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Need help with my dog. Please.

Posted by on Feb. 12, 2012 at 8:41 PM
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 Really need some help and quickly.... We have a fourin a half year old German Shepherd Husky mix. He is a very sweet boy but he is also extremely hyper. And not to mention super strong. He is very bashful about coming into the house. We have tried to let him in but he acts scared and wants to go back out. So we let him back out and he is happy. However times that we do let him in by forcing him which we hate to do he destroys things. We don't yell at him but we put him back out and tell him NO. Then we givehim chew toys ect... He loves balls. Well my husband is the only one who can walk him. Like I said he is extremely strong. Well my husband has hurt his hand and right now is one handed for a while. That means our poor dog can not be walked. I can't walk him because he would pull me down and drag me. He really needs obedience training however places around here charge literally an arm and a leg for training. We can not afford that. I have thought about getting him a muzzle leash. You know the leaches that go around their muzzle when you walk them that way they can not pull. We also have been watching a lot of dog training videos that show you how to properly walk your dog. They make that look so easy. To bad its not. So we have been trying to work with him before my husband got hurt. So since then we haven't been able to give our dog much attention at all. I have tried to go out and play with him but he is so hyper and well to be honest kind of dangerous because he jumps on you and has knocked me down several times making my glasses fly off my face and scratched me up pretty badly. But he really needs to rid himself of all the built up energy. I just do not know how or what we can do for him. We have asked so many people around our area if they know of a place that we can safely let him run loose and play while we throw a ball back and forth to him (thats his fav. game). The few places people have suggested has no tresspassing signs up so we don't want to risk it.

So my question first would be how can we ride him of all his energy and have more of a calm dog, one that doesn't jump on you and knock you down. Second... has anyone tried those muzzled leashes? Thirdly is there any advice you can give me that will help us train him at home. Like I said we would love to do professional obedience classes but we can no afford 180 (the cheapest we found) an hour.

Thanks for all the input. I would hate to get rid of him. He such a sweet boy who just needs lots of love and play time. I want to give him that but I don't know how with out getting hurt.

by on Feb. 12, 2012 at 8:41 PM
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Replies (1-9):
KyliesMom5
by Member on Feb. 12, 2012 at 8:54 PM

Get him a gentle leader head halter (not a halti). That will help teach him not to pull. However, you will need to be consistant and use it all the time because they do fight it in the beginning. Especially, if the dog is domanant or head strong.  

How is he with other dogs? If you have a dog park I would take him so that he can run.  Once he was some training under his belt you might run him with a bike. That is what I do with one of mine

If you want him to be an indoor dog you need to get him a crate so that he will not destroy things. Don't leave him unattended in the house this means that where ever you are he needs to be or he should go in the crate.  

When you go outside to play with him and he jumps on you do not look touch or say anything to him, just turn away from him. When all four feet are on the floor give him a treat.  You can also teach him to sit when he approaches by luring him with a treat. Keep the treat low so he won't be tempted to jump and then as him to sit as he is coming towards you.  Now this will only work if he knows sit so I would start by teaching him the basics first.  I prefer the clicker training method. 

JessicaPoff
by on Feb. 12, 2012 at 9:03 PM

 Thank you so much for the info. I really appreciate it. Must people would have spoken nagatively towards me and said to find him a better home then what I can give him. Thank you for not doing that..

I am trying to picture what the leader head halter is.. I will look that up and look into it more. I def. want something that will get him to not pull. He is very dominate. He does well at times with other dogs but he is very dominate towords them. The only time I have seem him get aggressive is when he is eating or if a dog goes near his food bowl. WATCH OUT. He does not tolerate that at all. Most of the time though he just pins the dog down to let them know he is in control but he does not hurt them. Mainly sits on them. He is a big boy.

Quoting KyliesMom5:

Get him a gentle leader head halter (not a halti). That will help teach him not to pull. However, you will need to be consistant and use it all the time because they do fight it in the beginning. Especially, if the dog is domanant or head strong.  

How is he with other dogs? If you have a dog park I would take him so that he can run.  Once he was some training under his belt you might run him with a bike. That is what I do with one of mine

If you want him to be an indoor dog you need to get him a crate so that he will not destroy things. Don't leave him unattended in the house this means that where ever you are he needs to be or he should go in the crate.  

When you go outside to play with him and he jumps on you do not look touch or say anything to him, just turn away from him. When all four feet are on the floor give him a treat.  You can also teach him to sit when he approaches by luring him with a treat. Keep the treat low so he won't be tempted to jump and then as him to sit as he is coming towards you.  Now this will only work if he knows sit so I would start by teaching him the basics first.  I prefer the clicker training method. 

 

KyliesMom5
by Member on Feb. 12, 2012 at 9:49 PM

This is what the Gentle leader head halter looks like

JessicaPoff
by on Feb. 12, 2012 at 10:18 PM

 

Quoting KyliesMom5:

This is what the Gentle leader head halter looks like

 Ok Yeahthats the one I am talking about getting. Didn't know thats what it was called. I saw a lady the other day in the park and she had one on her dog and saidit works well.

PZRM
by Member on Feb. 13, 2012 at 12:22 AM
I honestly didn't read all of your post (short attention span right now lol) but head halters are wonderful! And Prong collars. Our German Shepard (female) listened to that better at first. She's big (solid 80+lbs of muscle) but not huge. Our pit mix though.. It is the only thing that will get him to listen. He's the sweetest dog! But he's strong! About 60lbs but he pulls like a dog twice his size. lol. Must be the breed....
BUT. Yes. For walks: Halter or prong collar. For energy control it sounds like running around for an hour or two would help. Do you have a backyard? When he tries to jump, be firm. Tell him no and do not give any positive attention. Turn away and repeat your command until he listens.

Havin hubby help when he gets better will sure be a relief too I'm sure! Just don't give up, google dog training classes nearby that you can go to to train yourself to train your dog. I trained both my dogs growing up by going to a set of classes that taught me how to teach them and they would make sure that everyone was reinforcing it correctly and you'd come back with your dog in two weeks to learn something new and show off the last thing they learned...

Good luck!! They are great dogs once you get through to them ;)
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hightideatsea
by Member on Feb. 14, 2012 at 11:32 AM

Wow...I dont know where you live but I did obedience training with my great dane and it was only $89 for 6 weeks!  And the trainer came out one hour a week, and showed me how to properly do  the skill and I had to work on it twice a day for 15 minutes each session.  Then the following week we'd work on a new skill.  I was lucky as the trainer I had competed in Dog shows and trials so she took me beyond the basic obedience.  But I had called the place that offered puppy classes and they were booked up and refered me to my trainer. 

The halter type lead in the pic provided by another poster should help with control, I've heard those are very good tho Ive never had to use one. 

All I can suggest is what I've learned from my training and that is when you are walking your dog, if he starts to pull ahead or run...make a loud noise and turn around and go in the opposite direction.  then turn back around and go in the direction you want to go....keep repeating this until he gets the message that if he goes ahead of you, he will not get to go in the direction he is wanting to go.  My neighbors all got a kick out watching me trying to take my dog for a walk...lol...after a couple of days though of doing this method we were able to walk completely around the block with her at my heals the entire time.  A cat could run out in front of us and she would not leave my heals. 

good luck! 

JessicaPoff
by on Feb. 14, 2012 at 3:27 PM

 I live in NC... I actually did more search on dog training inmy area and foundthis one site. I emailed the guy. HAHAHA He does at home visits and will do 6 sessions for 500. I think thats unreal. If Iknew they made that money I should have went to a school that taught dog training and got my certificate in it.

Quoting hightideatsea:

Wow...I dont know where you live but I did obedience training with my great dane and it was only $89 for 6 weeks!  And the trainer came out one hour a week, and showed me how to properly do  the skill and I had to work on it twice a day for 15 minutes each session.  Then the following week we'd work on a new skill.  I was lucky as the trainer I had competed in Dog shows and trials so she took me beyond the basic obedience.  But I had called the place that offered puppy classes and they were booked up and refered me to my trainer. 

The halter type lead in the pic provided by another poster should help with control, I've heard those are very good tho Ive never had to use one. 

All I can suggest is what I've learned from my training and that is when you are walking your dog, if he starts to pull ahead or run...make a loud noise and turn around and go in the opposite direction.  then turn back around and go in the direction you want to go....keep repeating this until he gets the message that if he goes ahead of you, he will not get to go in the direction he is wanting to go.  My neighbors all got a kick out watching me trying to take my dog for a walk...lol...after a couple of days though of doing this method we were able to walk completely around the block with her at my heals the entire time.  A cat could run out in front of us and she would not leave my heals. 

good luck! 

 

hightideatsea
by Member on Feb. 15, 2012 at 10:56 AM

I lived in SC when I had my training done.  What is that guy thinking $500?? At those prices you might be better off doing it yourself!  Are you able to check the library for some dog training books?  Also, I forgot to mention yesterday..I dont know if your dog is food-oriented or not...but mine was and it really helped when I was teaching her to walk on the leash at my side by holding her favorite treat off to the side just above her nose.  Every few feet I'd treat her and say "good girl.. or yes" and repeat.  If not doing what I asked she'd get an "AH AH or NO" and we'd turn around and start over. 

Also since jumping is a problem for him, you could work on that as well.  Use treats it will help!  Show him that you have the treats...tell him to sit...treat him if he does.  When he goes to jump up, tell him loud and firmly NO and turn around facing in the opposite direction with your arms folded.  Showing him that you are going to "ignore" him when he jumps up will eventually show him that you are not going to give that behavior attention.  Turn back around tell him to sit and get as close to him as you can...if he stays sitting and does not jump treat him.  and also give him lots of praise....GOOD BOY!!....  We had this same issue with our two year old Lab during feeding time...he was like a jumping bean.  And every time I would bend down to set his dish down, if he'd charge at it, Id pick it back up and tell him NO...sit....wait.....then I d repeat.  After 15 minutes he got the idea he was not to touch that dish until I told him OK.... (he already knew sit and wait as he is a hunting dog)  But everyone I've talked too that has the jumping issues, all have tried the turning around and ignoring and it really seems to work but...repeat, repeat, repeat. 


 

Quoting JessicaPoff:

 I live in NC... I actually did more search on dog training inmy area and foundthis one site. I emailed the guy. HAHAHA He does at home visits and will do 6 sessions for 500. I think thats unreal. If Iknew they made that money I should have went to a school that taught dog training and got my certificate in it.

Quoting hightideatsea:

Wow...I dont know where you live but I did obedience training with my great dane and it was only $89 for 6 weeks!  And the trainer came out one hour a week, and showed me how to properly do  the skill and I had to work on it twice a day for 15 minutes each session.  Then the following week we'd work on a new skill.  I was lucky as the trainer I had competed in Dog shows and trials so she took me beyond the basic obedience.  But I had called the place that offered puppy classes and they were booked up and refered me to my trainer. 

The halter type lead in the pic provided by another poster should help with control, I've heard those are very good tho Ive never had to use one. 

All I can suggest is what I've learned from my training and that is when you are walking your dog, if he starts to pull ahead or run...make a loud noise and turn around and go in the opposite direction.  then turn back around and go in the direction you want to go....keep repeating this until he gets the message that if he goes ahead of you, he will not get to go in the direction he is wanting to go.  My neighbors all got a kick out watching me trying to take my dog for a walk...lol...after a couple of days though of doing this method we were able to walk completely around the block with her at my heals the entire time.  A cat could run out in front of us and she would not leave my heals. 

good luck! 

 


momsewbusy
by on Mar. 9, 2012 at 7:29 PM

Couple things we have found helpful for very active "big" dogs, and we have great white Pyrenese.   They get very mellow after the young adolescent and teen ages, but until then, they too are very active, plus they are big and very strong.  

A treadmill works great at getting them some walking exercise.   Watch your local "free-cycle group, usually a yahoo group (can even ask if anyone has one they no longer use or want they are willing to give you) or they are found quite often for free or very inexpensively on Craig's List.   This is a great way to get them some walking or running exercise to burn some of that energy.

Another way for them to play and burn a lot of energy is with a ball with a long rope attached to it and then the other end of the rope attached to a pole such as one similar to a clothesline pole.   They can chase and toss that ball til their heart's content.  

You said he prefers to be outside.    Another game our dogs love is a little hard-shell type kiddie pool that we keep full of water.   They LOVE to play in it on warm days.    During summer, they also love to run, play, and chase each other with the water hose, and also play in the sprinkler, which waters the lawn while they're doing so.  

Toys --- mine also find great delight in noise making baby toys.    Stuffed ones, electronic ones that make sounds, plastic, and ropes with items tied to the ends they can drag around.   Hope this helps.

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