could fight for after your done with you labor, and isn't really a must for a birth plan. While not offering pain meds during labor would be something to include because you would be in a very vulnerable state during labor. Kwim? Lastly, go over it with your OB. Discuss it, change it if necessary, and get him/her to sign it and scan it into your chart. A signed birthplan goes a lot further than just a printout because it shows agreement from your doctor.

hope this helps. Sorry for the ramble. 




Mrs.Salz
by on Mar. 22, 2013 at 8:56 AM

I spent most of my labor at home so my birth plan for my hospital birth was mainly about my newborn care preferences (no hep B or vit k shots, no formula or pacifiers, no circ etc).

Knowing what you don't want is a great place to start.

Terpsichore
by Member on Mar. 22, 2013 at 1:09 PM

My birth plan writing involves a few steps. First step is to write everything down, no censoring. The second step is to pare down the unnecessary and censor it. By censor I mean reword or take out stuff that says "If you do something to my baby without my informed consent I will sue the hell out of you." But writing that stuff down in the first place helps me sort out my thoughts better. Then I share it with people who can advise what else to add/take out/reword.

The last step is to have Plan A, Plan B, and Plan C, because it's hard to write a birth plan while being prepped for a c-section. Not that I've had one, but that was Plan C. Plan A: optimal natural birth experience, used up until medical intervention is required. Plan B: for when medical intervention is required, because that doesn't mean I'm giving up all control. Plan C: necessary c-section. I know most people find it overboard, but it worked for me. I had Plan A birth plan for the birthing facility and Plan B and C birth plans combined to switch to if I had to transfer to a hospital, which I did. 

Some tips: organize your birth plan by stage of labor: first, second, third, after. If going to a hospital, bring several copies with cookies attached. If there's a shift change while you're in the hospital, make sure you have a copy and a bribe for the new nurses. 

LaideBug
by Bronze Member on Mar. 22, 2013 at 1:27 PM
My best advice is to keep it as short and to the point as possible. I listed things I did not want followed by things I did want that weren't typical hospital procedures. My OB and I went over it, as well as putting one in my chart for the staff when I went into labor.
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