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Being Induced, Nervous.

Posted by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 12:21 PM
  • 18 Replies
I am currently 39w4d my due date is Saturday even though I'm 40w Friday. I have an appointment Thursday with my doctors to be reexamined and go over induction. I've been at fingertip dilated and 60% effaced for about 5 weeks. Id like her to come on her own but my docs induce if she's not here a few days after due date or if I'm showing no progress. I'm very nervous about induction not labor. Any experiences good or bad? I do plan on getting an epidural
by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 12:21 PM
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KylersMom8-16-7
by Platinum Member on Jul. 16, 2013 at 12:40 PM
Don't allow it! Your doctors work for YOU. If you don't want to be induced say so! Induction has it's own risks. A normal healthy pregnancy can last 42 weeks or more.

Some risks are:
1. Increased risk of abnormal fetal heart rate, shoulder dystocia and other problems with the baby in labor. Labor induction is done by intervening in the body's natural process, typically with powerful drugs to bring on contractions or devices that are used to break the water before labor starts. Both of these types of induction can cause the baby to react in a manner that is called fetal distress as seen by fetal monitoring.

The nature of induction like contractions may also be more forceful than natural labor. This can cause your baby to assume or stay in an unfavorable position for labor making labor longer and more painful for the mother. It can also increase the need for other interventions as well.

2. Increased risk of your baby being admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Babies who are born via induction have not yet sent signals to the mother to start labor. This means that they simply aren't yet ready to be born. This risk is worth it if the baby or mother's lives are in danger, but simply to take this risk for elective reasons may not be well advised.

When a baby is in the intensive care unit there is less ability for you to be with your baby or to hold your baby. Breastfeeding usually gets off to a rocky start as well. This can usually be avoided by giving birth when your body and baby say it is time.

3. Increased risk of forceps or vacuum extraction used for birth. When labor is induced babies tend to stay in unfavorable positions, the use of epidural anesthesia is increased and therefore the need to assist the baby's birth via the use of forceps and vacuum extraction is also increased.

4. Increased risk of cesarean section. Sometimes labor inductions don't take, but it's too late to send you home, the baby must be born. The most common cause of this is that the bags of waters has been broken, either naturally or via an amniotomy. Since the risk of infection is greater, your baby will need to be born via c-section.

A cesarean in an induced labor is also more likely for reasons of malpresentation (posterior, etc.) as well as fetal distress.

5. Increased risks to the baby of prematurity and jaundice. Induction can be done before your baby is ready to be born, because your due date is off or because your baby simply needed more time in the womb to grow and mature their lungs. Your baby may also be more likely to suffer from jaundice at or near birth because of the induction. This can lead to other medical treatments as well as stays in the hospital for your baby.

Being born even a week or two early can result in your baby being a near term or late preterm infant. This means that your baby is likely to have more trouble breathing, eating and maintaining temperature.
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Halls0206
by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 12:51 PM
Thank you for the info. I've heard women say it was fine but I've heard women who's baby ended up having brain damage. I think I'm going to wait it out I'm not wanting to chance anything
Halls0206
by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 1:33 PM
Is it better or bad to get my membranes swept by my doctor?


Quoting KylersMom8-16-7:

Don't allow it! Your doctors work for YOU. If you don't want to be induced say so! Induction has it's own risks. A normal healthy pregnancy can last 42 weeks or more.



Some risks are:

1. Increased risk of abnormal fetal heart rate, shoulder dystocia and other problems with the baby in labor. Labor induction is done by intervening in the body's natural process, typically with powerful drugs to bring on contractions or devices that are used to break the water before labor starts. Both of these types of induction can cause the baby to react in a manner that is called fetal distress as seen by fetal monitoring.



The nature of induction like contractions may also be more forceful than natural labor. This can cause your baby to assume or stay in an unfavorable position for labor making labor longer and more painful for the mother. It can also increase the need for other interventions as well.



2. Increased risk of your baby being admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Babies who are born via induction have not yet sent signals to the mother to start labor. This means that they simply aren't yet ready to be born. This risk is worth it if the baby or mother's lives are in danger, but simply to take this risk for elective reasons may not be well advised.



When a baby is in the intensive care unit there is less ability for you to be with your baby or to hold your baby. Breastfeeding usually gets off to a rocky start as well. This can usually be avoided by giving birth when your body and baby say it is time.



3. Increased risk of forceps or vacuum extraction used for birth. When labor is induced babies tend to stay in unfavorable positions, the use of epidural anesthesia is increased and therefore the need to assist the baby's birth via the use of forceps and vacuum extraction is also increased.



4. Increased risk of cesarean section. Sometimes labor inductions don't take, but it's too late to send you home, the baby must be born. The most common cause of this is that the bags of waters has been broken, either naturally or via an amniotomy. Since the risk of infection is greater, your baby will need to be born via c-section.



A cesarean in an induced labor is also more likely for reasons of malpresentation (posterior, etc.) as well as fetal distress.



5. Increased risks to the baby of prematurity and jaundice. Induction can be done before your baby is ready to be born, because your due date is off or because your baby simply needed more time in the womb to grow and mature their lungs. Your baby may also be more likely to suffer from jaundice at or near birth because of the induction. This can lead to other medical treatments as well as stays in the hospital for your baby.



Being born even a week or two early can result in your baby being a near term or late preterm infant. This means that your baby is likely to have more trouble breathing, eating and maintaining temperature.

LoveMyKBabies
by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 1:38 PM
I was induced with my first & the contractions were horrible. I ended up getting an epidural. With my second I went into labor naturally & it was so mild I didn't know I was in labor. The doctor checked me out at my appointment & told me I was dilated to 6 cm lol. I was completely drug free until I had room have a c-section. Based on my experiences, I'd suggest waiting & see if labor starts on it's own. Good luck with whatever you decide though, I hope you have a smooth delivery & you & baby are nice & healthy :)
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Halls0206
by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 1:44 PM
Thank you :) Is getting your membranes swept normal or is that like induction also?


Quoting LoveMyKBabies:

I was induced with my first & the contractions were horrible. I ended up getting an epidural. With my second I went into labor naturally & it was so mild I didn't know I was in labor. The doctor checked me out at my appointment & told me I was dilated to 6 cm lol. I was completely drug free until I had room have a c-section. Based on my experiences, I'd suggest waiting & see if labor starts on it's own. Good luck with whatever you decide though, I hope you have a smooth delivery & you & baby are nice & healthy :)

cemcnair
by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 2:22 PM
1 mom liked this
Just wait :) my doctors knew I didn't want an induction. They started getting antsy at 41 weeks both times. I waited. My boys were both born at 41w 1d, the perfect time for them, not my doctor.
cemcnair
by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 2:23 PM
You risk infection and they could accidentally break your water.

I know it's hard, but hang in there!!

42 weeks is normal for first time mommas.


Quoting Halls0206:

Is it better or bad to get my membranes swept by my doctor?




Quoting KylersMom8-16-7:

Don't allow it! Your doctors work for YOU. If you don't want to be induced say so! Induction has it's own risks. A normal healthy pregnancy can last 42 weeks or more.





Some risks are:


1. Increased risk of abnormal fetal heart rate, shoulder dystocia and other problems with the baby in labor. Labor induction is done by intervening in the body's natural process, typically with powerful drugs to bring on contractions or devices that are used to break the water before labor starts. Both of these types of induction can cause the baby to react in a manner that is called fetal distress as seen by fetal monitoring.





The nature of induction like contractions may also be more forceful than natural labor. This can cause your baby to assume or stay in an unfavorable position for labor making labor longer and more painful for the mother. It can also increase the need for other interventions as well.





2. Increased risk of your baby being admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Babies who are born via induction have not yet sent signals to the mother to start labor. This means that they simply aren't yet ready to be born. This risk is worth it if the baby or mother's lives are in danger, but simply to take this risk for elective reasons may not be well advised.





When a baby is in the intensive care unit there is less ability for you to be with your baby or to hold your baby. Breastfeeding usually gets off to a rocky start as well. This can usually be avoided by giving birth when your body and baby say it is time.





3. Increased risk of forceps or vacuum extraction used for birth. When labor is induced babies tend to stay in unfavorable positions, the use of epidural anesthesia is increased and therefore the need to assist the baby's birth via the use of forceps and vacuum extraction is also increased.





4. Increased risk of cesarean section. Sometimes labor inductions don't take, but it's too late to send you home, the baby must be born. The most common cause of this is that the bags of waters has been broken, either naturally or via an amniotomy. Since the risk of infection is greater, your baby will need to be born via c-section.





A cesarean in an induced labor is also more likely for reasons of malpresentation (posterior, etc.) as well as fetal distress.





5. Increased risks to the baby of prematurity and jaundice. Induction can be done before your baby is ready to be born, because your due date is off or because your baby simply needed more time in the womb to grow and mature their lungs. Your baby may also be more likely to suffer from jaundice at or near birth because of the induction. This can lead to other medical treatments as well as stays in the hospital for your baby.





Being born even a week or two early can result in your baby being a near term or late preterm infant. This means that your baby is likely to have more trouble breathing, eating and maintaining temperature.

proudmommy7663
by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 2:26 PM
It will be ok sweety, wait until you're ready I was 17 and 39 weeks and had to be induced due to my daughter not practicing breatHing, I was scared shitless but it's all going to be ok
Halls0206
by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 2:32 PM
Thank you all!
C.H.E.L.S.E.A
by Silver Member on Jul. 16, 2013 at 7:11 PM

 It bothers me when doctors want to induce for no reason, especially when you'd barely be past your due date. I'd personally skip the induction and wait for baby to come on her own. Doctors can't force you to do anything, so if you don't want an induction, don't do it.

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