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Natural Birth & Parenting Natural Birth & Parenting

How to prevent overfeeding with bottles...for working BFing moms

Posted by on Oct. 14, 2013 at 7:02 PM
  • 10 Replies

http://sdbfc.com/blog/2013/10/9/top-10-ways-to-stop-caregivers-from-overfeeding-your-breastf.html

Top 10 Ways to Stop Caregivers from Overfeeding Your Breastfed Baby

  1. Keep bottles in small increments (2-4oz, depending on the weight and age of your baby) and tell the caregiver to wait in between bottles to assess the baby’s mood (to see if he/she is really hungry) – Haley
  2. Use the slowest flow nipple you can find and use the 1oz per hour rule (offer 1oz per hour that you are away from your baby) – Miranda
  3. Pre-make bottles in small increments.  For example, leave two 3oz bottles so caregivers don’t have to divide a 6oz bag into two separate bottles.  – Shelly
  4. Go over Kellymom’s article with your baby’s caregiver, How to bottlefeeding the breastfed baby, which talks about paced bottlefeeding – Tova and Megan
  5. After baby has taken the bottle, try other soothing techniques (i.e. rocking, singing, swaying, take on a walk) rather than offering more breastmilk in an extra bottle.
  6. Keep a few extra 1oz bags of breastmilk in the freezer or fridge.  That way, if your baby’s caregiver really needs to offer your baby a little bit more, it is a small amount and won’t go to waste.
  7. Talk to your baby’s caregiver about reusing breastmilk.  While there are no definitive studies that state the exact amount of time that breastmilk must be used within (once the bottle has been fed from), most lactation consultants believe that if a bottle of breastmilk isn’t completely finished, it is safe to place it back in the fridge and the remainder used within 4 hours.  (Kellymom.com article - Reusing Expressed Breastmilk)
  8. Use the milk calculator to figure out how much your baby will need per bottle.  Keep in mind, this is only accurate until your baby weighs 14lbs.  After that, your baby’s breastmilk need plateaus at about 28-35oz per day.  It won’t go up beyond that, so those 6-8oz bottles are really unnecessary.
  9. Have a heart to heart discussion with your baby’s caregiver.  Let him/her know how important it is to you that your baby isn’t overfed while away from you.  Show empathy and explain that you understand how challenging it is to read your baby’s cues and that things are easier for you because you can always soothe your baby with your breast, which is something the caregiver cannot do.  Explain how much milk your baby truly needs in a bottle and during the time you are gone.  Anything over that is too much for your baby and makes it difficult for you to keep up.  Come up with unique ways for him/her to bond with and soothe your baby, rather than just relying on giving more breastmilk in a bottle.
  10. This advice came from a nanny, which was written so well I didn’t want to paraphrase it.  ‘I nannies a breastfed baby for about a year and communication with the mom was very important. I also stuck to a schedule.  If it was getting close to time for another bottle and I expected her home soon, I would text or call her to see if she wanted me to wait if she was on her way.  Also, we would talk in the morning and she would let me know if she planned on coming home for lunch so I knew not to make a bottle.  When I noticed that her son’s appetite was increasing, I would let her know that he was acting more hungry increased his bottles 1oz at a time.  We also worked on adjusting his schedule so instead of 4oz every 2 hours, we found that 5oz every 3 hours kept him happy.  That way he only needed 2 bottles while she was gone (10oz) instead of 3-4 bottles (12-16oz).  A big help was her freezer milk in a variety of ounces.  I was able to defrost what I needed to give her son without wasting any.  As a breastfeeding mom myself, I did my best to respect the hard work she put into building a stash of milk for her son. – Catie.

 

What tips would YOU add to this list?  How have you worked with your caregiver to not overfeed your breastfed baby?

by on Oct. 14, 2013 at 7:02 PM
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Replies (1-10):
jconney80
by Group Mod on Oct. 14, 2013 at 8:25 PM

Thanks this is really great advice! I see so many moms having daycare tell them they need to feed as much as formula fed babies and it certainly is not true!

jconney80
by Group Mod on Oct. 14, 2013 at 8:32 PM

I would do like the last paragraph says and always be in constant communication with your caregiver about when you want to nurse (if you want them to hold off when you're getting off work etc).

tabi_cat1023
by Group Mod - Tabitha on Oct. 14, 2013 at 8:50 PM

I had to pull my son from daycare because they were determined even after a doctors feeding plan that I as starving my son..even reported us to DSS

jconney80
by Group Mod on Oct. 14, 2013 at 8:57 PM

WOW! That is horrible. I'm so sorry :(

Quoting tabi_cat1023:

I had to pull my son from daycare because they were determined even after a doctors feeding plan that I as starving my son..even reported us to DSS


Nicolle_09
by Silver Member on Oct. 14, 2013 at 9:45 PM

I was never a working mom but i was an exclusively pumping mom and I know all too well the irritation that can come from the person watching your child wanting to give them more. I finally just would thaw out 24 hours worth and divide them into the seperate bottles. More often then not there would be extra left over. But I had people on my ass about till we switched to formula when I loss my supply...

JoJoBean8
by Group Mod on Oct. 15, 2013 at 12:01 PM

Good tips. Bump for those who need it. 

tansyflower
by on Oct. 15, 2013 at 12:04 PM
1 mom liked this

this is good for formula feeding moms too!  every time i hear about someone feeding an 8 week old 9 ounces of formula it makes my tummy hurt :(

Sarah725
by Group Mod - Sarah on Oct. 15, 2013 at 3:53 PM

I'm so sorry, that's horrible!!

Quoting tabi_cat1023:

I had to pull my son from daycare because they were determined even after a doctors feeding plan that I as starving my son..even reported us to DSS


Sarah725
by Group Mod - Sarah on Oct. 15, 2013 at 3:53 PM

This is good advice, thanks.

tabi_cat1023
by Group Mod - Tabitha on Oct. 15, 2013 at 7:30 PM


Yeah no kidding

Quoting tansyflower:

this is good for formula feeding moms too!  every time i hear about someone feeding an 8 week old 9 ounces of formula it makes my tummy hurt :(



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