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Feeling insecure in our decision to send our kids to public school

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My husband has always wanted to home school, I have always been a fence sitter.  I am the stay at home parent, though, and I in no way feel qualified to teach my children everything they need to know.  Educators go to school for years learning how to help children retain knowledge and I have none of that expeience.  And my daughter is starting school in just a few months...

I just feel so strange and torn about it.  She is VERY excited at the prospect of being around other kids all day and getting to play on the playground and be with a teacher.  She really wants to do it.  I'm just so nervous.  It will be so strange not to have her here for several hours a day and to ahve her come home and know things I didn't teach her or witness her learning.  The school she will be attending does really well on standardized testing, I don't doubt that she will be getting a good education, but I worry about her being pounded into a mold I don't quite agree with.  I worry about her getting hurt (Newtown JUST happened in my mind).  I worry that she won't be getting enough opportunities to express herself and grow in the arts, if that's what interests her.

I worry that I am basing my decision to send her to public school on what is easiest, not what is best.  I'd send her to private school, which I feel is a decent compromise, if I could afford it, but I can't.  I'd teach her at home, but I really honestly don't think I'm up to the task, not to mention that I want to go back to work eventually.

Public school really seems like what will work best for our family, but I know that the education system needs serious overhaul and I know that I don't want her to be taught what to think intead of how to think. 

It's very overwhelming.

I don't know what anyone could say that would make it better, but I thought if anyone would be able to help, it would be you guys.  Sorry for the ramble :/

by on May. 6, 2013 at 12:20 PM
Replies (61-67):
Precious333
by Gold Member on May. 11, 2013 at 9:58 AM
Yes! My first grader and i spend about 1-3 hours (depending on special actvities etc), but preschooler and even toddler join in for however much they choose. We do a lot of freee play time, they help me around the house and we do park days and field trips as well. He also takes swimming, pe, and karate at the moment.


Quoting AtiFreeFalls:

 Thanks for the link and the tip to check out homeschooling groups here on CM :)  Also, I know that to learn the same thing at home school it takes much less time.  I know most home schooling families only spend a few hours a day tops doing school work and the rest is dedicated to whatever else they are interested in, which is one huge pro for home school.  I don't think kids are designed to sit in a classroom all day.


Quoting Precious333:

I have three kids, a fourth on the way. We homeschool and are not home all day. Its is a common misconception that homeschooling means staying home all day doing school work. We do many things during the week with friends, most of it is educationally motivated. My kids thrive and are challenged.



Quoting AtiFreeFalls:


 There will be much re-evaluating.  If she is not happy, is not learning enough, is bullied or if I don't like how she is being taught, I will yank her right out.



Quoting awesomemommy2:



I am a teacher and could not homeschool my children.  If they were all school aged it would be one thing but its not fair to my bright 7 year old to be home all day with a 3 and 4 year old.   He would learn less (LOL).   I dreaded sending my intelligent, sensitive son to public.  That said we looked into private but expensive and not totally thrilled with some of their policies.   Kids sit in neat rows, hands folded, kind of learning but I am very happy with our public here.   He has an excellent teacher.   Gets pulled out to do Excel math.   They learn in centers which I like.   He is thriving.   I say give it a chance and if its not working out reevaluate.   



 



 


AtiFreeFalls
by Bronze Member on May. 11, 2013 at 10:04 AM

 I've thought a lot about it, and I like the flexibility it offers.  I don't think I could go total unschool, though.  I have doubts about how proficient kids who don't show interest in, say, algebra, can be with that method.  Eventually, in order to get a well-rounded education, kids have to BE taught something they don't necessarily like I think, and that requires some structure.  Unschool seems even more like I will put it off and make excuses :-/

Quoting HeatherD1027:

I haven't read through all the comments so this may have been addressed, but have you looked into unschooling?

 

3kidz123
by Bronze Member on May. 11, 2013 at 10:14 AM

Not sure how to cheer you up because personally I prefer home schooling. There's just too many bad things in public school even in the younger grades these days.

But plenty of kids go to public school, it is pretty commen if that helps :)

Mrs.Salz
by on May. 11, 2013 at 10:22 AM
1 mom liked this

Totally understand, just wanted to mention it as an option :)

Quoting AtiFreeFalls:

 I am definitely not interested in online schooling.  She's only 5.  I don't want her sitting in front of the computer for too long lol.  I allow her some screen time, don't get me wrong, but the time it takes to do school work will increase year by year until she's spending hours a day on the computer. 

I will check into corrospondance courses, though :)

Quoting Mrs.Salz:

Homeschool curriculums are designed for parents who don't have education degrees. I had friends whose parents had teaching degrees that they said were not helpful at all in teaching their kids. Correspondence and online schools is another option where you are essentially facilitating, rather than directly teaching.


 


MomTiara19
by on May. 11, 2013 at 10:33 AM

I really like the town my family lives in.So the public school system was fine for us.The parents are very involved,sports were great for my son,and my daughter is a high honor student.Our public high-school is putting about 83 million dollars into the latest computers,equipment,and school design.

Another great option is Magnet schools.It is free and a lottery process with great education and arts programs..

larissalarie
by Gold Member on May. 11, 2013 at 10:52 AM
1 mom liked this
You actually don't have to sit in front of the computer all day to do online school, that's a common misperception. They still send you real physical textbooks and workbooks to use. You only have to be online for the assessments (and a lotta those kids actually complete with pen & paper and then you the parents enter the results online) and then the parent has to spend a short bit of time each day doing administrative things like logging attendance hours, marking completed lessons, getting the next days lesson plans, etc.

Not trying to change your mind at all, just clearing up a common myth about online school.:)


Quoting AtiFreeFalls:

 I am definitely not interested in online schooling.  She's only 5.  I don't want her sitting in front of the computer for too long lol.  I allow her some screen time, don't get me wrong, but the time it takes to do school work will increase year by year until she's spending hours a day on the computer. 

I will check into corrospondance courses, though :)


Quoting Mrs.Salz:


Homeschool curriculums are designed for parents who don't have education degrees. I had friends whose parents had teaching degrees that they said were not helpful at all in teaching their kids. Correspondence and online schools is another option where you are essentially facilitating, rather than directly teaching.




 

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AtiFreeFalls
by Bronze Member on May. 11, 2013 at 11:12 AM

 I didn't know that, thank you for clearing it up.  I will keep that in mind as well!

Quoting larissalarie:

You actually don't have to sit in front of the computer all day to do online school, that's a common misperception. They still send you real physical textbooks and workbooks to use. You only have to be online for the assessments (and a lotta those kids actually complete with pen & paper and then you the parents enter the results online) and then the parent has to spend a short bit of time each day doing administrative things like logging attendance hours, marking completed lessons, getting the next days lesson plans, etc.

Not trying to change your mind at all, just clearing up a common myth about online school.:)


Quoting AtiFreeFalls:

 I am definitely not interested in online schooling.  She's only 5.  I don't want her sitting in front of the computer for too long lol.  I allow her some screen time, don't get me wrong, but the time it takes to do school work will increase year by year until she's spending hours a day on the computer. 

I will check into corrospondance courses, though :)


Quoting Mrs.Salz:


Homeschool curriculums are designed for parents who don't have education degrees. I had friends whose parents had teaching degrees that they said were not helpful at all in teaching their kids. Correspondence and online schools is another option where you are essentially facilitating, rather than directly teaching.




 

 

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