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Natural Birth & Parenting Natural Birth & Parenting

The Eczema Enigma

Posted by on May. 11, 2013 at 5:10 PM
  • 14 Replies

I'm a natural mom.  We usually eat right, we rarely get sick, and we generally have little to no health issues.  Imagine my dismay when we found out my 8-month old son had eczema, a problem in which I had no prior natural health insight.

When the doctor said Eros would need hydro-cortisone cream and Zyrtec, I literally felt sick inside.  To me, this meant I'd be destroying some parts of his body to help others.  This could have meant a life-long dependency on prescription drugs...drugs that are created exactly for that purpose, for if they did cure people's problems, the pharmaceutical industry wouldn't be so rich and powerful.

Eros' eczema made itself known when we introduced food into his diet.  That told me there was an intestinal issue.  What solidified this notion was when I read facts and testimonials that pointed to vaccines and antibiotics.  I was subjected to 3 rounds of antibiotics when I was in labor because I had tested positive for Strep B, which everyone has anyway.  The antibiotics tore up my stomach and immune system so badly that I wound up with a staph infection (which I'd never had) in my breast that had to be removed surgically...there went my plan to breast-feed for 2 years!  Now I've come to find that these antibiotics may have torn up my son's stomach, causing what is referred to as a hyper-permeable stomach lining.

This thinned-out stomach lining compromises digestion, and that which is not digested can literally leak out into the blood stream and lymphatics.  Toxic matter is released all over the body and is eliminated through the skin.  If this is true, eczema is formed when toxic matter climbs through the skin from the inside, causing pain, irritation, and itchingAnd it may not be a genetic issue at all!

I decided to start over.  Eros' stomach was not ready for food.  We went back to just milk and fortified it with natural sources of calcium, magnesium, and Vitamin D, among other things.  These aid in digestion, and skin health.  We also regularly applied coconut oil topically - it eases the itching, moisturizes, and protects the skin.  His eczema has cleared up completely! Our next step is to slowly re-introduce food, starting in a few days  We are starting with freshly-juiced organic carrots...they are filled with digestive enzymes and anti-oxidants, and the pulp will prepare his stomach for solids.

I will be using foods on the GAPS Diet list, and I am a believer in muscle-testing, so I'm certain to have positive results with this plan.

I'll update when I have new info!

by on May. 11, 2013 at 5:10 PM
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Replies (1-10):
ceckyl
by Bronze Member on May. 11, 2013 at 5:17 PM
1 mom liked this
Sorry about your son. Vaccines and antibiotics can certainly have those effects.
LaideBug
by Bronze Member on May. 11, 2013 at 5:41 PM
1 mom liked this
So sorry about your son, it's awesome he has a Mama in his corner willing to look further for answers. :) It seems so many doctors treat symptoms without looking at WHY things happen.
GoodyBrook
by on May. 12, 2013 at 1:07 AM

My 25 month old was just diagnosed with eczema and seasonal allergies last week.  I have an appointment with an Allergist next week to get more information.

My sister swears by muscle-testing.  That might be out next step after the Allergist....

GeauxMommy
by on May. 12, 2013 at 12:19 PM

I haven't looked into allergy testing because we're going to avoid foods that people are allergic to...for the most part, they are the same foods.  Also, if we build his stomach, he can overcome those allergies if he has any. 

Muscle testing is great.  I test its accuracy by asking all sorts of questions.  FE, I've asked how long it would take for ailments to heal, and I've even asked what time my cousin's band practice would be over.  When I had surgery to remove a breast absess, the incision was left open to heal from the inside out.  It was 5 cm deep.  I muscle tested its depth and when it would be healed, and it was accurate to the cm and day.  I sometimes don't agree with the answers, but they've been right every time! 

GoodyBrook
by on May. 12, 2013 at 1:41 PM

 


Quoting GeauxMommy:

I haven't looked into allergy testing because we're going to avoid foods that people are allergic to...for the most part, they are the same foods.  Also, if we build his stomach, he can overcome those allergies if he has any. 

Muscle testing is great.  I test its accuracy by asking all sorts of questions.  FE, I've asked how long it would take for ailments to heal, and I've even asked what time my cousin's band practice would be over.  When I had surgery to remove a breast absess, the incision was left open to heal from the inside out.  It was 5 cm deep.  I muscle tested its depth and when it would be healed, and it was accurate to the cm and day.  I sometimes don't agree with the answers, but they've been right every time! 


 I've not heard of doing it yourself!  How interesting!  I've watched it done--with accurate results, but I always had the impression that you had to be "trained" to do it properly...   Are you trained?  Can you point me toward to resources to learn about doing it myself?

GeauxMommy
by on May. 13, 2013 at 5:11 PM
1 mom liked this

There are different ways to do it, so you'd have to try the way that works best for you.  You can muscle test for someone else very easily. 

Make a circle with you thumb and middle finger on each hand, then interlock them, like a chain-link.  Then determine if a yes or no is answered when your "link" stays or breaks when you pull your hands away.  For me, yes is the answer when the link stays.  I always ask if I'm testable first.  I ask obvious-answer questions to see how accurate the answers are. 

It's good to test out your accuracy on benign issues in which you have no emotional investment.  You eventually learn to trust your answerability and will use it for all kinds of things! 

GoodyBrook
by on May. 13, 2013 at 5:21 PM

Eczema related, but off-topic to your original post:  I just found out today that children who have eczema and get the smallpox vaccination can potentially die if they develop eczema vaccinatum.  Granted it came fro Wikipedia, but it does deserve a bit of thought and possible investigation by mamas who have kids with eczema:

Those with eczema should not get the smallpox vaccination due to risk of developing eczema vaccinatum, a potentially severe and sometimes fatal complication.[14]

jconney80
by Group Mod on May. 13, 2013 at 11:30 PM
The GAPS diet started from the beginning can help cure food allergies. Definitely what I would do and what we will be doing shortly
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GoodyBrook
by on May. 14, 2013 at 1:25 AM

 


Quoting jconney80:

The GAPS diet started from the beginning can help cure food allergies. Definitely what I would do and what we will be doing shortly


 Can you point me to a reliable link?

catholicmamamia
by on May. 14, 2013 at 1:32 AM

Quoting ceckyl: Sorry about your son. Vaccines and antibiotics can certainly have those effects.

 


                
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