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smoking and breastfeeding POIG

Posted by on Dec. 14, 2009 at 6:52 PM
  • 16 Replies

I had posted  in a different post regarding trying to start nursing again...my daughter is a month old. My new question is...I smoke about 3-5 cigs a day...is this going to affect us nursing?

by on Dec. 14, 2009 at 6:52 PM
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AandCsmomBrandy
by on Dec. 14, 2009 at 6:53 PM

no it will not affect milk production but it will expose your baby to niccotine and she will become addicted.

adalynnsmom
by on Dec. 14, 2009 at 7:15 PM

I nursed my daughter for 13 months (she is 34 months now, almost 3).  I smoked about that muc ha day when nursing her.  She is fine, she quite nursing fine.  Now I did not smoke while I was prego, and for aboout the first two months nursin her.  I had a really bad and DH left the smokes at home and I put her in her crib (she cried for like two hours I was at my wittsend.) and went outside and and had a smoke that was it I had started again.  Now the good news is I have been wuite for over a year now.  11 Days before I found out I was prego with DS.  Now I do not think it is the best for babies, but nursing is.  I hope I was able to help.

AutymsMommy
by Member on Dec. 14, 2009 at 7:18 PM

No it will not cause her child to become addicted.

Apparently this is an opinion that differs depending on whom you ask.

My pediatrician has told me that smoking is not a good enough reason to not breastfeed, because if you only smoke a few cigarettes a day then the amount of nicotine that your child receives is so little that it is undetectable.

Quoting AandCsmomBrandy:

no it will not affect milk production but it will expose your baby to niccotine and she will become addicted.


I am a Private School sending, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Homework Helping, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Academic pushing Mum. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it raising my child - I will do that, Thank You. I believe that a woman's place is in the home taking care of her house, children and husband. I am submissive and proud, my husband is head of my home. I am a proud, traditional Roman Catholic, as is my husband... Yes we are teaching our daughter that The Church is the only Church.               Aimee


aenima49
by on Dec. 14, 2009 at 9:57 PM

http://www.kellymom.com/health/lifestyle/smoking.html

 

Should a mother who smokes cigarettes breastfeed?

First of all, a mom who can't stop smoking should breastfeed. Breastfeeding provides many immunities that help your baby fight illness and can even help counteract some of the effects of cigarette smoke on your baby: for example, breastfeeding has been shown to decrease the negative effects of cigarette smoke on a baby's lungs. It's definitely better if breastfeeding moms not smoke, but if you can't stop or cut down, then it is better to smoke and breastfeed than to smoke and formula feed.

The more cigarettes that you smoke, the greater the health risks for you and your baby. If you can't stop smoking, or don't want to stop smoking, it's safer for your baby if you cut down on the number of cigarettes that you smoke.

 

What happens to babies when they are exposed to cigarette smoke?
  • Babies and children who are exposed to cigarette smoke have a much higher incidence of pneumonia, asthma, ear infections, bronchitis, sinus infections, eye irritation, and croup.
  • Colic occurs more often in babies whose mothers or fathers smoke or if a breastfeeding mother smokes. Researchers believe that not only does the nicotine transferred into mother's milk upset baby but the passive smoke in the home acts as an irritant. Babies of smoking parents fuss more, and mothers who smoke may be less able to cope with a colicky baby (due to lower levels of prolactin).
  • Heavy smoking by breastfeeding moms occasionally causes symptoms in the breastfeeding baby such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps and diarrhea.
  • Babies of smoking mothers and fathers have a seven times greater chance of dying from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).
  • Children of smoking parents have two to three times more visits to the doctor, usually from respiratory infections or allergy-related illnesses.
  • Children who are exposed to passive smoke in the home have lower blood levels of HDL, the good cholesterol that helps protect against coronary artery disease.
  • Children of smoking parents are more likely to become smokers themselves.
  • A recent study found that growing up in a home in which two parents smoked could double the child's risk of lung cancer later in life.

 

How does does smoking affect breastfeeding?

Smoking has been linked to:

  • Earlier weaning. One study showed that the heaviest smokers tend to wean the earliest.
  • Lower milk production
  • Interference with milk let-down
  • Lower levels of prolactin. The hormone prolactin must be present for milk synthesis to occur.
  • One study (Laurberg 2004) indicated that smoking mothers who live in areas of mild to moderate iodine deficiency have less iodine in their breastmilk (needed for baby's thyroid function) compared to nonsmoking mothers. The study authors suggested that breastfeeding mothers who smoke consider taking an iodine supplement.

Although smoking has been linked to milk production and let-down problems, this may be related to poor lactation management rather than physiological causes. Dr. Lisa Amir, in a review published in 2001, concluded that "Although there is consistent evidence that women who smoke breastfeed their infants for a shorter duration than non-smokers, the evidence for a physiological mechanism is not strong."

How to minimize the risk to your baby if you smoke
  • The ideal: Stop smoking altogether.
  • Cut down. The less you smoke, the smaller the chance that difficulties will arise. The risks increase if you smoke more than 20 cigarettes per day.
  • Don't smoke immediately before or during breastfeeding. It will inhibit let-down and is dangerous to your baby.
  • Smoke immediately after breastfeeding to cut down on the amount of nicotine in your milk during nursing. Wait as long as possible between smoking and nursing. It takes 95 minutes for half of the nicotine to be eliminated from your body.
  • Avoid smoking in the same room with your baby. Even better, smoke outside, away from your baby and other children. Don't allow anyone else to smoke near your baby.
Lennox07
by on Dec. 15, 2009 at 10:32 AM

Erm, don't think the baby will be addicted. Haha. Since you can't give up smoking then do your best to ensure baby doesn't inhale the smoke. I read somewhere, a babycare/motherhood website, that babies' body system in general cannot absorb nicotine, hence will pass it straight out with their waste. You could search for it, I can't remmeber exactly, perhaps babycentre? And yes, you could always wait at least 95 minutes before bf-ing. That is, if baby lets you. Haha..

And I really am so sick of seeing this kellymom link. Helpful, but. Just sooo sick of seeing it.

Quoting aenima49:

http://www.kellymom.com/health/lifestyle/smoking.html

 

Should a mother who smokes cigarettes breastfeed?

First of all, a mom who can't stop smoking should breastfeed. Breastfeeding provides many immunities that help your baby fight illness and can even help counteract some of the effects of cigarette smoke on your baby: for example, breastfeeding has been shown to decrease the negative effects of cigarette smoke on a baby's lungs. It's definitely better if breastfeeding moms not smoke, but if you can't stop or cut down, then it is better to smoke and breastfeed than to smoke and formula feed.

The more cigarettes that you smoke, the greater the health risks for you and your baby. If you can't stop smoking, or don't want to stop smoking, it's safer for your baby if you cut down on the number of cigarettes that you smoke.

 

What happens to babies when they are exposed to cigarette smoke?
  • Babies and children who are exposed to cigarette smoke have a much higher incidence of pneumonia, asthma, ear infections, bronchitis, sinus infections, eye irritation, and croup.
  • Colic occurs more often in babies whose mothers or fathers smoke or if a breastfeeding mother smokes. Researchers believe that not only does the nicotine transferred into mother's milk upset baby but the passive smoke in the home acts as an irritant. Babies of smoking parents fuss more, and mothers who smoke may be less able to cope with a colicky baby (due to lower levels of prolactin).
  • Heavy smoking by breastfeeding moms occasionally causes symptoms in the breastfeeding baby such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps and diarrhea.
  • Babies of smoking mothers and fathers have a seven times greater chance of dying from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).
  • Children of smoking parents have two to three times more visits to the doctor, usually from respiratory infections or allergy-related illnesses.
  • Children who are exposed to passive smoke in the home have lower blood levels of HDL, the good cholesterol that helps protect against coronary artery disease.
  • Children of smoking parents are more likely to become smokers themselves.
  • A recent study found that growing up in a home in which two parents smoked could double the child's risk of lung cancer later in life.

 

How does does smoking affect breastfeeding?

Smoking has been linked to:

  • Earlier weaning. One study showed that the heaviest smokers tend to wean the earliest.
  • Lower milk production
  • Interference with milk let-down
  • Lower levels of prolactin. The hormone prolactin must be present for milk synthesis to occur.
  • One study (Laurberg 2004) indicated that smoking mothers who live in areas of mild to moderate iodine deficiency have less iodine in their breastmilk (needed for baby's thyroid function) compared to nonsmoking mothers. The study authors suggested that breastfeeding mothers who smoke consider taking an iodine supplement.

Although smoking has been linked to milk production and let-down problems, this may be related to poor lactation management rather than physiological causes. Dr. Lisa Amir, in a review published in 2001, concluded that "Although there is consistent evidence that women who smoke breastfeed their infants for a shorter duration than non-smokers, the evidence for a physiological mechanism is not strong."

How to minimize the risk to your baby if you smoke
  • The ideal: Stop smoking altogether.
  • Cut down. The less you smoke, the smaller the chance that difficulties will arise. The risks increase if you smoke more than 20 cigarettes per day.
  • Don't smoke immediately before or during breastfeeding. It will inhibit let-down and is dangerous to your baby.
  • Smoke immediately after breastfeeding to cut down on the amount of nicotine in your milk during nursing. Wait as long as possible between smoking and nursing. It takes 95 minutes for half of the nicotine to be eliminated from your body.
  • Avoid smoking in the same room with your baby. Even better, smoke outside, away from your baby and other children. Don't allow anyone else to smoke near your baby.

I smoke as much as you do too, sometimes couple more. But Usually the "couple more" happens after he sleeps the longest stretch in the room.

Amy385
by on Dec. 15, 2009 at 11:28 AM

No bashing me im tryin 2 help another mama... i bash myself enough on this topic btw!!!

Quoting aenima49:

http://www.kellymom.com/health/lifestyle/smoking.html

 

Should a mother who smokes cigarettes breastfeed?

First of all, a mom who can't stop smoking should breastfeed. Breastfeeding provides many immunities that help your baby fight illness and can even help counteract some of the effects of cigarette smoke on your baby: for example, breastfeeding has been shown to decrease the negative effects of cigarette smoke on a baby's lungs. It's definitely better if breastfeeding moms not smoke, but if you can't stop or cut down, then it is better to smoke and breastfeed than to smoke and formula feed.

The more cigarettes that you smoke, the greater the health risks for you and your baby. If you can't stop smoking, or don't want to stop smoking, it's safer for your baby if you cut down on the number of cigarettes that you smoke.

 

What happens to babies when they are exposed to cigarette smoke?
  • Babies and children who are exposed to cigarette smoke have a much higher incidence of pneumonia, asthma, ear infections, bronchitis, sinus infections, eye irritation, and croup.

This is true.... i smoked cigs around my oldest son & hes had 2 tube surgeries! 11 ear infections in 17 months because my mom & i smoked in the house... we stopped when my 2nd was born & my middle son has had 1 ear infection!!! it also caused bryan 2 lose hearing in 1 ear!!!!!

  • Colic occurs more often in babies whose mothers or fathers smoke or if a breastfeeding mother smokes. Researchers believe that not only does the nicotine transferred into mother's milk upset baby but the passive smoke in the home acts as an irritant. Babies of smoking parents fuss more, and mothers who smoke may be less able to cope with a colicky baby (due to lower levels of prolactin).

I cant handle stress & i smoked while preg (shame on me!) and mason was extremely colic till i started smoking again, now hes a quiet happy baby... Nicotine withdrawl! my other 2 kids did not have withdrawls tho!!!

And i can cope with colic very well btw, i have no prob wit a fussy baby & never felt "overwhelmed" and i dont pass baby off either!!!

  • Heavy smoking by breastfeeding moms occasionally causes symptoms in the breastfeeding baby such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps and diarrhea.
  • Babies of smoking mothers and fathers have a seven times greater chance of dying from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).
  • Children of smoking parents have two to three times more visits to the doctor, usually from respiratory infections or allergy-related illnesses.

Kevin has asthma but we think its genetic (i have asthma too & my mama didnt smoke wit me)... my oldest doesnt have asthma & i smoked a great deal more with him!!!

  • Children who are exposed to passive smoke in the home have lower blood levels of HDL, the good cholesterol that helps protect against coronary artery disease.
  • Children of smoking parents are more likely to become smokers themselves.

my mom smoked but what got me smoking was peer pressure from a boyfriend, not cuz my mother did it

  • A recent study found that growing up in a home in which two parents smoked could double the child's risk of lung cancer later in life.

 

How does does smoking affect breastfeeding?

Smoking has been linked to:

  • Earlier weaning. One study showed that the heaviest smokers tend to wean the earliest.
  • Lower milk production

So far i have no had no probs with that

  • Interference with milk let-down

again no problems with this

  • Lower levels of prolactin. The hormone prolactin must be present for milk synthesis to occur.
  • One study (Laurberg 2004) indicated that smoking mothers who live in areas of mild to moderate iodine deficiency have less iodine in their breastmilk (needed for baby's thyroid function) compared to nonsmoking mothers. The study authors suggested that breastfeeding mothers who smoke consider taking an iodine supplement.

Although smoking has been linked to milk production and let-down problems, this may be related to poor lactation management rather than physiological causes. Dr. Lisa Amir, in a review published in 2001, concluded that "Although there is consistent evidence that women who smoke breastfeed their infants for a shorter duration than non-smokers, the evidence for a physiological mechanism is not strong."

How to minimize the risk to your baby if you smoke
  • The ideal: Stop smoking altogether.
  • Cut down. The less you smoke, the smaller the chance that difficulties will arise. The risks increase if you smoke more than 20 cigarettes per day.
  • Don't smoke immediately before or during breastfeeding. It will inhibit let-down and is dangerous to your baby.
  • Smoke immediately after breastfeeding to cut down on the amount of nicotine in your milk during nursing. Wait as long as possible between smoking and nursing. It takes 95 minutes for half of the nicotine to be eliminated from your body.
  • Avoid smoking in the same room with your baby. Even better, smoke outside, away from your baby and other children. Don't allow anyone else to smoke near your baby.

 

Im religious with the "no smoking" around my children... im worried about ear infections!!!



Bryan 5/29/03, Kevin 4/14/06, Mason 10/6/09

jessi19
by on Dec. 15, 2009 at 11:51 AM

I do smoke and bf, started again after of course not smoking while prego. I have NEVER smoked around my daughter

storkradio193
by on Dec. 15, 2009 at 11:53 AM

I would encourage you not to start again at all.  Good luck!

www.storkradio.com

Candi1024
by on Dec. 15, 2009 at 1:18 PM


Quoting storkradio193:

I would encourage you not to start again at all.  Good luck!


Encourage her not to start smoking again or bfing again? Even if you smoke, bfing is the best thing for your baby.

gdiamante
by Gina on Dec. 15, 2009 at 1:58 PM

You've been given great advice. I'll only add...do your damndest to get off and stay off the ciggie butts. Your family will love you all the more for it and will have you there to love that much longer!

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