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Help Mommies! What's the best way that you get your Toddlers (1 to 3 Year olds) to listen to you?

Posted by on Jul. 22, 2013 at 3:07 PM
  • 14 Replies

Hello Mothers:

I have a 2 year old that is very active, busy and not good at following instruction from even me, his mommy.  So, I wanted to put a post out there to see what some of you moms have done to get your toddlers to listen to your instruction, in addition to any redirecting like For example, just today my son wanted to grab another baby's toy duck during story time at the library, and the mother showed signs that she did not want him to play with it, and I did not want him to play with it, etc. and in spite of me telling him not to get the toy and pulling him away, plus pulling out his toy phone, he made at least 2 more attempts to go for the toy duck.  Now, I admit the toy phone probably did not work since I did not allow the toy to be turned on because it would have been disruptive, next time I will bring the non disruptive/non-noisy toys or books (in some cases they have worked temporarily in the past).  Anyway, any moms out there have problems with your child not following your instruction, or listening to you when you try to give them instruction as best you can with their level of understanding?

Thanks.

Sincerely,

Blessings2cum

by on Jul. 22, 2013 at 3:07 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Brieshon
by on Jul. 22, 2013 at 5:30 PM
Part of a toddler's normal development is to explore and touch and experiment with the world around them, even if that means going against what mommy or daddy says. As frustrating as that is for parents, it's just what they do. Also, a toddler's memory, attention span, and concept of cause-and-effect are still developing; they're just learning that touching something sharp causes pain, so it will take a lot of repetition, explaining, etc.

My best success has been prevention (not letting them see toys they shouldn't play with), repetition (soooo annoying, but they need it), and letting them have as much freedom to explore as is safe and socially acceptable. :)

Good luck! I hear kids start listening once they have kids of their own and realize their parents were right all along. ;)
blessings2cum
by on Jul. 22, 2013 at 5:56 PM

Hello Brieshon:

Thank you for your responding and advice.  Yes, I do know and tell my spouse and some others how this is a whole new world for my son and other little ones, so for him to be curious and explore is a natural thing.  I definitely understand that because it just makes sense they don't know what this is or that is and want to explore with their hands, mouth, etc. 


LOL -

I hear kids start listening once they have kids of their own and realize their parents were right all along. ;)


Thanks and Sincerely,

Blessings2cum



conejoazul
by Bronze Member on Jul. 22, 2013 at 7:27 PM

Brieshon : Love what you said (highlighted in red  vvv ).

Our toddler - just turned three - still tunes us out for the most part unless he is in the mood to be compliant. We also do best when we are ahead of his moves and are able to practice "prevention", though sometimes it gets away from us and we learn we didn't intervene soon enough.

I guess learning to manage our own patience levels is what we are being more successful at, so far.

Quoting Brieshon:

Part of a toddler's normal development is to explore and touch and experiment with the world around them, even if that means going against what mommy or daddy says. As frustrating as that is for parents, it's just what they do. Also, a toddler's memory, attention span, and concept of cause-and-effect are still developing; they're just learning that touching something sharp causes pain, so it will take a lot of repetition, explaining, etc.

My best success has been prevention (not letting them see toys they shouldn't play with), repetition (soooo annoying, but they need it), and letting them have as much freedom to explore as is safe and socially acceptable. :)

Good luck! I hear kids start listening once they have kids of their own and realize their parents were right all along. ;)


blessings2cum
by on Jul. 22, 2013 at 9:28 PM

Hello Conejoazul:

Thanks for your response.  Yes, patience is a good parent's tool also when dealing with little ones especially.

Sincerely,

Blessings2cum

bloomsr
by Bronze Member on Jul. 22, 2013 at 10:53 PM
Explain what you expect/why you expect it, describe what the punishment will be if the unwanted behavior continues, follow through with the consequence.

With young toddlers "we take turns with toys, you need to wait until he's done with the duck to play with it, if you can't wait your turn you won't get to play w the duck at all, that's too bad! You didn't wait your turn. You won't get to play w the duck today (followed by quick redirection)" would be am example of this sequence.

As your toddler grows you can expect more in terms of behavior and the consequences should reflect their ability to comprehend and better control their actions- you will only have to carry a screaming and kicking kid out of a store/play area a few times before they realize you mean business!
blessings2cum
by on Jul. 23, 2013 at 8:31 AM

Good Morning Bloomsr:

Thank you too for your response and assistance.  Great example, "With young toddlers "we take turns with toys, you need to wait until he's done with the duck to play with it, if you can't wait your turn you won't get to play w the duck at all, that's too bad! You didn't wait your turn. You won't get to play w the duck today (followed by quick redirection)" would be am example of this sequence."  even though my son was not allowed to play with that child's toy, again that mother did not want him to play with it, and as a reslut of her response I did not want him to do so, but I get you are just using a helpful example.  Thank you.

Sincerely,

Blessings2cum

JoJoBean8
by Group Mod on Jul. 23, 2013 at 8:44 AM

I just remove him from the situation. We also use a lot of gates so he can't get near things he isn't allowed to touch.

blessings2cum
by on Jul. 23, 2013 at 8:50 AM

Good Morning JoJOBean8:

Thank you for responding and your advice.  In that situation eventually my little explorer opened up the door to go out of the room we were all in, and he explored other parts of the library (lol) so that was my way to exit.

Sincerely,

Blessings2cum

crystalplus1
by Member on Jul. 23, 2013 at 8:54 AM

Time outs, a slap on the hand. Ds likes to try this stuff to, but he knows when mommy is not playing.  He is also 2, and at this age they need more than redirection sometimes.

blessings2cum
by on Jul. 23, 2013 at 12:43 PM

Hello Crystalplus1:

Thank you for your response and advice.

Sincerely,

Blessings2cum

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