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is it necessary to...

Posted by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 6:48 PM
  • 28 Replies
Get lead and iron test done on my 20 month old. I told her not concerned about her lead but she says that since she is still breastfed and no milk iron is a concern. Im not concerned. Thoughts?
by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 6:48 PM
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Replies (1-10):
VintageWife
by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 6:59 PM

Bump!

jellyphish
by Platinum Member on Apr. 23, 2013 at 7:28 PM
I get the iron tested. It sucks taking blood, but at least nothing is going in. And actually, we discovered blood abnormalities with my first, so I'm really glad I did it.
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lifeforchrist
by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 7:31 PM

Iron is not a concern. BM has plenty and if she's got a good diet it is even less likely. If there aren't any symptoms of anemia i can't see why you'd need to do it. Cows milk transfers very little of anything after all the junk they do to it. It just depends on what you want to do.

jellyphish
by Platinum Member on Apr. 23, 2013 at 7:35 PM
2 moms liked this
Everything I've read, including kellymom.com, says that bm does not have enough iron after about ten months of age. And there can be problems that go undetected. For example my daughter was not anemic, and everything seemed normal, and was ebf, but at 12 months a blood test showed high platelets as a result of iron deficiency. (high platelets cause blood clots)
Plus, there's not really a reason not to test, other than it sucks. At least not that I know of.


Quoting lifeforchrist:

Iron is not a concern. BM has plenty and if she's got a good diet it is even less likely. If there aren't any symptoms of anemia i can't see why you'd need to do it. Cows milk transfers very little of anything after all the junk they do to it. It just depends on what you want to do.

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lifeforchrist
by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 8:10 PM
2 moms liked this

Like I said if there is a good diet included with breastfeeding you are probably fine. I agree there is no reason not to test, but I wouldn't say it's necessary. Just depends on what the mom wants to do. But there is a reason bm has lower iron. The Noursihed Baby book reads:


In her book Real Food for Mother and Baby Nina Planck says:
“Your milk, and the milk of all mammals, lacks iron. In addition to being iron-poor, milk also
contains lactoferrin, which ties up any random iron floating about. At first glance, this seems like
an error, given that all living things need iron. With such a firm hand limiting the availability of
iron to the nursling we must suspect a deliberate strategy on nature’s part. Sure enough, there is logic to the missing iron. E. coli, the most common source of infant diarrhea in all species, depends on iron, as do other pathogens. As mentioned in the discussion of prenatal iron supplements, sequestering iron – keeping it out of the way of hungry microbes – is the body’s
response to infection A low-iron diet protects newborns from iron-loving microbes. As iron expert Sharon Moalem described it to me, lactoferrin is like an armored truck: it transports iron safely to its destination,
protecting it from marauding bacteria. Breast milk, in other words, is iron-poor by design. What
iron it contains is easily absorbed by your baby.” [emphasis mine]
What about as baby gets to the 4-6 month range? Well, studies show that breast milk changes
composition over time to meet the varied nutritional demands of infants/babies/toddlers. For
example, milk from women who have been nursing longer than one year has a substantially higher
fat content.¹ Around 4-6 months iron in breast milk remains low. So that means babies must not
need it at that particular stage in development, right?

Not so fast.
According to Dr. Nancy Krebs, their iron and zinc needs do increase at this stage. But I wonder,
does the fact that breast milk continues to be iron-poor tell us something about how things are
supposed to go here? I think so.
Babies are ready for more “tummy time” around 4 months and start crawling around 6-8 months.
This means that the time they need more iron just happens to coincide with when they will be
coming into contact with the ground more. Before the last few hundred years that would have
meant coming into contact with dirt, which contains ... iron and zinc!! (Or at least it should ...
modern farming practices, ugh!) So babies poke around in it and then suck on their fingers ...
voila! Iron goals attained.
I believe that breast milk composition reflects an innate understanding of how this process is
supposed to unfold. Kinda takes the “I Make Milk – What’s Your Superpower?” saying to a whole
new level, huh?

Quoting jellyphish:

Everything I've read, including kellymom.com, says that bm does not have enough iron after about ten months of age. And there can be problems that go undetected. For example my daughter was not anemic, and everything seemed normal, and was ebf, but at 12 months a blood test showed high platelets as a result of iron deficiency. (high platelets cause blood clots)
Plus, there's not really a reason not to test, other than it sucks. At least not that I know of.


Quoting lifeforchrist:

Iron is not a concern. BM has plenty and if she's got a good diet it is even less likely. If there aren't any symptoms of anemia i can't see why you'd need to do it. Cows milk transfers very little of anything after all the junk they do to it. It just depends on what you want to do.


Sarah725
by Group Mod - Sarah on Apr. 23, 2013 at 8:39 PM

 I never got those test's done on any of my kids.

jellyphish
by Platinum Member on Apr. 23, 2013 at 9:12 PM
That was an interesting read, thanks for sharing. Looks like we agree. :)

Quoting lifeforchrist:

Like I said if there is a good diet included with breastfeeding you are probably fine. I agree there is no reason not to test, but I wouldn't say it's necessary. Just depends on what the mom wants to do. But there is a reason bm has lower iron. The Noursihed Baby book reads:


In her book Real Food for Mother and Baby Nina Planck says:
“Your milk, and the milk of all mammals, lacks iron. In addition to being iron-poor, milk also
contains lactoferrin, which ties up any random iron floating about. At first glance, this seems like
an error, given that all living things need iron. With such a firm hand limiting the availability of
iron to the nursling we must suspect a deliberate strategy on nature’s part. Sure enough, there is logic to the missing iron. E. coli, the most common source of infant diarrhea in all species, depends on iron, as do other pathogens. As mentioned in the discussion of prenatal iron supplements, sequestering iron – keeping it out of the way of hungry microbes – is the body’s
response to infection A low-iron diet protects newborns from iron-loving microbes. As iron expert Sharon Moalem described it to me, lactoferrin is like an armored truck: it transports iron safely to its destination,
protecting it from marauding bacteria. Breast milk, in other words, is iron-poor by design. What
iron it contains is easily absorbed by your baby.” [emphasis mine]
What about as baby gets to the 4-6 month range? Well, studies show that breast milk changes
composition over time to meet the varied nutritional demands of infants/babies/toddlers. For
example, milk from women who have been nursing longer than one year has a substantially higher
fat content.¹ Around 4-6 months iron in breast milk remains low. So that means babies must not
need it at that particular stage in development, right?

Not so fast.
According to Dr. Nancy Krebs, their iron and zinc needs do increase at this stage. But I wonder,
does the fact that breast milk continues to be iron-poor tell us something about how things are
supposed to go here? I think so.
Babies are ready for more “tummy time” around 4 months and start crawling around 6-8 months.
This means that the time they need more iron just happens to coincide with when they will be
coming into contact with the ground more. Before the last few hundred years that would have
meant coming into contact with dirt, which contains ... iron and zinc!! (Or at least it should ...
modern farming practices, ugh!) So babies poke around in it and then suck on their fingers ...
voila! Iron goals attained.
I believe that breast milk composition reflects an innate understanding of how this process is
supposed to unfold. Kinda takes the “I Make Milk – What’s Your Superpower?” saying to a whole
new level, huh?

Quoting jellyphish:

Everything I've read, including kellymom.com, says that bm does not have enough iron after about ten months of age. And there can be problems that go undetected. For example my daughter was not anemic, and everything seemed normal, and was ebf, but at 12 months a blood test showed high platelets as a result of iron deficiency. (high platelets cause blood clots)
Plus, there's not really a reason not to test, other than it sucks. At least not that I know of.




Quoting lifeforchrist:

Iron is not a concern. BM has plenty and if she's got a good diet it is even less likely. If there aren't any symptoms of anemia i can't see why you'd need to do it. Cows milk transfers very little of anything after all the junk they do to it. It just depends on what you want to do.


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catholicmamamia
by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 9:16 PM

Mine have had their iron checked, never had an issue with it. 


                
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hapababies
by Silver Member on Apr. 23, 2013 at 9:20 PM
I have had it done. I'm not great about checking recalls on toys and so many toys we have are mainstream, so I was glad to have lead checked.
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sp1357
by on Apr. 23, 2013 at 9:30 PM
1 mom liked this
None of my kids drink cow's milk despite being told they are more likely to have low iron. I did agree however to have them checked. Results showed their iron levels were perfect so they no longer get tested anymore.
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