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drinking & breastfeeding

Posted by on May. 18, 2011 at 9:14 PM
  • 36 Replies
ok I know people say if ur sober enough to drive ur sober enough to nurse.. don't no how much of that's true but that's wht I keep hearing but what if I had a few drinks and got a little tipsy? it's my 21st bday and bachelorette party all in 1 night and I obviously want to have 2 or 3 drinks.. maybe 4. not get sloppy drunk but just a nice buzz. I haven't drank @ ALL since I got pregnant! my daughter is 9 months old so would it be ok if I did this? will my milk dry up? and how long would I have to wait to nurse her after I'm done! say if I started drinking at 630 pm and had 4 drinks and then came home around midnight would I be able to nurse or how long would I have to wait?

please no bashing me for wanting to drink!
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by on May. 18, 2011 at 9:14 PM
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eeyorerdl
by on May. 18, 2011 at 9:25 PM

You may want to pump a few bottles for her before you go out.  And when you get back, do a few "pump and dumps".

RaLeighsMommy11
by on May. 18, 2011 at 9:26 PM
how many for after?

Quoting eeyorerdl:

You may want to pump a few bottles for her before you go out.  And when you get back, do a few "pump and dumps".

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eeyorerdl
by on May. 18, 2011 at 9:29 PM

I'm not too sure, I would say 2 or 3 for each breast.  i haven't looked much into it, yet, but this is what I plan on doing.  My baby's due August 5 and SO and I have birthdays in September...(I plan on having a few! big smile mini)

 

eeyorerdl
by on May. 18, 2011 at 9:32 PM

Found this on babycenter.com...hope it helps!  Looks like if you wait about 90 minutes per drink, you should be good to go...but I'd still pump and dump a couple times just to be sure!

<<Will it harm my breastfeeding baby if I drink wine, beer, or spirits?

It could if you don't take precautions. The same amount of alcohol that makes it into your bloodstream makes it into your breast milk. While the amount that's transferred if you drink a glass of wine is relatively small, your baby is tiny and has an immature liver, which means he or she can't process the alcohol as well as you can.

Studies show that alcohol can affect babies' eating and sleeping. During the four hours after a breastfeeding mother consumes an alcoholic beverage – such as 4 ounces of wine, one mixed drink, or one can of beer – babies who nurse consume about 23 percent less milk. And while breastfed babies may become drowsy and fall asleep more quickly after their mother drinks alcohol, they also sleep for a shorter amount of time.

Alcohol in breast milk may also hinder babies' development. In a landmark study of 400 infants published in The New England Journal of Medicine in 1989, gross motor development at 1 year of age lagged in breastfeeding babies whose mothers drank at least one drink daily during the infant's first three months of life. (The results of this study have not been duplicated, however.)

How can I safely have an occasional drink?

Wait at least two to three hours after you finish a drink before nursing your baby to give the alcohol a chance to be cleared from your body.

Your blood alcohol levels (and the level of alcohol in your milk) will generally be highest 30 to 90 minutes after you have a drink, although that time – and the length of time it takes the alcohol to leave your body – varies from person to person.

You can time your drink so that your baby won't be nursing for a few hours afterwards by having it right after a feeding, for example, or during one of your baby's longer stretches of sleep. Another option would be for you to bottle-feed your baby either previously expressed breast milk or formula in the hours following your alcohol consumption.

Alcohol isn't stored in breast milk, so "pumping and dumping" (using a breast pump to empty your breasts and then throwing out the collected milk) serves no purpose.

To ward off dehydration, be sure to down a glass of water in addition to the alcoholic drink. It's also a good idea to eat beforehand or when you're having your drink, as this will help lower the amount of alcohol in your blood and your milk.

Can I have more than one drink?

Having more than one drink is more difficult to do safely when you're a breastfeeding mom. The more drinks you have, the longer it takes for the alcohol to clear your system.

For example, according to researchers who have charted the clearance of alcohol from breast milk, for a 120-pound woman of average height who consumes three drinks in one hour, it will take seven and a half hours for her breast milk to be alcohol free. (For a 175-pound woman of average height, it would take about six hours.) If a 140-pound woman had four drinks in an hour, it would take about nine hours for her breast milk to be alcohol free, and for the 175-pound woman, it would take about eight hours.

If your baby sleeps through the night without waking up to nurse, having more than one drink in the evening is a possibility. But this may not be wise, for reasons that are important whether you're breastfeeding or not:

  • You can't safely care for your baby if you're intoxicated, so limit your drinking accordingly.
  • You can't safely co-sleep with your baby if you're under the influence of alcohol or other drugs. These intoxicants could interfere with your awareness of your baby's presence and your baby's cries. So if you do drink, keep your baby out of your bed.

Will drinking beer increase my milk supply?

No. There's no scientific evidence to support the popular wisdom that drinking beer – or any other alcohol – will boost your milk supply. In fact, drinking alcohol disrupts the hormones that are involved in milk production.

Julie Mennella, a researcher at the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia who studies alcohol's affect on lactation, explains that while prolactin (a hormone that aids milk production) increases with alcohol consumption, oxytocin (a hormone that's responsible for milk letdown) decreases. Researchers think this may explain why babies have a harder time breastfeeding when their mothers drink alcohol.

If you're concerned about a low milk supply, be sure to talk to a lactation consultant and your baby's healthcare practitioner.>>

eeyorerdl
by on May. 18, 2011 at 9:35 PM
Sorry, I read it wrong...about 2 hours per drink...
kajira
by Silver Member on May. 18, 2011 at 9:36 PM

pumping and dumping is "outdated" information.

If its been a couple hours since your last drink and your fairly sober - your milk will be fine.

Quoting eeyorerdl:

You may want to pump a few bottles for her before you go out.  And when you get back, do a few "pump and dumps".


mollysmom328
by on May. 18, 2011 at 9:39 PM
Char07
by on May. 18, 2011 at 9:44 PM
Yes, I would go by how you feel, if you get home at 12 and feel fine nurse, otherwise either wait or "pump and dump" for your comfort only! The only reason to pump and dump is to relieve engorgement and/or keep up supply :-)



Quoting kajira:

pumping and dumping is "outdated" information.

If its been a couple hours since your last drink and your fairly sober - your milk will be fine.


Quoting eeyorerdl:

You may want to pump a few bottles for her before you go out.  And when you get back, do a few "pump and dumps".


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RaLeighsMommy11
by on May. 18, 2011 at 9:48 PM
I'm SOOO afraid that having a few drinks will dry my milk up :(
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blondie.mom
by on May. 18, 2011 at 9:50 PM
Pump and dump is only to relieve engorgement, you do not need to P&D to "get the alcohol out". As the alcohol metabolizes out of your blood, it also goes out of your milk.
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