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Waldorf schools?

Posted by on Jul. 14, 2013 at 11:25 PM
  • 24 Replies

I was looking into sending my son to one. He didn't qualify for an IEP or school services through the school district & is on the autism spectrum. He is very hands on & learns through doing things. I originally thought it would be too expensive for us to send him to one but we found it we might be able to do it 2x a week. My friend told me that they are very supportive of natural or attachment parenting. If you have had experiences with Waldorf style schools did you find this to be true? 

by on Jul. 14, 2013 at 11:25 PM
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Replies (1-10):
jellyphish
by Platinum Member on Jul. 14, 2013 at 11:36 PM
I looked into it briefly, and personally feel its not fitting for preparing someone to succeed in modern society. I'm in love with Montessori though.
A two day a week program may be good though, especially for someone on the spectrum.
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VintageWife
by on Jul. 15, 2013 at 12:16 AM

^^^I'm not a fan of Montessori. My bff sent her son to one for preschool and pre-k and as she says, they mostly just tought him to fold a napkin and color a page. She has had to cut an extra day off from working a week to work with him on learning to spell and write his name, learn the info he needs to know about himself and his family, and several other things they should teach. Maybe jellyphish knows of some good ones though :)

I don't know much about Waldorf schools. Why doesn't the district give him IEP. I didn't know they could decline it!

GoodyBrook
by on Jul. 15, 2013 at 12:27 AM

If there is a medical reason behind your request for an IEP, I believe the school district HAS to oblige you.

My nephew had an IEP for his poor handwriting!  He had a slight tremor from a neurological disorder that gave him terrible handwriting, but the IEP stated that his teachers couldn't mark him down for his poor penmanship.  He was also allowed a bit longer for any handwritten essay test.

Rather than searching for a better school, it would be ideal if the school you're currently in would simply accomodate your son's needs and get an IEP in place.

jellyphish
by Platinum Member on Jul. 15, 2013 at 12:37 AM
What?! That does NOT sound like a good school! Biggie was in a kindergartener/preK class and the students that had been there longer knew so much more. Three year olds were already reading! And they learned how to spell everyone's name, and absolutely their own!
Her second week there she was singing songs about the solar system, she already knew things about Neptune that I didn't know!

Man, I'd be upset too!

Hopefully you won't let one bad experience turn you off from all Montessori. I learned that a lot of mont schools don't even have mont certified teachers. That kinda sucks too.


Quoting VintageWife:

^^^I'm not a fan of Montessori. My bff sent her son to one for preschool and pre-k and as she says, they mostly just tought him to fold a napkin and color a page. She has had to cut an extra day off from working a week to work with him on learning to spell and write his name, learn the info he needs to know about himself and his family, and several other things they should teach. Maybe jellyphish knows of some good ones though :)


I don't know much about Waldorf schools. Why doesn't the district give him IEP. I didn't know they could decline it!

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jconney80
by Group Mod on Jul. 15, 2013 at 1:45 AM
There are some loopholes in this kind of thing. Since my son is only 3 they won't help him unless his IQ is low, he has no speech, and he has to score very low their testing. Well, he's none of those things. Even with a medical diagnosis of autism they don't have to help him. They have to diagnose him with autism in the school setting and see actual problems that would affect his learning. See since he's 3 they don't want to pay money for him if they don't have to. Once they get older they will be more willing (even then it can be a nightmare) to help since they are already allotted money to pay for his public education. It's all about money.

We can try again but I am not sure how much I trust putting him into a public setting with no help in place. Many people don't believe he's autistic and don't understand so if he starts acting up they treat him like he's being s brat and get frustrated. I don't want to put him through that garbage. They basically told us we have to put him in school to get data. In other words I'm supposed to put him in school to let him suffer and get data from a teacher who could be clueless about what autism is just to prove he's really autistic. Its ridiculous.
Quoting GoodyBrook:

If there is a medical reason behind your request for an IEP, I believe the school district HAS to oblige you.


My nephew had an IEP for his poor handwriting!  He had a slight tremor from a neurological disorder that gave him terrible handwriting, but the IEP stated that his teachers couldn't mark him down for his poor penmanship.  He was also allowed a bit longer for any handwritten essay test.


Rather than searching for a better school, it would be ideal if the school you're currently in would simply accomodate your son's needs and get an IEP in place.

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jconney80
by Group Mod on Jul. 15, 2013 at 1:49 AM
That's weird! I'm not worried about the academic aspect of it really. He knows all of his letters, numbers, shapes, colors, and can read some sight words. I'm interested more in the social aspect and him getting actual experience with learning things hands on because he learns better visually. I have heard great things about Montessori for kids who learn differently. I'd just love a school who respects our parenting since public school teachers seem to treat you like a freak if you take an actual interest in your kids. I teach him a lot academically at home and could possibly end up homeschooling him in the future but he's gotten interested in being social with other kids so I want to help him see how other kids are.

Quoting VintageWife:

^^^I'm not a fan of Montessori. My bff sent her son to one for preschool and pre-k and as she says, they mostly just tought him to fold a napkin and color a page. She has had to cut an extra day off from working a week to work with him on learning to spell and write his name, learn the info he needs to know about himself and his family, and several other things they should teach. Maybe jellyphish knows of some good ones though :)


I don't know much about Waldorf schools. Why doesn't the district give him IEP. I didn't know they could decline it!

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jconney80
by Group Mod on Jul. 15, 2013 at 1:53 AM
I'll do some more research and look into Montessori too. I do agree with you about the modern society aspect. We teach him about technology at home though. And obviously I wouldn't want him in Waldorf forever. I just felt like maybe it's an easier transition for him since it's sensory friendly too. It would meet a lot of his sensory needs. I think they spend a lot of time outside even in the winter, which I love. IDK it's just an idea. I'm trying to get a feel for it. It's far too expensive to keep him in through grade school!

Quoting jellyphish:

I looked into it briefly, and personally feel its not fitting for preparing someone to succeed in modern society. I'm in love with Montessori though.

A two day a week program may be good though, especially for someone on the spectrum.
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jconney80
by Group Mod on Jul. 15, 2013 at 1:54 AM
That's crappy that they're not certified. I'll keep that in mind. That's awesome that she was learning so much. I do think kids learn a lot when it doesn't seem like learning. They're naturally curious anyways!

Quoting jellyphish:

What?! That does NOT sound like a good school! Biggie was in a kindergartener/preK class and the students that had been there longer knew so much more. Three year olds were already reading! And they learned how to spell everyone's name, and absolutely their own!

Her second week there she was singing songs about the solar system, she already knew things about Neptune that I didn't know!



Man, I'd be upset too!



Hopefully you won't let one bad experience turn you off from all Montessori. I learned that a lot of mont schools don't even have mont certified teachers. That kinda sucks too.




Quoting VintageWife:

^^^I'm not a fan of Montessori. My bff sent her son to one for preschool and pre-k and as she says, they mostly just tought him to fold a napkin and color a page. She has had to cut an extra day off from working a week to work with him on learning to spell and write his name, learn the info he needs to know about himself and his family, and several other things they should teach. Maybe jellyphish knows of some good ones though :)



I don't know much about Waldorf schools. Why doesn't the district give him IEP. I didn't know they could decline it!

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
jellyphish
by Platinum Member on Jul. 15, 2013 at 1:59 AM
The only reason I can afford Montessori is because its a charter school, so it's free kinder and up. Maybe check around to see if there's something like that in your area, Waldorf or Montessori, it seems, are both better for tactile and sensory learning.

Quoting jconney80:

I'll do some more research and look into Montessori too. I do agree with you about the modern society aspect. We teach him about technology at home though. And obviously I wouldn't want him in Waldorf forever. I just felt like maybe it's an easier transition for him since it's sensory friendly too. It would meet a lot of his sensory needs. I think they spend a lot of time outside even in the winter, which I love. IDK it's just an idea. I'm trying to get a feel for it. It's far too expensive to keep him in through grade school!



Quoting jellyphish:

I looked into it briefly, and personally feel its not fitting for preparing someone to succeed in modern society. I'm in love with Montessori though.


A two day a week program may be good though, especially for someone on the spectrum.
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jconney80
by Group Mod on Jul. 15, 2013 at 2:01 AM
That's really cool! I'll have to look. I know some are in certain districts and are free but I don't think we have any in our district.

Quoting jellyphish:

The only reason I can afford Montessori is because its a charter school, so it's free kinder and up. Maybe check around to see if there's something like that in your area, Waldorf or Montessori, it seems, are both better for tactile and sensory learning.



Quoting jconney80:

I'll do some more research and look into Montessori too. I do agree with you about the modern society aspect. We teach him about technology at home though. And obviously I wouldn't want him in Waldorf forever. I just felt like maybe it's an easier transition for him since it's sensory friendly too. It would meet a lot of his sensory needs. I think they spend a lot of time outside even in the winter, which I love. IDK it's just an idea. I'm trying to get a feel for it. It's far too expensive to keep him in through grade school!





Quoting jellyphish:

I looked into it briefly, and personally feel its not fitting for preparing someone to succeed in modern society. I'm in love with Montessori though.



A two day a week program may be good though, especially for someone on the spectrum.
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