Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Why we boycott

Posted by on Nov. 5, 2007 at 11:13 PM
  • 5 Replies
  • 1397 Total Views

Nestlé-free zone

If you already boycott Nestlé then use the resources on this page to spread the word.

If you want to know why there is a boycott and how you can get involved, read on.

New: 10 October 2007: Following a year-long campaign and a Supreme Court ruling, the Philippines authorities can now take action over aggressive marketing practices.

Nestlé-Free Zone button

Add this image
to your site - instructions

Nestlé is the target of a boycott because it contributes to the unnecessary death and suffering of infants around the world by aggressively marketing baby foods in breach of international marketing standards. Even Nestlé's Public Affairs Manager acknowledges the boycott has widespread support.

According to the World Health Organisation, 1.5 million infants die around the world every year because they are not breastfed. The World Health Assembly has adopted marketing requirements for baby foods to protect breastfeeding and to ensure breastmilk substitutes are used safely if necessary.

Nestlé is singled out for boycott action as monitoring shows it to be responsible for more violations of the requirements than any other company. The boycott helps to stop some of the specific cases of malpractice we expose and has forced some changes in policy. But Nestlé continues systematic violations in those countries which have not yet brought in independently monitored and enforced legislation implementing the marketing requirements, which is another part of our strategy for protecting infant health and mothers' rights.

Evidence of Nestlé malpractice

If you doubt that Nestlé is doing anything wrong, see the monitoring evidence in our codewatch section.

Or see the recent independent investigations conducted by the Guardian (right) and UNICEF Philippines.

We have responded to some of the misinformation given out by Nestlé Public Relations Machine - click here.

Also see the Your Questions Answered section.

Guadian May 2007

Register your support for the boycott

If you are supporting the boycott personally, you can sign our boycott peitition. Using the same form, you can sign up to receive alerts when new information is posted on this site. If you represent a shop, student union or other organisation, you can be listed on our boycott endorsers list.

It is important to tell Nestlé you are supporting the boycott - even if only for Nestlé-Free Week. You can call Nestlé's customer care line (click here to find out what happens when you do) or send an email via the Nestlé website or through the post. Click here for a suggested letter.

  

If you type like an idiot, people will assume you are one.
Group Owner: Nestle boycott

by on Nov. 5, 2007 at 11:13 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-5):
muslimah
by on Jan. 21, 2008 at 10:47 PM
Forgive me for my ignorance, are you saying that they lack in proper nutrition and by mothers who may not know that choosing Nestle, this is leading to their deaths? I'm not sure if I'm getting this right or not.

wearingyourbaby
by Group Admin on Jan. 21, 2008 at 11:25 PM

Quoting muslimah:

Forgive me for my ignorance, are you saying that they lack in proper nutrition and by mothers who may not know that choosing Nestle, this is leading to their deaths? I'm not sure if I'm getting this right or not.


It's not that mothers choose Nestle, it's more the fact that the company, Nestle, LIES to the mothers, telling them that their breastmilk isn't good (when, in fact, it is the best they can give under those circumstances).  When an adult woman, even one who lacks proper nutrition, gives breastmilk, there is a very low, if not non-existent chance of contamination to the baby.  A baby whose immune system is weak...often VERY weak under these situations, NEEDS breastmilk.  To give a baby formula mixed with contaminated water, and to CHARGE mothers for this formula...often promising it will be there next month often to find it isn't...is just wrong. Breastmilk is free for these women...it's safe, it's important to their survival.  And nestle will go to ANY length to sabotage a breastfeeding relationship with a mother.

While I do think every baby should be breastfed, this really isn't about breast vs. formula....it's about nestles lack of concern for infants dying as a result of their shady marketing practices. 

Tessa~Mommy to 4 boys: 9, 7, 6 & 2

Click here if you are breastfeeding a toddler!

Click here if you want to know how Nestle' kills babies!

Click here if your DH has Diabetes

Feel free to contact me, if you need to, about any issue.

RanaAurora
by Group Owner on Apr. 5, 2008 at 5:02 PM
I wanted to add this article as well, about Nestle's practices with bottled water:
http://www.stopcorporateabuse.org/cms/page1669.cfm

Terry Swier moved from Flint, Mich. to Mecosta County, an area full of cold water trout streams and pristine lakes –lakes that attract outdoor enthusiasts from across the Great Lakes Region.[1]

Unfortunately for Swier, she soon encountered a not-so-friendly neighbor. In 2001, she learned that Nestlé, the largest bottled water corporation in the world, was planning to pump more than 500,000 gallons of water a day from a nearby aquifer. The water would then be shipped outside of the Great Lakes Basin, under the brand name Ice Mountain.[2]

When local officials failed to respond, Swier and her neighbors took Nestlé to court. In 2003, the court ruled against Nestlé, concluding that the company’s actions were likely to narrow streams, expose mud flats and reduce flow levels.[3] Pumping was ordered to a halt. This didn’t stop Nestlé. The corporation successfully appealed the case to the Supreme Court of Michigan, ultimately arguing that citizen groups had no right to sue to protect local water resources.[4]

Unfortunately, Swier’s experience with Nestlé is not a unique one. From California to Michigan to Maine, Nestlé is interfering in local, democratic decision-making over water.[5]

Nestlé’s disputes with communities like Swier’s, recently catapulted the debate into the halls of Congress, where a House subcommittee is looking at how water bottling plants impact communities, the effect of extraction on watersheds and wetlands, and the adequacy of national and state laws in addressing these issues.[6]

Leaving communities high and dry
Nestle aggressively utilizes the courts and political process to preserve its dominance in the bottled water industry.

In California, Nestlé is working to control water from the springs of Mount Shasta. The corporation negotiated a backroom deal in which it would pay 1/64 of a cent per gallon for the next half a century, while selling it back to the public at thousands of times the price.[7] The Concerned McCloud Citizens successfully challenged Nestlé in court on the grounds that Nestlé failed to submit an environmental impact statement but Nestlé brought the case to an appeals court to overturn the verdict.[8]

 

Nestlé negotiated a backroom deal in which it would pay 1/64 of a cent per gallon of water for the next half century, while selling it back to the public at thousands of times the price.

In Maine, Nestlé operates at least six wells and two bottling plants under the Poland Spring label and is hoping to expand its operations.[9] Local residents in some communities are concerned that Nestlé will get priority access to the same water that feeds their local water utility. Residents are also concerned that Nestlé’s extraction will adversely impact local ecosystems and wells.[10] In response to a community group’s attempt to tax Nestlé’s bottled water within the state, Nestlé gave over $218,000 to a political action committee (PAC) called Maine Citizens Against Taxing Water. The PAC opposed the initiative and waged an aggressive media and public relations campaign to discredit those supportive of the tax on plastic water bottles.[11]

Corporate snapshot
Nestlé is a transnational packaged food company founded and headquartered in Switzerland. It is the largest bottled water corporation in the world, with over 70 brands sold in 130 countries.[12]

Nestlé is a heavyweight in several food sectors, including milk, chocolate, confectionery, bottled water, coffee, ice cream, food seasoning and pet foods.[13]

And aside from its chocolate bar, Nestlé is perhaps best known for its marketing of infant formula in some of the world’s poorest countries – marketing that lead to a worldwide Nestlé boycott that began in 1977 and continues to this day. The World Health Assembly has called upon Nestlé to adhere to an International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes, but the corporation has thus far refused. According to the United Nations Children’s Fund, “marketing practices that undermine breastfeeding are potentially hazardous wherever they are pursued: in the developing world, WHO estimates that some 1.5 million children die each year because they are not adequately breastfed.”

The global food giant has been implicated in labor rights violations throughout the Global South, including the exploitation of children in the cocoa fields of the Ivory Coast.[14]

In Michigan, Nestlé is aggressively seeking control of water in the Great Lakes basin,[15] which contains almost a fifth of the world's available freshwater resources.[16] Nestlé currently operates several wells and one bottling plant in the state, extracting millions of gallons of water every year, and continues to search for more well sites, often in sensitive watershed areas.[17]

Take action
Join people around the world in challenging corporations like Nestlé that are undermining local control of water resources. Corporate Accountability International's Think Outside the Bottle campaign challenges the bottled water industry to halt its irresponsible and dangerous abuses. Visit www.StopCorporateAbuse.org to send a letter to Nestlé today.

To learn more about, and support, the ongoing boycott of Nestlé for its aggressive marketing of infant formula visit Baby Milk Action at www.BabyMilkAction.org or the International Baby Food Action Network at www.IBFAN.org

For more information on Nestlé’s labor rights violations, visit the International Labor Rights Forum at www.LaborRights.org.

Gakobow
by on Apr. 7, 2008 at 11:43 AM
I understand the whole reasoning behind it... kids die from mother's feeding them formula instead of breastmilk. yada yada, sad... I know. what I'm kind of confused about is, If the formula were any other brand name, would this really be a big issue on Nestle? or is this JUST about them "lying" to 3rd world mothers who breastfeed? just wanted to know...

-G
RanaAurora
by Group Owner on Apr. 7, 2008 at 2:11 PM

Quoting Gakobow:

I understand the whole reasoning behind it... kids die from mother's feeding them formula instead of breastmilk. yada yada, sad... I know. what I'm kind of confused about is, If the formula were any other brand name, would this really be a big issue on Nestle? or is this JUST about them "lying" to 3rd world mothers who breastfeed? just wanted to know...

-G
It would be the same, regardless of what company it was.  The company was warned NOT to do what they did, did it anyway, lied to women and broke bits of the WHO/UNICEF'S international Code that ALL formula companies have agreed to abide by... and most importantly... their lying, underhanded actions led to the deaths of babies. 
It's NOT about formula vs. breastfeeding only.  I don't want ANYONE to think that this is just "another breastfeeding advocate's attempt at saying all formula is bad" because it's not.  It has to do with the individual needs of this specific country, and that the company decided to go against the warnings of the WHO and UNICEF, and went so far as to lie to women to promote their product... and when the warning they were given came true, rather than trying to clean up their mess, they ditched out, leaving women with sick children, dried up milk, and worse off than they had been in the first place.

Had they been promoting somewhere that had clean water and more medicine, it would have been general, everyday promotion of a product... but they were taking advantage of these women, swearing that their product would SAVE their babies from AIDS... when instead, it killed more of them than AIDS would have.

That's what it's about.  Lies and deceit that led to the death of babies.
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)