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Question about pumping...

Posted by on Jul. 25, 2010 at 7:25 PM
  • 3 Replies

I am nursing my newborn and have been having some supply issues, which I am working on. Things do seem to be getting better with the fenugreek, oatmeal, and pumping when I can but my question is he is on the breast for most of the day, and I am pumping when he naps but that is maybe 2-4 times a day/night is this enough to stimulate more milk. And today I have only gotten 1/2 an oz the first time I pumped and just Under 1/2 an oz this time.

Thanks Ladies.

by on Jul. 25, 2010 at 7:25 PM
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Replies (1-3):
maggiemom2000
by on Jul. 25, 2010 at 8:09 PM

If you have got a newborn who can latch on and suck well then pumping is probably not the best way to increase your supply.  Instead, skin to skin contact, more frequent feeding, breast compression and switch nursing are going to work better.

Skin to skin: Get in bed with your baby, you w/o a shirt, baby in only a diaper and lay baby on your chest so you are tummy to tummy. Stay that way for as many days as you can! Even when the baby is not actually nursing, skin-to-skin is helpful. It increases mother's milk supply. It helps to "organize" the baby's behavior so that he learns to feed more easily. Skin-to-skin contact also keeps your baby warm and secure and helps him use all his energy to grow.

Frequent feeding: With baby on your chest you may get baby to feed a few times an hour

Breast compression: To do breast compression, put baby to your breast and let him latch on and nurse. You'll see the little fluttery sucks at first while he is waiting for the milk to let down, then his sucking will change to slooooow sucks and you'll be able to hear him swallowing. That's how you know your milk is flowing (also called "letting down"). 

When the milk stops flowing quickly, baby will go back to the quick, fluttery sucks. Then you grasp your breast, with your hand well back away from the nipple, and squeeeeeeze and hold. You'll see that baby goes back to the sloooow sucks again, as your milk begins flowing quickly and he drinks your milk. Keep holding the squeeze until he goes back to flutter-sucks, then release the squeeze for a few moments, and repeat. You can continue breast compression, followed by releasing the compression, for the whole nursing session. Doing breast compression can really help your baby get a lot more milk in a short time, and drain your breasts more completely to boost supply.

even when the baby is not actually nursing, skin-to-skin is helpful. It increases mother's milk supply. It helps to "organize" the baby's behavior so that he learns to feed more easily. Skin-to-skin contact also keeps your baby warm and secure and helps him use all his energy to grow.

Switch nursing: Another way to help baby get more milk is to switch breasts during the feeding so that baby takes both breasts 2 times during a feeding. Watch for baby to slow down, start to fall asleep then do the breast compression. When the breast compression is no longer getting them to eat more, switch to the other side. Keep switching back and forth like this until baby is completely full and your breasts are completely drained.

Then, when baby naps and goes for an hour or two w/o feeding, you take a nap, you need your rest!


tabi_cat1023
by Group Admin -Tabitha on Jul. 25, 2010 at 8:20 PM

ANY extra stimulation is great for supply, and when fully nursing getting anything is awesome

catholicmamamia
by on Jul. 26, 2010 at 12:20 AM

Yes, THIS.. baby is more effective than any breastpump! 

If you have got a newborn who can latch on and suck well then pumping is probably not the best way to increase your supply.  Instead, skin to skin contact, more frequent feeding, breast compression and switch nursing are going to work better.

Skin to skin: Get in bed with your baby, you w/o a shirt, baby in only a diaper and lay baby on your chest so you are tummy to tummy. Stay that way for as many days as you can! Even when the baby is not actually nursing, skin-to-skin is helpful. It increases mother's milk supply. It helps to "organize" the baby's behavior so that he learns to feed more easily. Skin-to-skin contact also keeps your baby warm and secure and helps him use all his energy to grow.

Frequent feeding: With baby on your chest you may get baby to feed a few times an hour

Breast compression: To do breast compression, put baby to your breast and let him latch on and nurse. You'll see the little fluttery sucks at first while he is waiting for the milk to let down, then his sucking will change to slooooow sucks and you'll be able to hear him swallowing. That's how you know your milk is flowing (also called "letting down"). 

When the milk stops flowing quickly, baby will go back to the quick, fluttery sucks. Then you grasp your breast, with your hand well back away from the nipple, and squeeeeeeze and hold. You'll see that baby goes back to the sloooow sucks again, as your milk begins flowing quickly and he drinks your milk. Keep holding the squeeze until he goes back to flutter-sucks, then release the squeeze for a few moments, and repeat. You can continue breast compression, followed by releasing the compression, for the whole nursing session. Doing breast compression can really help your baby get a lot more milk in a short time, and drain your breasts more completely to boost supply.

even when the baby is not actually nursing, skin-to-skin is helpful. It increases mother's milk supply. It helps to "organize" the baby's behavior so that he learns to feed more easily. Skin-to-skin contact also keeps your baby warm and secure and helps him use all his energy to grow.

Switch nursing: Another way to help baby get more milk is to switch breasts during the feeding so that baby takes both breasts 2 times during a feeding. Watch for baby to slow down, start to fall asleep then do the breast compression. When the breast compression is no longer getting them to eat more, switch to the other side. Keep switching back and forth like this until baby is completely full and your breasts are completely drained.

Then, when baby naps and goes for an hour or two w/o feeding, you take a nap, you need your rest!

 breastfeeding.jpg breastfeeding image by evemarcelo 

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