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ihss and autism age qualifications

Posted by on Jun. 6, 2014 at 8:37 AM
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I just read about age qualifications for autustic children i have not tried to get any in home care for my autistic son before. He is now 12 and i have basically been with him 24 7 the entire time except while in school. I only go out once or twice a year on Christmas eve because my mother comes to town to spend the holiday i would never go out and leave him with a sitter . MAIN REASON others are not aware of the severity of an autistic child auditory sensory issues, because of tnis my son could be tormented for hours. I will not allow this to happen, not on my watch,
by on Jun. 6, 2014 at 8:37 AM
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alldaylong
by New Member on Jun. 6, 2014 at 9:01 AM
Now i worry that might have focused too much on providing a tranquil and calm environment that i didnt allow my son to adapt and maybe overcome these sensory issues. There have been times when i would test the boundaries by not stepping in to stop a small child from being verbally repetitive which would be highly agitating to my son with disastrous results, which i can compare to the scene on the movie Rainman when he refused to get on the airplane.
seaglassblu
by New Member on Sep. 29, 2014 at 7:32 PM

Trust your intuition concerning your son, no one knows him better than you.  As far as IHSS, you're referring to respite care correct?   I think it would depend on the state in which you live.  In our state it varies from county to county, some counties have more tax funding than others, so it all depends on where you live.  I'm sorry I couldn't be of more help.  It sounds like you are doing what you feel is best for your youngster - sending you hugs, my friend.

MamaLauri
by New Member on Sep. 30, 2014 at 8:58 AM

You can start now. ASD is a learning challenge that can be addressed at any age, but is more effective when the child is very young. Babies with brain architectures that are later labeled ASD, start out with decreased interest in humans (due to differences in the distribution, density, and strength of neurotransmitters and receptors in the oxytocin/dopamine/GABA system and systems they are connected to, including mirror neurons, the "imitation neurons"). This leads to less learning from other humans, a huge part of our human learning system. This is only a tendency and can be increased by explicit activities of loving knowledgeable humans (adults, kids, sometimes with the help of pets). A loving interaction increases oxytocin and indirectly dopamine.

Many kids, labeled ASD, end up with sensory integration challenges for 2 main reasons: the dopamine differences lead to physical coordination challenges, and babies start out with their sensory pathways merged together to allow for multi-sensory recognition of their parents and environment and they do not know what sensory information is safe to ignore, but with time and experience the sensory systems usually separate and we learn to ignore 99% of our senses (you do not feel your clothes or pay attention to background noise or lites). Most of this is learned from interacting with other people. So ASD kids frequently learn much less of this, and have sensory overload. They must be explicitly taught what is safe to ignore. 

Quoting alldaylong: Now i worry that might have focused too much on providing a tranquil and calm environment that i didnt allow my son to adapt and maybe overcome these sensory issues. There have been times when i would test the boundaries by not stepping in to stop a small child from being verbally repetitive which would be highly agitating to my son with disastrous results, which i can compare to the scene on the movie Rainman when he refused to get on the airplane.

 

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