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How often must a toddler nurse to avoid supplements?

Posted by on Feb. 9, 2011 at 11:08 AM
  • 11 Replies

 My LO is 15 mos and nurses 3-4 times a day but most often it is 3. . .never less than that. I do not offer supplemental milk. She gets solids, snacks and water. She does get a yogurt drink (4oz) of some type with breakfast. I'm asking here b/c I saw another post where someone said the minimum for toddler nursing was 4-5 times a day to avoid supplements. I was under the impression the minimum was 3. My LO only nursed 5X a day from the time she was 6 mos old, then dropped to 4 at around 13 mos and to 3-4 shortly after that. Can someone clarify or give me a resource to check? Thank you.

by on Feb. 9, 2011 at 11:08 AM
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Replies (1-10):
jeng1980
by on Feb. 9, 2011 at 11:35 AM

It sounds like she is nursing enough to me.  I didn't know there was a minimum and I also didn't know there were "supplements" for toddlers.  My daughter nursed to 23 months and between 18-23 months she didn't really nurse a whole lot.  Giving you a bump for someone to chime in with bvetter info than I just gave you. :P

gdiamante
by Gina on Feb. 9, 2011 at 11:37 AM

I've never heard of a minimum before. You're DANDY. No supplements needed.

081499
by on Feb. 9, 2011 at 11:39 AM

That may have been me - oops.  I was mistaken.  *sheepish grin*

Kellymom.com says - There is no need to add cow's milk to your toddler's diet (or the equivalent nutrients from other milks or foods) as long as your baby is nursing at least 3-4 times per day. 

For some reason I read it at 4-5.  Stupid brain.  :)  Sounds like you and your little one are fine. 

mombloggerJ
by on Feb. 9, 2011 at 11:40 AM

 Thanks, guys. I tend to go from feeling very confident in what I'm doing, to "wait, have I been doing it all wrong?" lol. My first time nursing this long. . .first DD weaned at 13 mos on her own (though looking back I definitely pushed her in that direction without realizing it). My goal this time is at least 2. Glad to hear what we're doing is okay! =)

mombloggerJ
by on Feb. 9, 2011 at 11:41 AM

 

Quoting 081499:

That may have been me - oops.  I was mistaken.  *sheepish grin*

Kellymom.com says - There is no need to add cow's milk to your toddler's diet (or the equivalent nutrients from other milks or foods) as long as your baby is nursing at least 3-4 times per day. 

For some reason I read it at 4-5.  Stupid brain.  :)  Sounds like you and your little one are fine. 

 LOL. No biggie. I'm a little paranoid about doing this "right." ;-)

SoniaL
by on Feb. 9, 2011 at 11:42 AM

I think she is nursing plenty. We do not actually NEED milk so even if it is only 2 times a day (or not at all) no cows milk is needed. :)

maggiemom2000
by on Feb. 9, 2011 at 11:13 PM

You're fine!

From kellymom.com:

Cow's milk?

Many nursing moms are told that they must introduce cow's milk at a year. Your nursing toddler is already getting the best milk he can get - mother's milk! Breastmilk has a higher fat content than whole cow's milk (needed for baby's brain growth), and all the nutrients of human milk are significantly more bioavailable than those of cow's milk because it is species specific (not to mention all the components of mother's milk that are not present in cow's milk).

There is no need to add cow's milk to your toddler's diet (or the equivalent nutrients from other milks or foods) as long as your baby is nursing at least 3-4 times per day. Cow's milk is really just a convenient source of calcium, protein, fats, vitamin D, etc. - it's not required. There are many people in many parts of the world who do not drink milk and still manage to get all the calcium, protein, fats, vitamin D, etc. that they need.

  • Good non-dairy sources of protein include meats, fish, peas & beans (chick peas, lentils, baked beans, etc.), tofu and other soy products, boiled eggs, peanut and other nut butters (if your child is not allergic).
  • Good non-dairy sources of fats include soy and safflower oils, flax seed and flax seed oil, walnuts, fish and fish oils, avocado. Adding fats to cooking and baking can work well, for example, stir fry in safflower oil or make mini-muffins with soy or rice milk, oil or butter, and eggs.
  • Calcium may be derived from many nondairy sources.
  • Vitamin D can be supplied by sunlight exposure and food sources.
  • If your child is not nursing regularly and is not allergic to cow's milk products, but simply doesn't like cow's milk, you can incorporate milk into your child's diet in other ways. Many children like cheese, whole-fat yogurt or ice cream. You can also put milk into various food products: pancakes, waffles, muffins, French toast, scrambled eggs, mashed potatoes, and baked goods.
  • Some moms wish to offer cow's milk to their toddler, but baby doesn't like it. Over the age of 12 months, milk becomes a more minor part of a child's diet. It is sometimes helpful to mix increasing amounts of cow's milk with your expressed milk to help baby get used to the taste. Many dietitians see nothing wrong with adding some flavor (such as strawberry or chocolate) to cow's milk.

Pediatricians now recommend that any cow's milk be whole milk from a cup after the first year and until the child is at least 2 years of age. This ensures that your child receives enough fat, which is essential to proper brain development. After the age of two, if growth is good, you can switch to low-fat or nonfat milk. Note: If your child is nursing, then remember that mom's milk is "whole" milk - the more breastmilk your child gets, the less need to worry about your child getting additional fat from whole milk or other sources.

It's best to limit the amount of cow's milk that your child receives to 2-3 cups (16-24 ounces) per day, since too much cow's milk in a child's diet can put him at risk for iron-deficiency anemia (because milk can interfere with the absorption of iron) and may decrease the child's desire for other foods.

catholicmamamia
by on Feb. 10, 2011 at 12:56 AM

Cow's milk is not needed, at all. You are doing GREAT! 


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Hottubgodess
by on Feb. 10, 2011 at 11:57 AM

The best way to check if your LO is getting enough fluids is check his/her urine - is it dark yellow or orange?  Then no.  Nurse more.  If it is clear to light yellow, he/she is fine.  :)

COWS MILK SUPPLIMENTS ARE NOT NEEDED IN A TODDLER!!!!!!!!  Cows milk is for baby cows.  End of story. :)

Medications and Mother's Milk - Group Owner  


Are you tired of BAD Breastfeeding information?  Go to www.llli.org and search the resources for REAL CORRECT info. 


I yam what I yam and that's all that I yam ...... Thank you Popeye!   BEHOLD!  THE POWER OF BREASTMILK!!!   Proud momma of two self weaning, extended breastfed preemie boys!

Hottubgodess
by on Feb. 10, 2011 at 11:59 AM


Quoting mombloggerJ:

 Thanks, guys. I tend to go from feeling very confident in what I'm doing, to "wait, have I been doing it all wrong?" lol.


That is the sign of a good mom.......:)  Pat yourself on the back and follow your gut...always!

Medications and Mother's Milk - Group Owner  


Are you tired of BAD Breastfeeding information?  Go to www.llli.org and search the resources for REAL CORRECT info. 


I yam what I yam and that's all that I yam ...... Thank you Popeye!   BEHOLD!  THE POWER OF BREASTMILK!!!   Proud momma of two self weaning, extended breastfed preemie boys!

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