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2 year old with Diabetes!

Posted by on Oct. 27, 2010 at 11:16 AM
  • 19 Replies

So my friend's 2 year old son was just diagnosed with diabetes last night. She told me she suspected it because he was tired, his breath smelled weird, and he was peeing an obscene amount. He was also really pale and couldn't get enough to drink. This is crazy to me. I had no idea a toddler could even get diabetes. He will have to be on insulin the rest of his life. How does this happen? Does anything cause this or does it just happen? I love my friend and I know she loves her son. But she did a lot of things with him as a baby that I wouldn't have done. Giving him full bottles of water at 2 months old, giving him icecream cones at 4 months, don't get me wrong I am not perfect but she made a lot of stupid decisions with him during his life. Could that be why or is just hereditary? Not that it matters. But this is so sad to me. At least she noticed the signs. I couldn't imagine. He was born one month before my 2 year old. Even though I haven't got to see him much I feel a bond with him simply because of him being so close to age with him. :( Anyone else know kids who have gotten diabetes? I hope he is okay :(

by on Oct. 27, 2010 at 11:16 AM
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Replies (1-10):
NakiahsMommy
by on Oct. 27, 2010 at 11:21 AM
Nope, type 1 diabetes (or juvenile diabetes) isn't "caused" by anything...type 2 diabetes (or adult onset) is usually caused by lifestyle factors.
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LyTe684
by on Oct. 27, 2010 at 11:22 AM

It'a an autoimmune disease. Nothing she did could have caused this. I am also a Type 1.

Jennifer_236
by Bronze Member on Oct. 27, 2010 at 11:22 AM

My husband sister son has it and he got it when he was 3 and he has type 1

LyTe684
by on Oct. 27, 2010 at 11:28 AM

Type 1 Diabetes

(continued)

Who Gets Type 1 Diabetes?

Although the disease usually starts in people under the age of 20, type 1 diabetes may occur at any age.

The disease is relatively uncommon, affecting 1 in 250 Americans. The condition is more common in whites than in blacks and occurs equally in men and women.

What Causes Type 1 Diabetes?

Doctors don't know all the factors that lead to type 1 diabetes. Clearly, the susceptibility to the condition can be inherited.

Doctors have identified that an environmental trigger plays a role in causing the disease. Type 1 diabetes appears to occur when something in the environment -- a toxin or a virus (but doctors aren't sure) -- triggers the immune system to mistakenly attack the pancreas and destroy the beta cells of the pancreas to the point where they can no longer produce sufficient insulin. Markers of this destruction -- called autoantibodies -- can be seen in most people with type 1 diabetes. In fact, they are present in 85% to 90% of people with the condition when the blood sugars are high.

Because it's an autoimmune disease, type 1 diabetes can occur along with other autoimmune diseases such as hyperthyroidism from Grave's disease or the patchy decrease in skin pigmentation that occurs with vitiligo.

What Are the Symptoms of Type 1 Diabetes?

The symptoms of type 1 diabetes are often subtle, but they can become severe. They include:

  • Increased thirst
  • Increased hunger (especially after eating)
  • Dry mouth
  • Nausea and occasionally vomiting
  • Abdominal pain
  • Frequent urination
  • Unexplained weight loss (even though you are eating and feel hungry)
  • Fatigue (weak, tired feeling)
  • Blurred vision
  • Heavy, labored breathing (Kussmaul respiration)
  • Frequent infections of the skin, urinary tract, or vagina

Signs of an emergency with type 1 diabetes include:

  • Shaking and confusion
  • Rapid breathing
  • Fruity smell to the breath
  • Abdominal pain
  • Loss of consciousness (rare)

How Is Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosed?

If your health care provider suspects type 1 diabetes, he will first check for abnormalities in your blood (high blood sugar level). In addition, he may look for glucose or ketone bodies in the urine.

There is currently no way to screen for or prevent the development of type 1 diabetes.

Learn more about diabetes blood tests.

cndennis
by on Oct. 27, 2010 at 11:31 AM

type one is not a result of diet but may be hereditary. for type1 the pancreaus (sp) quits producing insulin. there is nothing you can do about it but give insulin.

my 2 year old was diagnosed this past just with type 1 diabetes and it was very scary for us.

she was acting the same way and I didnt know the signs so by the time we took her to the er for the irregular breathing it was bad. her sugar was at 598 when we went to the er. she spent 4 days in a picu and we are doing well.

it is alot of work, and takes alot of care and education but once you understand how this works it does get easier and a little less stressful. there will be some changes for your friend for sure and she will need your support to get through it. i don't know if i could have made it through these last few months if it were for my support group. please tell her that she will make mistakes and forget things, don't give up it gets easier and IT WILL BE HARD. I have made many mistakes and we are still making it through. my daughters A1C was 11.4 in June and as of October it is down to 8.5.

if you have any questions just ask..i'm willing to help anyone..i just went through what she is giong through...i'm no expert, and i am still struggling with it..but we will make it!

DeacnConsMom
by on Oct. 27, 2010 at 11:32 AM


Quoting LyTe684:

It'a an autoimmune disease. Nothing she did could have caused this. I am also a Type 1.


I didn't think so. Thats good though. She just has a crazy drama filled dangerous life lol and i didn't know if it was the lifestyle.

DeacnConsMom
by on Oct. 27, 2010 at 11:34 AM

Aww thank you so much! I will definitely support her. She's not perfect but she has the best of intentions and loves him so much.

Quoting cndennis:

type one is not a result of diet but may be hereditary. for type1 the pancreaus (sp) quits producing insulin. there is nothing you can do about it but give insulin.

my 2 year old was diagnosed this past just with type 1 diabetes and it was very scary for us.

she was acting the same way and I didnt know the signs so by the time we took her to the er for the irregular breathing it was bad. her sugar was at 598 when we went to the er. she spent 4 days in a picu and we are doing well.

it is alot of work, and takes alot of care and education but once you understand how this works it does get easier and a little less stressful. there will be some changes for your friend for sure and she will need your support to get through it. i don't know if i could have made it through these last few months if it were for my support group. please tell her that she will make mistakes and forget things, don't give up it gets easier and IT WILL BE HARD. I have made many mistakes and we are still making it through. my daughters A1C was 11.4 in June and as of October it is down to 8.5.

if you have any questions just ask..i'm willing to help anyone..i just went through what she is giong through...i'm no expert, and i am still struggling with it..but we will make it!


LyTe684
by on Oct. 27, 2010 at 11:34 AM


Quoting DeacnConsMom:


Quoting LyTe684:

It'a an autoimmune disease. Nothing she did could have caused this. I am also a Type 1.


I didn't think so. Thats good though. She just has a crazy drama filled dangerous life lol and i didn't know if it was the lifestyle.

:-) A lot of people don't know. Especially since Type 2 is the one most talked about. I get told all the time that I caused my diabetes by eating junk. I wish her and her baby all the best. It will be hard and very trying at times, I will admit. But eventually it gets easier.. especially when the baby gets older and can tell what they feel.

LyTe684
by on Oct. 27, 2010 at 11:56 AM

Oh what he's going through right now is called Diabetic Ketoacidosis, or DKA.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) - Topic Overview

What is diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)?

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition that develops when cells in the body are unable to get the sugar (glucose) they need for energy, such as when you have diabetes and do not take enough insulin. Without insulin, the body cannot use sugar for energy. When the cells do not receive sugar, the body begins to break down fat and muscle for energy. When this happens, ketones, or fatty acids, are produced and enter the bloodstream, causing the chemical imbalance (metabolic acidosis) called diabetic ketoacidosis.

What causes DKA?

Ketoacidosis can be caused by not taking enough insulin, having a severe infection or other illness, becoming severely dehydrated, or some combination of these factors. It can occur in people who have little or no insulin in their bodies (mostly people with type 1 diabetes, but it can happen with type 2 diabetes) when their blood sugar levels are high.

What are the symptoms?

Your blood sugar may be quite high before you notice symptoms, which include:

  • Flushed, hot, dry skin.
  • Blurred vision.
  • Feeling thirsty.
  • Drowsiness or difficulty waking up. Young children may lack interest in their normal activities.
  • Rapid, deep breathing.
  • A strong, fruity breath odor.
  • Loss of appetite, abdominal pain, and vomiting.
  • Confusion.

When diabetic ketoacidosis is severe, you may have difficulty breathing, your brain may swell (cerebral edema), and there is a risk of coma and even death.

How is DKA diagnosed?

Laboratory tests, including blood and urine tests, are used to confirm a diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis. Urine dipstick tests for ketones are available for home use. Keep some nearby in case your blood sugar level becomes high.

How is it treated?

When ketoacidosis is severe, it must be treated in the hospital, often in an intensive care unit. Treatment involves giving insulin and fluids through a vein and closely monitoring certain chemicals in the blood (electrolytes). It can take several days for your blood sugar level and fluid status to return to a safe range.

Who is at risk for DKA?

If you have type 1 diabetes, you are at risk for DKA if you do not take enough insulin, have a severe infection or other illness, or become severely dehydrated. In some cases DKA can be the first sign of diabetes.

DeacnConsMom
by on Oct. 27, 2010 at 12:00 PM


Quoting LyTe684:

Oh what he's going through right now is called Diabetic Ketoacidosis, or DKA.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) - Topic Overview

What is diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)?

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition that develops when cells in the body are unable to get the sugar (glucose) they need for energy, such as when you have diabetes and do not take enough insulin. Without insulin, the body cannot use sugar for energy. When the cells do not receive sugar, the body begins to break down fat and muscle for energy. When this happens, ketones, or fatty acids, are produced and enter the bloodstream, causing the chemical imbalance (metabolic acidosis) called diabetic ketoacidosis.

What causes DKA?

Ketoacidosis can be caused by not taking enough insulin, having a severe infection or other illness, becoming severely dehydrated, or some combination of these factors. It can occur in people who have little or no insulin in their bodies (mostly people with type 1 diabetes, but it can happen with type 2 diabetes) when their blood sugar levels are high.

What are the symptoms?

Your blood sugar may be quite high before you notice symptoms, which include:

  • Flushed, hot, dry skin.
  • Blurred vision.
  • Feeling thirsty.
  • Drowsiness or difficulty waking up. Young children may lack interest in their normal activities.
  • Rapid, deep breathing.
  • A strong, fruity breath odor.
  • Loss of appetite, abdominal pain, and vomiting.
  • Confusion.

When diabetic ketoacidosis is severe, you may have difficulty breathing, your brain may swell (cerebral edema), and there is a risk of coma and even death.

How is DKA diagnosed?

Laboratory tests, including blood and urine tests, are used to confirm a diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis. Urine dipstick tests for ketones are available for home use. Keep some nearby in case your blood sugar level becomes high.

How is it treated?

When ketoacidosis is severe, it must be treated in the hospital, often in an intensive care unit. Treatment involves giving insulin and fluids through a vein and closely monitoring certain chemicals in the blood (electrolytes). It can take several days for your blood sugar level and fluid status to return to a safe range.

Who is at risk for DKA?

If you have type 1 diabetes, you are at risk for DKA if you do not take enough insulin, have a severe infection or other illness, or become severely dehydrated. In some cases DKA can be the first sign of diabetes.

thanks. That sounds so scary. So really it could be from an infection or him becoming dehydrated...but who knows.

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