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Why won't it end. ( long and filled with techincal info- PIOG)

Posted by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 1:00 AM
  • 15 Replies

 Some say I am jumping the gun, but this has lead on for months and every sign says it and my gut says it and the doctor says it.

I go next wednesday to get the ultrasound and mamogram to confirm it. I get a biopsy after that. I go tomorrow for the 3rd opinion( other 2 agree)

This is my latest diagnosis....

For once I hope the doctors are wrong, wrong, wrong, but my gut tells me that their not. Every fiber of my being tells me I have it. ...

Paget's Disease of the Nipple

Key Points

  • Paget's disease of the nipple is an uncommon type of cancer that forms in or around the nipple and accounts for about 1% of all breast cancers.
  • Paget's disease of the nipple may be associated with an underlying breast cancer.
  • Scientists do not know what causes Paget's disease of the nipple, but two major theories have been suggested for how it develops: One is that it starts in the skin and the other theory is that it starts in the breast and spreads into the nipple.
  • Symptoms of early-stage disease may include redness or crusting of the nipple skin. Symptoms of more advanced disease often include tingling, itching, increased sensitivity, burning, or pain in the nipple.
  • Paget's disease of the nipple is diagnosed by performing a biopsy.
  • Mastectomy is the usual treatment for Paget's disease of the nipple. Additional treatments, such as radiation or chemotherapy, may be recommended under certain circumstances.

What Are the Symptoms of Paget’s Disease of the Nipple?

Symptoms of early Paget’s disease of the nipple include redness and mild scaling and flaking of the nipple skin. Early symptoms may cause only mild irritation and may not be enough to prompt a visit to the doctor. Improvement in the skin can occur spontaneously, but this should not be taken as a sign that the disease has disappeared. More advanced disease may show more serious destruction of the skin. At this stage, the symptoms may include tingling, itching, increased sensitivity, burning, and pain. There may also be discharge from the nipple, and the nipple can appear flattened against the breast.

In approximately half of patients with Paget’s disease of the nipple, a lump or mass in the breast can be felt during a physical exam. In most cases, Paget’s disease of the nipple is initially confined to the nipple, later spreading to the areola or other regions of the breast. The areola is the circular area of darker skin that surrounds the nipple. Paget’s disease of the nipple can also be found only on the areola, where it may resemble eczema, a noncancerous itchy red rash. Although rare, Paget’s disease of the nipple can occur in both breasts.

How Is Paget’s Disease of the Nipple Diagnosed?

If a health care provider suspects Paget’s disease of the nipple, a biopsy of the nipple skin is performed. In a biopsy, the doctor removes a small sample of tissue. A pathologist examines the tissue under a microscope to see if Paget cells are present. The pathologist may use a technique called immunohistochemistry (staining tissues to identify specific cells) to differentiate Paget cells from other cell types. A sample of nipple discharge may also be examined under a microscope for the presence of Paget cells.

Because most people with Paget’s disease of the nipple also have underlying breast cancer, a physical exam and mammography (X-ray of the breast) are used to make a complete diagnosis.

How Is Paget’s Disease of the Nipple Treated?

Surgery is the most common treatment for Paget’s disease of the nipple. The specific treatment often depends on the characteristics of the underlying breast cancer.

A modified radical mastectomy may be recommended when invasive cancer or extensive DCIS has been diagnosed. In this operation, the surgeon removes the breast, the lining over the chest muscles, and some of the lymph nodes under the arm. In cases where underlying breast cancer is not invasive, the surgeon may perform a simple mastectomy to remove only the breast and the lining over the chest muscles.

Alternatively, patients whose disease is confined to the nipple and the surrounding area may undergo breast-conserving surgery or lumpectomy followed by radiation therapy. During breast-conserving surgery, the surgeon removes the nipple, areola, and the entire portion of the breast believed to contain the cancer. In most cases, radiation therapy is also used to help prevent recurrence of the cancer.

During surgery, particularly modified radical mastectomy, the doctor may perform an axillary node dissection to remove the lymph nodes under the arm. The lymph nodes are then examined to see if the cancer has spread to them.

by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 1:00 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Jenn8604
by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 1:03 AM
hugs! i hope it isnt. i'll be praying for u.
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sherriemorgan
by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 1:12 AM

 Thanks

 

TexasWife
by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 1:54 AM

Hug. I hope they are wrong.

jaylinsmom1
by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 2:48 AM

 good luck keep us updated and sorry to hear this

HeartsLove
by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 3:19 AM
I'm praying for you. God has a plan, turn to Him, He will NEVER give you more than you can handle

sherriemorgan
by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 7:28 AM

 Thanks for the support ladies.

xxLukesMamaxx
by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 7:51 AM

Oh my gosh, I hope you don't have it! You are in my prayers! 

MissLoveLyfe
by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 7:57 AM

*hugs* I hope you don't have it!! I'll be praying for you!

lip.lock
by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 8:01 AM
I have eczema on mine that won't go away.. Or that's what the doctor says. I had no idea this existed :( I hope you don't have it mama!
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sherriemorgan
by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 8:19 AM

 

Quoting lip.lock:

I have eczema on mine that won't go away.. Or that's what the doctor says. I had no idea this existed :( I hope you don't have it mama!

 I hope so too, We thought originally it was my exzema, but it kept coming and going, and also my areola kept swelling. I know I will make it through it, but I just keep thinking" what if I don't"

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