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HELP! new!

Posted by on Jun. 4, 2011 at 11:28 PM
  • 5 Replies

Hi ladies, I gave birth to my son yesterday 6/3/2011 @ 11:54am he latched on immeadiately after birth and has been a good little nurser since, lots of pee and tons of poop dipes. UNTIL we got home today at 3pm, he will not get off the boobs! He attacks it like hes starving and nurses for hours at a time until he falls asleep on the breast, the second i try to move him he screams and i put him back on and he eats like hes starved all over again. hes had 1 pee dipe since we have been home. hes really fussy, i havent slept and im really concerned! he just cries and cries unless hes on the boob. does anyone know whats wrong? or what i can do? i am so desperate i tried giving him a pacifier but he will not take it =( please help us!!!! thanks....

by on Jun. 4, 2011 at 11:28 PM
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Replies (1-5):
mostlymaydays
by Group Admin - Stacy on Jun. 4, 2011 at 11:36 PM
Newborns are programmed to nurse like crazy bc that is what stimulates your milk production. I suggest figuring out how to nurse w the baby in a sling, and nursing while laying in bed will let you nap while the baby nurses.
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maggiemom2000
by on Jun. 4, 2011 at 11:38 PM

You are doing the right thing by letting him stay on the breast. This is exactly what need to be happening right now. Lay back in a reclined position so that you can rest as much as you can, even if you can just catch some little cat naps with him on your chest. (In your bed, not a couch or recliner because that is not safe).

If you are worried about him getting enough you can try some hand expression and spoon feeding as shown in this video:

http://newborns.stanford.edu/Breastfeeding/HandExpression.html

Here is some info on laid back breastfeeding:

Early breastfeeding is easier when mothers lean back with their babies’ weight resting on their body.1  These laid-back positions not only make breastfeeding less work for mothers, they also make it easier for babies to take the breast deeply, especially during the early weeks.  That’s because in these positions gravity helps rather than hinders babies’ inborn feeding reflexes, which can make a huge difference when babies are at their most uncoordinated.

When mothers used what Colson calls laid-back breastfeeding (mothers leaning back with all body parts well supported and their babies lying tummy down on their semireclined bodies), the dynamics were very different. Gravity kept their babies’ bodies securely against theirs so no gaps could form and feeding triggers were continuous rather than interrupted. There were far fewer breastfeeding struggles, and the mothers perceived breastfeeding more positively. One reason may be that in laid-back positions, mothers were freed from supporting their babies’ weight with their arms. One of these mothers said, “Breastfeeding is so easy. I wish more of my friends were doing it.”

Colson concluded that human babies, like hamsters and puppies, feed best on their tummies.  From a practical standpoint, breastfeeding in laid-back positions is a lot less work. Thanks to gravity, baby’s chin, torso, legs, and feet automatically stay in contact with mother’s body and mother’s body supports baby’s weight throughout the feeding.

Especially during the early weeks, using laid-back positions reduces the steps mothers need to remember about getting their baby latched on deeply.  Good breastfeeding dynamics occur almost automatically, allowing mothers to focus on their baby instead of what they need to do next.  With gravity helping instead of hindering breastfeeding, the same reflexes (such arm cycling) that can get in the way in other positions actually make it easier for baby to get to the breast and attach deeply. Having at least one hand free also makes it easier for mothers to help their newborn or just to stroke and enjoy her. If desired, variations of laid-back breastfeeding can also be used when mother and baby are out and about.  Mothers can just scoot their hips forward in their chair and lean back.

For more information, see Colson’s website at www.biologicalnurturing.com

monichella71787
by on Jun. 4, 2011 at 11:39 PM
Nothing is wrong. Keep doing what your doing. The first few weeks are pretty hard. After that it gets easier. Congrats!! And yes! It is a lot easier on you and baby to breastfeed while laying down. :-)
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DragonRiderMD
by on Jun. 4, 2011 at 11:47 PM
Cluster feeding. One of the (perfectly normal) things they don't tell you about beforehand. :)

It gets better. You just have to ride it out. My daughter nursed literally all night every night when she was first born, until she was 10 days old. On the 10th night, she decided to sleep for 5 hours, and that became the norm.
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LaylasMaMa06
by on Jun. 5, 2011 at 12:38 AM

thanks ladies! i will just keep nursing hope my boobs dont fall off =)

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