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Do you think this could be a good match

Posted by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 10:04 AM
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We are looking into adopting a 4 yo female bordercollie. Does anyone have any knowledge on how this breed gets along with small dogs?  We have a min-pin. Our min-pin is a bad barker (she is 2) & we are hoping that by getting another dog she won't be so protective & territorial.  Have you heard of this being corrective? There is quite a difference in size, & I have never been for having a bigger dog inside (but we like our animals around us), plus it looked like she shed quite a bit, but she could have just been nervous...  We introduced the two yesterday at the vets office & they got along fine, but guess it's not the same as a house. We also introduced ours to a pug & that was a disaster.  The pug pushed our dog down & we quickly split them up. Also she tested positive for heart worm but she has been treated & has low level.  Does anyone have any knowledge of this & if it causes later problems with a dog this age esp?

by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 10:04 AM
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marshsmom
by Member on Jul. 17, 2013 at 12:54 PM

First of all, please research the border collie breed and make sure you understand what you're gettign into.  This breed is highly intelligent and active and they really need ahome where they can get a lot of mental stimulation and physical exercise.  A simple walk in the neighborhood each day simply won't do for a BC and when they get bored they can demonstrate problem behavior. As far as getting another dog to solve the problem of a dog you already have:  sometimes it's helpful, but it is not recommended.  Your dog's barking is probably not at all related to how many dogs are there, and if it is in fact "being protective" another dog will do little to change that protective nature.  What is it that makes you believe your dogs barking is a protective behavior?  What have you tried to do to eliminate this behavior? 

For heartworms, many dogs can get a false positive result for up to 6 months after treatment.  With regular monthly preventative the dog should test negative eventually.  Heart worms do cause damage to the heart, but you may never know and most dogs who undergo the treatment come out of it fine with no lasting effects and they go on to live long healthy lives.  

cat4458
by New Member on Jul. 19, 2013 at 3:54 PM

Thanks for your information.  We decided not to pursue this dog, because of the exercise this dog would need.  We live on an acre of land but it isn't fenced in nor a invisiable fence.  She nipped at me when we went for a 2nd visit. She went to a previous home & nipped at the kids & they brought her back.  She had been severely abused and although we have had 4 abused dogs in the past with having another dog adopted a little over a year ago who was also severely beat I don't think it would be good timing to do this adoption of another home. We have 2 cats also & our home is pretty centered & calm now.  I like it this way & I just don't know after spending 250.00 to adopt and then having to go also to the vet with this dog.  As far as the protective bark.  I don't know for sure it is that but it may be 'a little dog' syndrome as she is a min-pin & she may just be barking to act big cuz she is so... small. We have tried interupting the barking when she is out, it works but just for a minute or 2 then she is right back at it.  The worst is when the doorbell rings, it's like an attack.  We have to put her in another room till the person gets inside as she jumps all over them.  Wish I knew how to stop that. 


Quoting marshsmom:

First of all, please research the border collie breed and make sure you understand what you're gettign into.  This breed is highly intelligent and active and they really need ahome where they can get a lot of mental stimulation and physical exercise.  A simple walk in the neighborhood each day simply won't do for a BC and when they get bored they can demonstrate problem behavior. As far as getting another dog to solve the problem of a dog you already have:  sometimes it's helpful, but it is not recommended.  Your dog's barking is probably not at all related to how many dogs are there, and if it is in fact "being protective" another dog will do little to change that protective nature.  What is it that makes you believe your dogs barking is a protective behavior?  What have you tried to do to eliminate this behavior? 

For heartworms, many dogs can get a false positive result for up to 6 months after treatment.  With regular monthly preventative the dog should test negative eventually.  Heart worms do cause damage to the heart, but you may never know and most dogs who undergo the treatment come out of it fine with no lasting effects and they go on to live long healthy lives.  


 

marshsmom
by Member on Jul. 22, 2013 at 12:33 PM
Try teaching her to "get the ball" or a toy instead of barking. This is how I am working with my crazy dog. When I see him begin to act excited about people in front of the house or when the door bell rings I tell him "get your ball!" It's not perfect yet, but it helps. He has started to get his ball in his own when he is excited, which is what I want him to do vs charging the door barking like mad. Plus, it's kinda hard to bark with a big tennis ball in your mouth! Lol


Quoting cat4458:

Thanks for your information.  We decided not to pursue this dog, because of the exercise this dog would need.  We live on an acre of land but it isn't fenced in nor a invisiable fence.  She nipped at me when we went for a 2nd visit. She went to a previous home & nipped at the kids & they brought her back.  She had been severely abused and although we have had 4 abused dogs in the past with having another dog adopted a little over a year ago who was also severely beat I don't think it would be good timing to do this adoption of another home. We have 2 cats also & our home is pretty centered & calm now.  I like it this way & I just don't know after spending 250.00 to adopt and then having to go also to the vet with this dog.  As far as the protective bark.  I don't know for sure it is that but it may be 'a little dog' syndrome as she is a min-pin & she may just be barking to act big cuz she is so... small. We have tried interupting the barking when she is out, it works but just for a minute or 2 then she is right back at it.  The worst is when the doorbell rings, it's like an attack.  We have to put her in another room till the person gets inside as she jumps all over them.  Wish I knew how to stop that. 




Quoting marshsmom:


First of all, please research the border collie breed and make sure you understand what you're gettign into.  This breed is highly intelligent and active and they really need ahome where they can get a lot of mental stimulation and physical exercise.  A simple walk in the neighborhood each day simply won't do for a BC and when they get bored they can demonstrate problem behavior. As far as getting another dog to solve the problem of a dog you already have:  sometimes it's helpful, but it is not recommended.  Your dog's barking is probably not at all related to how many dogs are there, and if it is in fact "being protective" another dog will do little to change that protective nature.  What is it that makes you believe your dogs barking is a protective behavior?  What have you tried to do to eliminate this behavior? 


For heartworms, many dogs can get a false positive result for up to 6 months after treatment.  With regular monthly preventative the dog should test negative eventually.  Heart worms do cause damage to the heart, but you may never know and most dogs who undergo the treatment come out of it fine with no lasting effects and they go on to live long healthy lives.  




 


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