Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

When does comprehension happen?

Posted by on Dec. 30, 2012 at 11:05 PM
  • 17 Replies
  • 655 Total Views

Just wondering when reading comprehension happens.  While reading stories to DD (4 yo), I'll stop during the story to ask questions - and she has no idea the answer to the question.

For example:  reading a story about a skunk who went looking for something to eat.  He first went to the berry patch, but the berries were too green and bitter, so he wandered over to the picnic area to see if there was anything left in a trashcan.  When I ask her where he went first, her first guess is I don't know, when I re-read the passage and ask her again, she guesses the picnic area.  I've re-read the passage up to 4 times before giving up and going on. 

Should she be able to grasp this yet, or do I need to table it for now and just drone on?

Note:  Her favorite books are Mo Willems books and this is one of our first attempts at reading simple chapter books.  Each night we re-cap what we've read up until our current selection, but I'm only asking questions about what we read that night. 

by on Dec. 30, 2012 at 11:05 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
twyliatepeka
by Admin on Dec. 30, 2012 at 11:43 PM
I ask dd (5) questions while we are reading & she can answer. I also ask her questions after we have read things, like the next day, & she can answer.

I am not sure when it happensas a general rule.

I will say that she answers the questions MOST of the time. Sometimes she refuses to answer just because she can (kids are fun) and doesn't want to answer.
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
BramblePatch
by Member on Dec. 31, 2012 at 12:25 AM
We have always practiced narration, so I am not sure. I will say that my DD(4) is an auditory learner and her comprehension is far better than DS(5) who is a visual/kinesthetic learner. DS, though, is reading at a 1st-2nd grade level and is accelerated in all subjects. Every child is different.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Sarahsmommy1008
by Member on Dec. 31, 2012 at 4:22 PM

bramblepatch, can you explain what narration is and how you use it?

I'm also wondering if maybe my timing is off.  In this particular example, we were reading a bedtime story - so #1, she's already tired and not in the most cooperative mood, #2 maybe I should be focusing on the story helping her to relax instead of using it as an opportunity to check for comprehension.  I may save the comprehension questions for during "schooltime" reading. 

BramblePatch
by Member on Dec. 31, 2012 at 5:57 PM
1 mom liked this
Sarah.... Narration is a Charlotte Mason type thing where the kiddo tells back the story. You can read about it at www.simplycharlottemason.com
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
oahoah
by on Jan. 1, 2013 at 12:39 AM

I think it depends on the kid, kind of like reading, they will get it at their own pace. My 3 y/o is comprehending pretty well and we just spend a lot of time looking at books and I'll ask if he sees something and to point it out.  He really liked the I Spy books for a while and I think that helped with comprehension. Does your DD comprehend questions asked on her fave books? Keep trying but I wouldn't push it too much.

P.N._Guin
by Member on Jan. 6, 2013 at 2:20 PM
DS is 4 and really just started to "get it."
He gets flustered if I ask him too long a question, or too many rolled into one. I make a point to ask him very specific questions, and he almost always is able to recall the answer, even a day or more later. I can see his confidence building, and notice Jim answering "I don't know" less and less.
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
metooo
by Bronze Member on Jan. 7, 2013 at 8:29 AM

Can she comprehend picture books? She should be able to understand things like who the main characters are, the basic plot of the story. Following a simple sequence of events is something she should do at four. Like the steps in making a snowman, simple story plots like the three little pigs, etc etc.  She should also be able to answer questions like "what do you think will happen next?" Make simple connections to the stories "have you ever meet a talking skunk?"  "remember last spring when our yard smelled like skunk?" etc etc. 

Some ways to help would be encourage her to draw pictures to go with the story. Reread the same stories over again. Ask questions but don't interup the flow of the story. So like at the begining of the book, read the title, and look at the front cover. "what do you think this book is going to be about?" you can do a picture walk through and just go through and look at the pictures. Then read the story. If the story has some breaks to it, you can stop and help her make a connection (i.e. we ahd a skunk in our garbage remember? Or remember the Biter berries you ate?)  or ask a question like what do you think is going to happen next! (this is great before the climax of a story). Or a simple comprehension question.  Doing book themes is a great way to encourage a love of reading and help with comprehension making connections, etc. 

metooo
by Bronze Member on Jan. 7, 2013 at 8:31 AM

I think you hit it! She could very well of just wanted to be left alone and listen to the story. lol 

Quoting Sarahsmommy1008:

bramblepatch, can you explain what narration is and how you use it?

I'm also wondering if maybe my timing is off.  In this particular example, we were reading a bedtime story - so #1, she's already tired and not in the most cooperative mood, #2 maybe I should be focusing on the story helping her to relax instead of using it as an opportunity to check for comprehension.  I may save the comprehension questions for during "schooltime" reading. 


metooo
by Bronze Member on Jan. 7, 2013 at 8:39 AM

BTW I love Mo willems and Have never seen his chapter books. Please, please share! :D 

Sarahsmommy1008
by Member on Jan. 7, 2013 at 9:26 AM


Quoting metooo:

BTW I love Mo willems and Have never seen his chapter books. Please, please share! :D 

sorry, bad sentence structure - I'm trying to get her to like chapter books, while she prefers Mo Willems books instead (which are not chapter books)  :-) 

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN