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Thinking about homeschooling?

Posted by on Jul. 23, 2012 at 2:28 PM
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It is early for me to be thinking about this but, it is such an important decision to make. My daughter is ten months old and is high needs I also beleive she might have the same learning disabilities as I do I have yet to be diagnosed with anything other than add but there is more.. So these are the two reasons why I realy want to home school her, I already do sign language and reading with her and have tons of toys that sing the abc's, count, do opposites, teach manners, hand eye coordination, colors shapes, animals, ect.. I am all about fun learning from day one.

I have questions ( please keep in mind I am 19 trying to start my own bussiness and my husband is trying to get into the army; he has some issues with a recent bone break and weight loss)

1. What age do I start?
2. Where can I go to find out more information ( like signing up and whatever)
3. What are any good programs I could look into?
4. What kind of exspensices do I need to look into? Books, program cost ect..
5. How would I solicalize my daughter if she isn't going to school( no one but me in my family has young kids, I do not do day care!)
6. Any tips?lol I don't know a anything about this..
by on Jul. 23, 2012 at 2:28 PM
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1mom_under_God
by on Jul. 23, 2012 at 2:59 PM

i think you can start schoolong at any age . im in alabama and they require you start your child at age six. im on my second ye of homeschooling and we make learning out of everything. cooking we count eggs and stuff. my big kids read to my little kids. but like worksheets i get free printables online or a workbook that lasts all year from books a million or amazon.com. its not exspensive. you can have playdates with moms in your area or just take your little baby to the park. my children always make friends at the park.:) 

hcusa
by on Jul. 23, 2012 at 3:33 PM
1 mom liked this

You're off to a good start, because you are already thinking ahead and beginning your research.  That's the most important first step.  Go to your public library and check out homeschooling books and read, read, read.

1. & 2.   Find out the homeschool laws for your state.  This link can help you: http://hslda.org/hs/default.asp  Simply click on your state and read the summary of "LAWS: How to legally homeschool in (your state).  This will tell you by what age you must legally start schooling and what you will need to do in terms of accountability, such as submitting a letter of intent to homeschool.  Of course, there's nothing saying you can't "unofficially" start schooling at a younger age, as you are doing, but you will want to keep in mind at what age you must start reporting to your state.

3.  You have plenty of time to research programs and curriculum for your daughter.  Right now, keep things simple and fun as you are doing.  When she's a bit older, you might want to look at Starfall - http://www.starfall.com/ (a free phonics/learn-to-read website), and Head of the Class - http://www.theheadoftheclass.com/, which has free curriculum for preschoolers and goes through 5th grade.  Meanwhile, you will want to become familiar with the many styles of homeschooling.  This includes things like unschooling, eclectic, and more.  Again, your best bet here is to hit your local library and pick up as many books on homeschooling that you can find.

4.  This is a hard question to answer.  You can homeschool for virtually pennies, if you have good internet access and can make regular library visits, or you can spend many hundreds or even thousands of dollars, or something in between those extremes.  You'll be able to answer this question yourself better after you've learned more about homeschooling and have narrowed down what you want to do, what curriculum you want to use, and so on.  (Just FYI:  On average my family spent about $450 a year toward homeschooling our two children and this included a $180 fee to our co-op, all of our curriculum and supplies, and "field trip" money.)

5.  Find some play groups in your area, or even start one yourself.  Your child is likely too young to join any homeschool support groups at this time, but you may be able to find some kind of MOPs group.  Also look for programs like toddler reading time at a local bookstore or your library.  When your daughter gets closer to kindergarten age, that will be the time to start looking for a homeschool group or co-op.  You can find out more information about that by Googling your state's name and "homeschool groups."  Something will come up.

6.  Did I mention going to your library and checking out homeschooling books?  LOL.  There are also some good resources online for new homeschoolers.  Try this link: http://www.thehomeschoolmom.com/newtohomeschooling/#.UA2lVrSe6So.  Also, if your husband does join the military or your daughter is diagnosed with special needs, the Homeschool Foundation may be able to help you.  http://www.homeschoolfoundation.org/index.php?id=22

Best tip?  Find a local mentor.  Find a mom in your area who has been homeschooling for awhile and can really get you connected with other homeschoolers (as well as help you navigate the waters of homeschooling legally.)  Having a mentor can make all the difference.  :)

MamaSwan001
by on Jul. 23, 2012 at 4:04 PM
Quoting hcusa:

You're off to a good start, because you are already thinking ahead and beginning your research.  That's the most important first step.  Go to your public library and check out homeschooling books and read, read, read.

1. & 2.   Find out the homeschool laws for your state.  This link can help you: http://hslda.org/hs/default.asp  Simply click on your state and read the summary of "LAWS: How to legally homeschool in (your state).  This will tell you by what age you must legally start schooling and what you will need to do in terms of accountability, such as submitting a letter of intent to homeschool.  Of course, there's nothing saying you can't "unofficially" start schooling at a younger age, as you are doing, but you will want to keep in mind at what age you must start reporting to your state.

3.  You have plenty of time to research programs and curriculum for your daughter.  Right now, keep things simple and fun as you are doing.  When she's a bit older, you might want to look at Starfall - http://www.starfall.com/ (a free phonics/learn-to-read website), and Head of the Class - http://www.theheadoftheclass.com/, which has free curriculum for preschoolers and goes through 5th grade.  Meanwhile, you will want to become familiar with the many styles of homeschooling.  This includes things like unschooling, eclectic, and more.  Again, your best bet here is to hit your local library and pick up as many books on homeschooling that you can find.

4.  This is a hard question to answer.  You can homeschool for virtually pennies, if you have good internet access and can make regular library visits, or you can spend many hundreds or even thousands of dollars, or something in between those extremes.  You'll be able to answer this question yourself better after you've learned more about homeschooling and have narrowed down what you want to do, what curriculum you want to use, and so on.  (Just FYI:  On average my family spent about $450 a year toward homeschooling our two children and this included a $180 fee to our co-op, all of our curriculum and supplies, and "field trip" money.)

5.  Find some play groups in your area, or even start one yourself.  Your child is likely too young to join any homeschool support groups at this time, but you may be able to find some kind of MOPs group.  Also look for programs like toddler reading time at a local bookstore or your library.  When your daughter gets closer to kindergarten age, that will be the time to start looking for a homeschool group or co-op.  You can find out more information about that by Googling your state's name and "homeschool groups."  Something will come up.

6.  Did I mention going to your library and checking out homeschooling books?  LOL.  There are also some good resources online for new homeschoolers.  Try this link: http://www.thehomeschoolmom.com/newtohomeschooling/#.UA2lVrSe6So.  Also, if your husband does join the military or your daughter is diagnosed with special needs, the Homeschool Foundation may be able to help you.  http://www.homeschoolfoundation.org/index.php?id=22

Best tip?  Find a local mentor.  Find a mom in your area who has been homeschooling for awhile and can really get you connected with other homeschoolers (as well as help you navigate the waters of homeschooling legally.)  Having a mentor can make all the difference.  :)




Thankyou for all this information, right now I'm teaching her sign language and the my baby can read program, she is behind devlopmentaly and has other issues and may have the same learning diss abilities I and my husband have. This is why I beleive homeschooling is the best also since he wants to join the military. Right now we live with my inlaws while I job search to save up money for my own bussiness. My main problem is my husband he thinks she will have no friends but I realy want to put her into dance and gymnastics and see if she likes that and if no I will find a class she dose like. I do know some one who homes hooks but she pays $500.00 per kid per year just for this catholic group she says it pays for report cards and testing and such. That's is $2,000 a year for all her kids and that's not even all of it...
MamaSwan001
by on Jul. 23, 2012 at 4:05 PM
Quoting 1mom_under_God:

i think you can start schoolong at any age . im in alabama and they require you start your child at age six. im on my second ye of homeschooling and we make learning out of everything. cooking we count eggs and stuff. my big kids read to my little kids. but like worksheets i get free printables online or a workbook that lasts all year from books a million or amazon.com. its not exspensive. you can have playdates with moms in your area or just take your little baby to the park. my children always make friends at the park.:) 




I live in Florida the law is the same here. I need to do a lot more research lol.. Thankyou
hcusa
by on Jul. 23, 2012 at 4:13 PM

Since you're in Florida, you might want to download a copy of FPEA's Starting Point: http://www.fpea.com/about-home-schooling/getting-started-guide/ (Click on the link in the blue box on the right-hand side.)  It will help you know where to get started.

hcusa
by on Jul. 23, 2012 at 4:23 PM


It does NOT have to cost that much!  We would've been in big trouble otherwise!

As for the Socialization question, you can find plenty of books and studies that will help put your husband's fears to rest.

Years ago my daughter begged us to let her participate in a beauty pageant.  I was against it, until she showed me the program and that girls her age (She was nine then.) were not allowed to wear any make-up.  I finally agreed and she loved it.  She made it into the finals, and won several awards, most notably, the Miss Personality trophy - the only award that was voted on by *both* the judges and the girls themselves.  When they called her name, I sat there in the audience laughing so hard I was crying - not because I was laughing at my daughter, but because as soon as her name was read and she came forward to get the trophy, my husband looked at me and said, "And there's our unsocialized homeschooled daughter. Boy, she'll never make any friends or know how to act around kids her age."  :D

Britania
by on Jul. 24, 2012 at 7:04 AM
1 mom liked this
If you are doing the My Baby Can Read program, check out the Institute for the Achievement of Human Potential. (google it)
The guy who developed the reading program, basically stole it from the institute and his implementation is sub par to the real thing.
The books put out by the institute have a ton of things that you can do to help your baby progress. The program is perfect if you think your baby ready had some delays.


Quoting MamaSwan001:

Quoting hcusa:

You're off to a good start, because you are already thinking ahead and beginning your research.  That's the most important first step.  Go to your public library and check out homeschooling books and read, read, read.

1. & 2.   Find out the homeschool laws for your state.  This link can help you: http://hslda.org/hs/default.asp  Simply click on your state and read the summary of "LAWS: How to legally homeschool in (your state).  This will tell you by what age you must legally start schooling and what you will need to do in terms of accountability, such as submitting a letter of intent to homeschool.  Of course, there's nothing saying you can't "unofficially" start schooling at a younger age, as you are doing, but you will want to keep in mind at what age you must start reporting to your state.

3.  You have plenty of time to research programs and curriculum for your daughter.  Right now, keep things simple and fun as you are doing.  When she's a bit older, you might want to look at Starfall - http://www.starfall.com/ (a free phonics/learn-to-read website), and Head of the Class - http://www.theheadoftheclass.com/, which has free curriculum for preschoolers and goes through 5th grade.  Meanwhile, you will want to become familiar with the many styles of homeschooling.  This includes things like unschooling, eclectic, and more.  Again, your best bet here is to hit your local library and pick up as many books on homeschooling that you can find.

4.  This is a hard question to answer.  You can homeschool for virtually pennies, if you have good internet access and can make regular library visits, or you can spend many hundreds or even thousands of dollars, or something in between those extremes.  You'll be able to answer this question yourself better after you've learned more about homeschooling and have narrowed down what you want to do, what curriculum you want to use, and so on.  (Just FYI:  On average my family spent about $450 a year toward homeschooling our two children and this included a $180 fee to our co-op, all of our curriculum and supplies, and "field trip" money.)

5.  Find some play groups in your area, or even start one yourself.  Your child is likely too young to join any homeschool support groups at this time, but you may be able to find some kind of MOPs group.  Also look for programs like toddler reading time at a local bookstore or your library.  When your daughter gets closer to kindergarten age, that will be the time to start looking for a homeschool group or co-op.  You can find out more information about that by Googling your state's name and "homeschool groups."  Something will come up.

6.  Did I mention going to your library and checking out homeschooling books?  LOL.  There are also some good resources online for new homeschoolers.  Try this link: http://www.thehomeschoolmom.com/newtohomeschooling/#.UA2lVrSe6So.  Also, if your husband does join the military or your daughter is diagnosed with special needs, the Homeschool Foundation may be able to help you.  http://www.homeschoolfoundation.org/index.php?id=22

Best tip?  Find a local mentor.  Find a mom in your area who has been homeschooling for awhile and can really get you connected with other homeschoolers (as well as help you navigate the waters of homeschooling legally.)  Having a mentor can make all the difference.  :)






Thankyou for all this information, right now I'm teaching her sign language and the my baby can read program, she is behind devlopmentaly and has other issues and may have the same learning diss abilities I and my husband have. This is why I beleive homeschooling is the best also since he wants to join the military. Right now we live with my inlaws while I job search to save up money for my own bussiness. My main problem is my husband he thinks she will have no friends but I realy want to put her into dance and gymnastics and see if she likes that and if no I will find a class she dose like. I do know some one who homes hooks but she pays $500.00 per kid per year just for this catholic group she says it pays for report cards and testing and such. That's is $2,000 a year for all her kids and that's not even all of it...

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mclane5
by owner on Jul. 24, 2012 at 5:09 PM
1 mom liked this

 Most librarys have weekly play groups.Also check with your local public school alot of them provide extra cirrcular activities like speech. Also the health department has nurses that will come out for help. I would say at this age I would invest in flashcards. Babies like colors and I would teach her that way. What state do you live in and what ways is she slow? ADD maybe to early to detect this young.

MamaSwan001
by on Jul. 24, 2012 at 9:29 PM
Quoting mclane5:

 Most librarys have weekly play groups.Also check with your local public school alot of them provide extra cirrcular activities like speech. Also the health department has nurses that will come out for help. I would say at this age I would invest in flashcards. Babies like colors and I would teach her that way. What state do you live in and what ways is she slow? ADD maybe to early to detect this young.




I do lots of colors with her, I have books iPad apps and learning toys all with colors and she loves my little pony. She has speech delays, physical delays, and motor skill delays. She is at the level of an 8-9 month old baby at ten months, so it is much better than it used to be
KrissyKC
by Member on Jul. 27, 2012 at 8:32 AM
3 moms liked this

It's really hard to decide on their level of "delay" at that age!   Are you sure she has delays???   Don't create or speak something into her life that isn't there.

I'm only saying that because kids crawl, walk, talk, etc.. at different times and they are perfectly fine.   I don't even see how one would diagnose a speech delay in a 10 month old unless she's just not making any sounds.      My own kids were all walking around 10-11 months, but my brother's kids didn't walk until 14 months, and a girl I used to watch at daycare (a long time ago) was walking by 9 months!   They were all fine, and no real delays...

So... i don't see how you can say she's delayed a month or two...  What are you comparing her to, and is this info coming from your own observations and expectations or is a pediatrician actually putting these ideas into your head.   Because if it's your kid's doc... you need a second opinion.

There's just no way to say she's acting one or two months behind at 10 months old because they develop skills at all different times those first two years.



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