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WIC keeps telling me she's low in iron

Posted by on Jun. 4, 2011 at 12:17 AM
  • 19 Replies

6 months ago she was 12 months old and they told me her iron was low. Her dr. also checked it at that time and said she was fine. 3 months ago WIC checked it and it had come up some. We just went in 2 days ago and they said it was lower than the 12 month check. They also told me it's probably because brestmilk is low in iron. What do I do?

by on Jun. 4, 2011 at 12:17 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Daynaof3
by on Jun. 4, 2011 at 12:22 AM

 First, you have to have a nutrition risk in order to be eligible for WIC so hers is her iron level. Second, just like with lead testing, finger sticks for iron levels are notoriously unreliable. Third, you don't have to agree with the counseling they give at the appointment. If the doctor is not concerned and her levels there are coming out just fine then you don't need to worry over it.

jmercado823
by on Jun. 4, 2011 at 12:48 AM

My son also went through the same thing. Wic kept telling me he was low in iron. I continued to breastfeed him and make sure I fed him foods rich in iron. I gave him lots of spinach hidden in his foods and pureed meats since he hated the texture of it. I also gave DS trivisol w/ iron by Enfamil which is a vitamin for breastfed infants and infants who consume less than 18 oz of formula a day. Afterward, I switched to polyvisol which is for older babies and toddlers who are consuming solids. With the vitamins I was sure baby was getting vitamin D and iron he may have been lacking. After 6 months a breastfed baby needs to eat solids that are rich in iron because the iron in the breast milk is not enough for babies. My lactation consultant and pediatrician both told me that breastfed babies need to get vitamin supplements to ensure that they get their vitamin D. If your doc told you she is fine then don't worry about it. What you could do at this point is of course keep breastfeeding and make sure you incorporate iron-rich foods into her diet as well. Spinach, legumes, meat (lean red meat especially), dark leafy greens, eggs. If she likes cereals look for ones that have 100% iron on the nutrition facts list on the side of the box. Cheerios multi-grain cereal has 100% iron. I've even told the WIC they should allow this cereal since it has 100% iron also the banana nut crunch cereal by post.  When you give her foods high in iron wait at least an hour after before you give her dairy foods or foods high in calcium since calcium can inhibit the absorption of iron in the body. Wait an hour after giving her calcium rich foods before giving her iron rich foods. If you recall on the labels of iron rich prenatals they tell you not to drink the vitamin with milk. When you do give her iron rich foods follow it with foods rich in vitamin C to aid in the absorption of the iron. Keep up the good work mama. No worries!

raven1114
by on Jun. 4, 2011 at 1:09 AM

if his docotor isn't concerned i wouldn't worry about it.

bentleysmommy11
by on Jun. 4, 2011 at 1:17 AM

You don't have to have a nutrition risk to be eligible for WIC. You have to have a low(er) income to be eligible. 

Quoting Daynaof3:

 First, you have to have a nutrition risk in order to be eligible for WIC so hers is her iron level. Second, just like with lead testing, finger sticks for iron levels are notoriously unreliable. Third, you don't have to agree with the counseling they give at the appointment. If the doctor is not concerned and her levels there are coming out just fine then you don't need to worry over it.


Daynaof3
by on Jun. 4, 2011 at 1:27 AM

 You have to meet a nutrition risk, income guidelines, categorical requirements and residential requirements to be eligible for WIC. I work for WIC.

Quoting bentleysmommy11:

You don't have to have a nutrition risk to be eligible for WIC. You have to have a low(er) income to be eligible. 

Quoting Daynaof3:

 First, you have to have a nutrition risk in order to be eligible for WIC so hers is her iron level. Second, just like with lead testing, finger sticks for iron levels are notoriously unreliable. Third, you don't have to agree with the counseling they give at the appointment. If the doctor is not concerned and her levels there are coming out just fine then you don't need to worry over it.

 

 

shortycmlb
by on Jun. 4, 2011 at 1:32 AM

You DO have to be a 'Nutritional Risk' whether its overweight, underweight, inadequate diet or some other problem. They will sometimes 'make up' an excuse for you to stay on it just so you dont lose it even if your not a REAL nutritional risk. (Im a peer counselor) And it just depends on whether or not they 'tell' you the excuse their using to keep you on it. I dont have to worry, im fat lol. And dd2 is 'low weight' even by her docs standards and they have dd1 down as slightly overweight even though shes in the 70th percentile and the lady said 'dont worry about it'

Daynaof3
by on Jun. 4, 2011 at 1:35 AM

 

Quoting shortycmlb:

You DO have to be a 'Nutritional Risk' whether its overweight, underweight, inadequate diet or some other problem. They will sometimes 'make up' an excuse for you to stay on it just so you dont lose it even if your not a REAL nutritional risk. (Im a peer counselor) And it just depends on whether or not they 'tell' you the excuse their using to keep you on it. I dont have to worry, im fat lol. And dd2 is 'low weight' even by her docs standards and they have dd1 down as slightly overweight even though shes in the 70th percentile and the lady said 'dont worry about it'

 I am also a peer. I have a group for us if you would like to join, link in my siggy to the group. =)

lifetimelove
by on Jun. 4, 2011 at 6:06 AM

Breastfed infants do NOT need extra iron as a rule.  Breastmilk is only "low" in iron compared to iron fortified formula and babyfoods.  Why?  Because they have to pack a ton of iron in those foods because very little is absorbed.  Whereas the majority of the iron in breastmilk is absorbed.

My two older children had very little to no solid foods in their first year.  No vitamin supplements.  No cereals at all.  No formula.  I made no effort to give them high-iron foods.  They were breastfed on demand, at least every 3 hours during the day.  My daughter actually has a metabolic condition that makes her even higher risk for anemia.  Yet NEITHER one had low iron, in fact they both had PERFECT iron levels, much to the shock of the doctors. 

Unless a breastfed baby is showing signs of anemia, then iron supplements, whether vitamin or food, are very likely unnecessary, and quite possibly dangerous to optimal health.

That being said, there's absolutely no harm in giving an older infant (over six months) iron rich foods to make sure.  But giving the vitamins or iron ENRICHED foods might actually be counter-productive.

Quoting jmercado823:

My son also went through the same thing. Wic kept telling me he was low in iron. I continued to breastfeed him and make sure I fed him foods rich in iron. I gave him lots of spinach hidden in his foods and pureed meats since he hated the texture of it. I also gave DS trivisol w/ iron by Enfamil which is a vitamin for breastfed infants and infants who consume less than 18 oz of formula a day. Afterward, I switched to polyvisol which is for older babies and toddlers who are consuming solids. With the vitamins I was sure baby was getting vitamin D and iron he may have been lacking. After 6 months a breastfed baby needs to eat solids that are rich in iron because the iron in the breast milk is not enough for babies. My lactation consultant and pediatrician both told me that breastfed babies need to get vitamin supplements to ensure that they get their vitamin D. If your doc told you she is fine then don't worry about it. What you could do at this point is of course keep breastfeeding and make sure you incorporate iron-rich foods into her diet as well. Spinach, legumes, meat (lean red meat especially), dark leafy greens, eggs. If she likes cereals look for ones that have 100% iron on the nutrition facts list on the side of the box. Cheerios multi-grain cereal has 100% iron. I've even told the WIC they should allow this cereal since it has 100% iron also the banana nut crunch cereal by post.  When you give her foods high in iron wait at least an hour after before you give her dairy foods or foods high in calcium since calcium can inhibit the absorption of iron in the body. Wait an hour after giving her calcium rich foods before giving her iron rich foods. If you recall on the labels of iron rich prenatals they tell you not to drink the vitamin with milk. When you do give her iron rich foods follow it with foods rich in vitamin C to aid in the absorption of the iron. Keep up the good work mama. No worries!


Have a child with special needs?  Don't have a diagnosis?  Come join other moms of special needs children without a diagnosis at my group:


www.cafemom.com/group/undiagnosed


 


Christina807
by on Jun. 4, 2011 at 7:26 AM



Quoting raven1114:

if his docotor isn't concerned i wouldn't worry about it.


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tabi_cat1023
by Group Admin -Tabitha on Jun. 4, 2011 at 9:55 AM

THIS IS NOT TRUE!!!! This is crap to9ld to moms by formula companies by WIC sometimes and by doctors,,,its NOT true and in fact can CAUSE anemia and other nutrient deficiencies...the synthetic iron bonds with the natural iron in breastmilk and prevents it from being absorbed.  NEVER should a BF baby take multivitamins..it ruins the virgin gut and nutrient absorbtion.  I HATE that moms are lied to about this!!!!

AGAIN not true, theres LESS iron in breastmilk because its more readily aborbed, BF babies are not lacking in iron, in fact its MORE common for a FF baby to be anemic than a BF baby.

Well they lied to you, a baby can get enough vit D from the sun if you go outside 90 min a week, and there ARE Vit D only drops that do not interfer with nutrient absorbtion and ruin the virgin gut!

Quoting jmercado823:

My son also went through the same thing. Wic kept telling me he was low in iron. I continued to breastfeed him and make sure I fed him foods rich in iron. I gave him lots of spinach hidden in his foods and pureed meats since he hated the texture of it. I also gave DS trivisol w/ iron by Enfamil which is a vitamin for breastfed infants and infants who consume less than 18 oz of formula a day. Afterward, I switched to polyvisol which is for older babies and toddlers who are consuming solids. With the vitamins I was sure baby was getting vitamin D and iron he may have been lacking. After 6 months a breastfed baby needs to eat solids that are rich in iron because the iron in the breast milk is not enough for babies. My lactation consultant and pediatrician both told me that breastfed babies need to get vitamin supplements to ensure that they get their vitamin D. If your doc told you she is fine then don't worry about it. What you could do at this point is of course keep breastfeeding and make sure you incorporate iron-rich foods into her diet as well. Spinach, legumes, meat (lean red meat especially), dark leafy greens, eggs. If she likes cereals look for ones that have 100% iron on the nutrition facts list on the side of the box. Cheerios multi-grain cereal has 100% iron. I've even told the WIC they should allow this cereal since it has 100% iron also the banana nut crunch cereal by post.  When you give her foods high in iron wait at least an hour after before you give her dairy foods or foods high in calcium since calcium can inhibit the absorption of iron in the body. Wait an hour after giving her calcium rich foods before giving her iron rich foods. If you recall on the labels of iron rich prenatals they tell you not to drink the vitamin with milk. When you do give her iron rich foods follow it with foods rich in vitamin C to aid in the absorption of the iron. Keep up the good work mama. No worries!

I'm sorry but misinformation drives me BATTY, yes its true about the dairy and iron and about taking iron with Vit C thats true but everything else is very very misleading and not based on research and fact.

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