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help!

Posted by on Feb. 20, 2011 at 3:09 PM
  • 3 Replies
Is it possible to get back a full supply after ur milk supply has decreased drasticly.......and if so how do u do it? I have been supplementing and my supply has decreased....I want to go fully back to nursing...I can't do away with bottles completely because of school 3 nights a week
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by on Feb. 20, 2011 at 3:09 PM
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bittersweet7791
by on Feb. 20, 2011 at 3:28 PM
Mine dropped last month with all the stress i had going on i took fenegreek and drank lots of water and just nursed constently
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maggiemom2000
by on Feb. 20, 2011 at 3:30 PM

Gradually cut back on the supplements and increase the time at the breast. Yes, it is possible to get your supply back!

 

Kellymom has a great FAQWeaning From Formula Supplements:

 

Put baby to breast often

Aim for 10 breastfeeding sessons per day. If baby is not breastfeeding well, work with your lactation consultant.

Method for weaning from supplements

Do not drop supplements suddenly – this should be a gradual process.

  1. Prepare: Talk to baby’s health care provider and get his/her input. Record supplement amounts for a few days to determine how much supplement baby is getting per day. Use expressed milk for supplements if available. If you don’t have enough expressed milk, add banked milk or formula.
  2. Days 1-3: Take the current supplement amount (#1) and reduce by 1 oz (30 mL). Note that you’re not reducing 1 oz at every feeding, but 1 oz over the entire day. Monitor baby’s wet & dirty diapers. If diaper count is good, then do not exceed this amount of supplement each day – keep putting baby back to the breast if he wants to eat more.
  3. Days 4-6: Take the current supplement amount (#2) and reduce by 1 oz (30 mL). Monitor baby’s wet & dirty diapers. If diaper count is good, then do not exceed this amount of supplement each day – keep putting baby back to the breast if he wants to eat more.
  4. Days 7-9: Take the current supplement amount (#3) and reduce by 1-2 oz (30-60 mL) – try 2 oz if things are going well. Monitor baby’s wet & dirty diapers. If diaper count is good, then do not exceed this amount of supplement each day – keep putting baby back to the breast if he wants to eat more.
  5. Continue the above method, slowly reducing the amount of supplement every 2-3 days as long as baby’s diaper count and weight gain indicate that he’s getting enough milk. Once you get to the point that the supplements are only expressed milk (no formula), then you can usually proceed at a faster pace--at this point you are making enough milk for baby and just need to transition baby to getting milk only at the breast (when not separated from mom).
  6. If baby’s weight gain or diaper count are borderline or inappropriate, then spend several more days at the same supplement level, or return to the previous supplement level and proceed at a slower pace.
  7. Monitor baby’s growth. Weigh baby at least once a week to ensure that he is gaining appropriately. Get another weight check a week after baby is completely back to the breast, to reassure yourself that things are going well. Keep in touch with baby’s health care provider throughout this process.

Pump to increase supply

  • Pumping will help you to increase supply faster, plus you will be able to use your milk instead of formula for any needed supplements. Your aim in pumping is to remove more milk from the breasts and/or to empty the breasts more often. The more milk you remove, the more milk you will produce.
  • A hospital-grade double pump will save time and maximize your pumping efforts.
  • Until supply is well established, it is important to get at least eight good nursing and/or pumping sessions per 24 hours. Ten sessions per day is better.
  • If baby does not breastfeed at a feeding, pump for 20-30 minutes, or for 2-5 minutes after the last drops of milk. If baby breastfeeds, but does not soften the breast well, pump for 10-15 minutes after nursing. If baby softens the breast well, then adding pumping sessions between breastfeeding sessions is most helpful.
  • Empty the breast as thoroughly as possible at each session. To ensure that the pump removes an optimum amount of milk from the breast, keep pumping for 2-5 minutes after the last drops of milk. Use breast massage prior to pumping, and massage and compressions during pumping to better empty the breasts and increase pumping output.
gdiamante
by Gina on Feb. 20, 2011 at 3:40 PM

Of course it is. No supplementing when you're home, MINIMAL when you're at school (one ounce to 1.25 ounces  per hour, no more). The idea is that baby "attacks" when you're home because he's so hungry. No, it won't hurt him to do that. Might not make him HAPPY if he's used to getting more... but that's the same kind of "unhappy" that will happen when you tell him he can only have ONE piece of candy and not two.

Remember that the ONLY true indication of a supply drop is the number of dipes you change. With supplementing it's hard to tell. It's normal to pump less over time, and normal pump output is as low as half an ounce altogether. Normal max is two ounces a session. Again, baby needs 1 ounce per hour... 1.25 ounces tops

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