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endometriosis, question for friend

Posted by on Jan. 6, 2015 at 1:35 AM
  • 11 Replies
My bff has endometriosis (I'm pretty ignorant about the condition). They've been ttc for a few years and she was recently diagnosed. She's still relatively clueless regarding ttc. I've attempted to educate her as best i can but I'm not an expert. I know enough for what I needed.

Does anyone have any advice or thoughts I could pass on to her?

TIA
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by on Jan. 6, 2015 at 1:35 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Khooks
by Jessica on Jan. 6, 2015 at 9:58 AM
Bump!
Luvmy2babies22
by Silver Member on Jan. 6, 2015 at 10:41 AM
Bump
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rockcrazyrebel
by Silver Member on Jan. 6, 2015 at 10:47 AM
Did she have any removed?
Luvmy2babies22
by Silver Member on Jan. 6, 2015 at 11:31 AM
No. She said the surgery is her last resort. She's seeing a naturopath...

Quoting rockcrazyrebel: Did she have any removed?
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Rogue95
by Maggie on Jan. 6, 2015 at 11:54 AM

Well, with endoemtriosis, it means that the tissue that would typically line the uterus and allow for implantation, also grows in other places.  From there, it will naturally react to your body's chemical makeup and cause heavier bleeding, pain, etc.  The problem with Endometriosis is that often times, the patches where is has grown will start to produce their own chemicals, which can lead to many deficiencies in hormones, and incredible difficulty getting pregnant.  It can even stop ovulation.  Because I have endometriosis in conjunction with severe PCOS, I have to have full hormone panels every 3 months.  I am on metformin, and it seems to have gotten my body back on track within the hormone spectrum, and has caused me to start ovulating again.  Really the only things you can do to manage it are to eat as healthy as possible, excercise, and try to maintain a healthy weight, although I would suggest a full hormone panel to assess any risks accompanied with the condition.  It is an uncurable condition, that can and will wreak havoc on the body and fertility

seaturtle1
by Melissa on Jan. 6, 2015 at 11:57 AM

I was going to suggest a naturopathic doctor.  They are really good at womans issues.  But it can take a couple of tries to find that right doctor for you.  I love my natural doc.  But it took me a while to find the right one.  I am new to all this myself.  Trying to learn all about the body and ovulation so I am no help.  But I wish your friend the best of luck.  

Quoting Luvmy2babies22: No. She said the surgery is her last resort. She's seeing a naturopath...
Quoting rockcrazyrebel: Did she have any removed?


Luvmy2babies22
by Silver Member on Jan. 6, 2015 at 1:21 PM
She has told me that her estrogen levels are thru the roof but that's all I know. She is also under the impression that if she's able to get pg and have a baby, the endometriosis will go away completely. She said the surgery gets rid of it for good as well. From being on here, I didn't think that was true but don't know enough to say anything.

Have you read Taking Charge of Your Fertility? I've heard good things but don't know if it would be helpful for her since she has the extra hurdle of the endometriosis (I don't know if the book touches on medical issues or not).

Thanks for all your help!


Quoting Rogue95:

Well, with endoemtriosis, it means that the tissue that would typically line the uterus and allow for implantation, also grows in other places.  From there, it will naturally react to your body's chemical makeup and cause heavier bleeding, pain, etc.  The problem with Endometriosis is that often times, the patches where is has grown will start to produce their own chemicals, which can lead to many deficiencies in hormones, and incredible difficulty getting pregnant.  It can even stop ovulation.  Because I have endometriosis in conjunction with severe PCOS, I have to have full hormone panels every 3 months.  I am on metformin, and it seems to have gotten my body back on track within the hormone spectrum, and has caused me to start ovulating again.  Really the only things you can do to manage it are to eat as healthy as possible, excercise, and try to maintain a healthy weight, although I would suggest a full hormone panel to assess any risks accompanied with the condition.  It is an uncurable condition, that can and will wreak havoc on the body and fertility

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Luvmy2babies22
by Silver Member on Jan. 6, 2015 at 1:22 PM
Thank you. Best of luck to you too!

Quoting seaturtle1:

I was going to suggest a naturopathic doctor.  They are really good at womans issues.  But it can take a couple of tries to find that right doctor for you.  I love my natural doc.  But it took me a while to find the right one.  I am new to all this myself.  Trying to learn all about the body and ovulation so I am no help.  But I wish your friend the best of luck.  

Quoting Luvmy2babies22: No. She said the surgery is her last resort. She's seeing a naturopath...

Quoting rockcrazyrebel: Did she have any removed?

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Rainstorm76
by Member on Jan. 6, 2015 at 2:08 PM
Have her use an enzyme called serrepeptase. Can get it off amazon. It eats up scar tissue and adhesions. And opens Fallopian tubes. I had stage 4 and my only remaining tube was blocked. I now have a 5 month old son after ttc for 2 years.
Rogue95
by Maggie on Jan. 6, 2015 at 11:54 PM

No I have not read it.  Having a baby will not make it go away completely.  It is a chronic disease, so it will come back, even if it is removed.  If she is not producing enough Progesterone, she will not be able to concieve. 

Quoting Luvmy2babies22: She has told me that her estrogen levels are thru the roof but that's all I know. She is also under the impression that if she's able to get pg and have a baby, the endometriosis will go away completely. She said the surgery gets rid of it for good as well. From being on here, I didn't think that was true but don't know enough to say anything. Have you read Taking Charge of Your Fertility? I've heard good things but don't know if it would be helpful for her since she has the extra hurdle of the endometriosis (I don't know if the book touches on medical issues or not). Thanks for all your help!
Quoting Rogue95:

Well, with endoemtriosis, it means that the tissue that would typically line the uterus and allow for implantation, also grows in other places.  From there, it will naturally react to your body's chemical makeup and cause heavier bleeding, pain, etc.  The problem with Endometriosis is that often times, the patches where is has grown will start to produce their own chemicals, which can lead to many deficiencies in hormones, and incredible difficulty getting pregnant.  It can even stop ovulation.  Because I have endometriosis in conjunction with severe PCOS, I have to have full hormone panels every 3 months.  I am on metformin, and it seems to have gotten my body back on track within the hormone spectrum, and has caused me to start ovulating again.  Really the only things you can do to manage it are to eat as healthy as possible, excercise, and try to maintain a healthy weight, although I would suggest a full hormone panel to assess any risks accompanied with the condition.  It is an uncurable condition, that can and will wreak havoc on the body and fertility


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