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need info on corpus luteum cyst

Posted by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 12:54 PM
  • 11 Replies

Ok done a US and my last period was March 10th. I have had one of these before but it was with my second son so dont understand what syptoms come from them else wise. I am have pregnancy like syptoms and still no period. What all can the cyst do and will it interfere with me TTC. Thanks.

by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 12:54 PM
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Replies (1-10):
MommyIvy
by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 1:01 PM

I have no clue. Here is a bump for you!

kajira
by Emma on Apr. 13, 2011 at 1:06 PM

the corpeous lutues is what produces progesterone and will maintain a pregnancy if you concieve, it's a GOOD thing to have. it's a good sign that you ovulated, you just need to wait for it to disolve if you didn't concieve and you should start your period.

debra36701
by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 1:06 PM

BUMP!

debra36701
by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 1:07 PM

Yeah this has me lost cause i didnt think it would cost this much problem but who knows.

kajira
by Emma on Apr. 13, 2011 at 1:08 PM

Ovarian Cysts Overview

Ovarian cysts are small fluid-filled sacs that develop in a woman's ovaries. Most cysts are harmless, but some may cause problems such as rupturing, bleeding, or pain; and surgery may be required to remove the cyst(s). It is important to understand the function of the ovaries and how these cysts may form.

Women normally have two ovaries that store and release eggs. Each ovary is about the size of a walnut, and one ovary is located on each side of the uterus. One ovary produces one egg each month, and this process starts a woman's monthly menstrual cycle. The egg is enclosed in a sac called a follicle. An egg grows inside the ovary until estrogen (a hormone), signals the uterus to prepare itself for the egg. In turn, the lining of the uterus begins to thicken and prepare for implantation of a fertilized egg resulting in pregnancy. This cycle occurs each month and usually ends when the egg is not fertilized. All contents of the uterus are then expelled if the egg is not fertilized. This is called a menstrual period.

In an ultrasound image, ovarian cysts resemble bubbles. The cyst contains only fluid and is surrounded by a very thin wall. This kind of cyst is also called a functional cyst, or simple cyst. If a follicle fails to rupture and release the egg, the fluid remains and can form a cyst in the ovary. This usually affects one of the ovaries. Small cysts (smaller than one-half inch) may be present in a normal ovary while follicles are being formed.

Ovarian cysts affect women of all ages. The vast majority of ovarian cysts are considered functional (or physiologic). This means they occur normally and are not part of a disease process. Most ovarian cysts are benign, meaning they are not cancerous, and many disappear on their own in a matter of weeks without treatment. While cysts may be found in ovarian cancer, ovarian cysts typically represent a harmless (benign) condition or a normal process. Ovarian cysts occur most often during a woman's childbearing years.

The most common types of ovarian cysts are the following:

  • Follicular cyst: This type of simple cyst can form when ovulation does not occur or when a mature follicle involutes (collapses on itself). A follicular cyst  usually forms at the time of ovulation and can grow to about 2.3 inches in diameter. The rupture of this type of cyst can create sharp severe pain on the side of the ovary on which the cyst appears. This sharp pain (sometimes called mittelschmerz) occurs in the middle of the menstrual cycle, during ovulation. About one-fourth of women with this type of cyst experience pain. Usually, these cysts produce no symptoms and disappear by themselves within a few months.

  • Corpus luteum cyst: This type of functional ovarian cyst occurs after an egg has been released from a follicle. After this happens, the follicle becomes what is known as a corpus luteum. If a pregnancy doesn't occur, the corpus luteum usually breaks down and disappears. It may, however, fill with fluid or blood and persist on the ovary. Usually, this cyst is found on only one side and produces no symptoms.

  • Hemorrhagic cyst: This type of functional cyst occurs when bleeding occurs within a cyst. Symptoms such as abdominal pain on one side of the body may be present with this type of cyst.

  • Dermoid cyst: This is a type of benign tumor sometimes referred to as mature cystic teratoma. It is an abnormal cyst that usually affects younger women and may grow to 6 inches in diameter. A dermoid cyst can contain other types of growths of body tissues such as fat and occasionally bone, hair, and cartilage.

    • The ultrasound image of this cyst type can vary because of the spectrum of contents, but a CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can show the presence of fat and dense calcifications.

    • These cysts can become inflamed. They can also twist around (a condition known as ovarian torsion), compromising their blood supply and causing severe abdominal pain.
debra36701
by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 1:08 PM

Ok that helps thanks. He did a US but only took a  quick glimpse at my uterus and done a urine test Monday which was negative. The cyst is on my left ovary and is 3cm big.

debra36701
by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 1:10 PM

Thanks for the info that is great information and eases my mind on alot on things. Now just hoping the period come so i can get back on track.  I am on cycle day 34.

kajira
by Emma on Apr. 13, 2011 at 1:12 PM

a urine test isn't a very accurate way to test for early pregnancy...

i'm surprised your doctor did that.

only a quantative HGC test is accurate early - and then if there's a number higher than 5, they re-test with in 72 hours to see if it's changed, that's the most accurate way of testing for pregnancy early.

Quoting debra36701:

Ok that helps thanks. He did a US but only took a  quick glimpse at my uterus and done a urine test Monday which was negative. The cyst is on my left ovary and is 3cm big.


debra36701
by on Apr. 13, 2011 at 1:20 PM

Yeah he said after the US that he didnt need the blood test which i thought was weird because of him not really taking no more then a glimpse of my uterus and the fact that i wouldnt be far enough along to problay see anything.

kajira
by Emma on Apr. 13, 2011 at 1:26 PM

If your still with in your normal "cycle" range - then the urine test may not be enough to show up positive.

some doctors are lazy and don't want to order the blood test version.

You'd know for sure with a quantative HGC test.

the # says a lot and if its higher than 5, you ARE pregnant, but almost NO urine test will pick up an HGC lower then 25, and some as high as 100... or more. ^.^

it varies, even test to test of the same brand. some are more sensitive than others.


urine tests aren't nessecarily that accurate for early testing.


the HGC # is far more accurate.

Quoting debra36701:

Yeah he said after the US that he didnt need the blood test which i thought was weird because of him not really taking no more then a glimpse of my uterus and the fact that i wouldnt be far enough along to problay see anything.


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