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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

Latching on then pulling off, crying??

Posted by on Oct. 11, 2011 at 2:51 PM
  • 15 Replies
My one-month old goes through fussy periods where he acts hungry, latches on, then a few second later pulls off and cries, acting very fussy and upset. We'll repeat this numerous times until he eventually gives up and cries himself to sleep. What is going on? In between latches, I try burping him, rocking him, switching his position to help him feel more comfortable, diaper change, etc, etc, you name it. Why does he root and act hungry but get fussy and pull off when he latches on? He is currently on reflux medication and I also give him infant gas drops. I feel like I'm trying everything ladies!! Anyone have any ideas??
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by on Oct. 11, 2011 at 2:51 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Mom71307
by on Oct. 11, 2011 at 2:56 PM

Growth spurt, fast flow, impatient for letdown... tired but not truly hungry... (my son did the latter often and daddy could put him out but I couldn't without a fight) and it was about that age too!

kitty8199
by on Oct. 11, 2011 at 2:57 PM

 Maddie did that if she got too hungry.  I tried to feed her before she acted hungry.  She ate on schedule pretty much.  If she wasn't over tired or hungry she didn't do that.

Poisongirl98
by Bronze Member on Oct. 11, 2011 at 3:00 PM
Quoting Mom71307:

Growth spurt, fast flow, impatient for letdown... tired but not truly hungry... (my son did the latter often and daddy could put him out but I couldn't without a fight) and it was about that age too!




Yep, minus the 2nd one (unless she just wants to comfort nurse) this is what my 3-month old DD has been doing. It's definitely a lot worse if she's over tired.
FLmommy0204
by on Oct. 11, 2011 at 3:06 PM
1 mom liked this

Could be a growth spurt.  All the fussy on/off action will help your supply.  Could you also have overactive let down?  That can show up as reflux and gassiness.  Check kellymom for symptoms to see if that may be a problem.  

Randomtrixie
by on Oct. 11, 2011 at 3:08 PM
DS used to do that when he had to poop.
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ashleigheg
by on Oct. 11, 2011 at 3:14 PM
My daughter did that a lot around that age. She hadn't quite figured out the non-nutritive suckling yet, and was getting mad that she kept getting milk. I ended up finally giving in an giving her a binky during those times.
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Elyssa414
by on Oct. 11, 2011 at 3:28 PM
My son is 4 weeks old today and has been doing the same thing! I think I may have the overactive letdown thing! Glad I'm not alone, wish I could offer some advise! *hugs*
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SweetPeaDarlin
by on Oct. 11, 2011 at 5:00 PM

I am having this same problem w my 3 week old but my dd has been on the bottle (of expressed breastmilk) because of being in the nicu after birth. I think I may have a fast flow. The first couple of minutes when I pump is when I get most of my milk (like 30-40 mls) then it kind of trails off. So I think our prob might be either the nipple preference or fast flow. She also roots around and acts like she is super hungry but will latch and pull off and repeat a few times.

 

bopanddomsmom
by on Oct. 11, 2011 at 5:04 PM
ds did that when he had thrush
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aehanrahan
by Group Mod - Amy on Oct. 11, 2011 at 6:41 PM

http://www.kellymom.com/bf/concerns/baby/fussy-while-nursing.html

My baby fusses or cries during nursing - what's the problem?

By Kelly Bonyata, BS, IBCLC

 

Some babies will fuss, cry or pull off the breast during nursing. There are a number of reasons why this might be happening. It's pretty common to see this type of behavior at around 6-8 weeks, though it can occur at any time. If your baby is generally fussy (not just when nursing) see My baby is fussy! Is something wrong?

Determining the problem

Here are some of the problem-solving steps I go through when my baby is fussy at the breast or a mother asks me why her baby is fussing during nursing:

How old is baby? Most babies go through growth spurts during the first few days at home and around 7-10 days, 2-3 weeks, 4-6 weeks, 3 months, 4 months, 6 months, 9 months, etc. Many babies are fussy during growth spurts.

Is baby working on anything new developmentally? Babies who are starting to notice the world around them can be notoriously distractible. Any kind of new developmental step that baby is working on can affect nursing temporarily, whether it be fussy nursing behavior or simply more frequent nursing.

When is baby fussing? To figure out the cause it's helpful to pay attention to when the fussy behavior happens, both during the nursing session and during the day.

If baby is fussy right when your milk is letting down (or immediately after), there's a good chance that the fussy nursing is related to a fast let-down. If baby is fussy before let-down, or a few minutes into nursing (and a while after let-down), then baby may be impatient for the fast flow of milk that comes with let-down. Fussing at the end of a nursing session (or what seems to be the end) may mean that baby needs to burp, or is ready to finish nursing, or just wants to suck (and doesn't want to deal with a new let-down at this point), or wants to continue nursing on the other side or with a faster flow of milk.

If the fussy behavior is mainly in the mornings, it might be due to a faster than usual let-down if baby has just had a longer sleep period and mom's breasts are fuller than usual. If baby is fussier during evening nursings, it may be due to the normal fussy time that most babies have during the evening. Although most babies don't react to foods that mom eats, some do. If you eat a particular food at about the same time each day (or most days) and baby has a regular time where she fusses during nursing, try not eating that food for a week or two to see if things improve.

Does fussing occur on both sides equally or only on one side? Most moms have a faster let-down and/or a more abundant milk supply on one side than the other, so if your baby fusses more on one side, it may be due to these differences

What else is going on with baby? Is she sick or teething? Is something new or different going on in her environment? Has she started solids or is she trying a new food? Is she exhibiting other symptoms besides the fussy nursing?

Below are discussions of some of the different things that can lead to fussy nursing behavior. Keep in mind that the problem may also be a combination of several things.

Does baby need to burp?

Many babies will cry, fuss, pull off the breast, etc. if they need to burp. Try to burp between breasts and after a feeding, but don't worry if baby does not burp and is content. Breastfed babies overall don't take in as much air during a feeding as bottle-fed babies do, so usually don't need to burp as often. If baby has been crying before she nurses, or is so hungry that she nurses "frantically" or if mom has a fast let-down, baby could be taking in more air and may need to be burped more often.

Burping is usually only necessary during the first few months, though it may extend longer. Once your baby is moving more freely, she will be able to relieve the gastric gas herself. This usually will occur between the 4th and 6th month, but may be shorter in some children and longer in others.

If baby has a hard time burping, try burping more often during a feeding. The best burping position is one that applies firm pressure to the baby's tummy. Placing baby over the shoulderway up so that there is pressure on baby's abdomen often works well. Walking around while doing this might distract her long enough to get a good burp. You may even want to lie baby down on her stomach and burp her that way. 

Growth spurt

Babies often pull off and fuss during growth spurts. Most babies go through growth spurts, sometimes called frequency days, during the first few days at home and around 7-10 days, 2-3 weeks, 4-6 weeks, 3 months, 4 months, 6 months and 9 months (more or less). Moregrowth spurt information in this link.

Distractible baby

If baby seems to be pulling off the breast at any distraction (real or imaginary), then see The Distractible Baby.

Forceful let-down

Some babies will pull off the breast soon after let-down if mom has a forceful let-down. Baby may be frustrated by the too-fast flow of milk with let-down. A too-forceful let-down can also cause excessive gas or spitting up/vomiting. There is more information here on symptoms of and how to deal with a fast let-down reflex.

Slow let-down

Some babies get very impatient if mom has a slow let-down. There is more information here on speeding up a slow let-down reflex.

Baby wants a faster milk flow

Even very young babies can be quick to notice that pulling off, kneading the breast, etc. can cause an additional let-down, and can facilitate a faster, easier milk flow. Some babies become impatient with the slower milk flow following the initial fast flow at let-down. This may or may not be related to a slow let-down.

When a feeding begins at the breast there are drops of milk. Then when the initial let-down occurs (several seconds to a minute into the feeding), the milk flow speeds up quite a bit. At that time it may drip very quickly, squirt, or even spray. Some minutes later it slows again and the baby must continue to suck vigorously in order to elicit further let-downs. This pattern can continue through successive, multiple let-downs as long as the baby is continuing to nurse vigorously. Eventually, baby will learn that the flow will pick back up again if she'll only continue to vigorously suck/swallow.

With bottle feeding, the flow is instant and continuous. The baby is required to work very little. Once a baby has had a bottle, especially a lot of bottles, she may begin to prefer the ease of bottle-feeding over the work of breastfeeding. She may become frustrated at the breast after the first let-down occurs and the flow of milk begins to slow.

If baby is getting bottles you might consider putting them away, at least for a while. When you must use a bottle, only use a newborn nipple for as long as baby will tolerate it so that she never gets a really fast flow of milk from the bottle, but has to work a little more to get the milk.

Sometimes babies of moms with oversupply or fast let-down will also get very used to the fast flow and object when it normally slows somewhere between 3 weeks to 3 months.

It can be helpful to do some breast compression when this fussiness starts or right before you expect it to. This will help speed up the milk flow again. Once compression stops helping, try switching baby to the other side when she begins to fuss and back and forth again (after using compression) as you need to.

Baby is done nursing for the moment

If baby is fussing after she's been nursing for a while, and you've ruled out other causes, she may be in the process of changing her nursing pattern. Babies become very efficient at the breast with growth and maturity. They can milk the breast in a lot less time per feeding session than they required before. Baby's frustration may just be a sign that she's finished and wants to move on.

On a similar note, an occasional baby will just want to suck at the end of a nursing session and the flow of milk with let-down frustrates her. You might see if offering her a finger orpacifier (if baby is older than 4-6 weeks) to suck on during these times seems to help.

Baby prefers one side

Sometimes babies will refuse or fuss at a breast when the let-down is slower or too forceful, or the supply a bit lower. They in turn will prefer the side which lets down more/less quickly and in which the supply is more bountiful. See also: Lopsided! What can I do?

Fussy in the evening

Many young babies tend to pull off and fuss at the breast in the evening. See the articleCluster Feeding and Fussy Evenings.

Teething

Teething can cause fussy nursing behavior, as some babies experience gum discomfort with sucking. Baby might start to nurse, but then pull off and cry or fuss and not want to nurse anymore. See Teething for more information and tips.

Thrush

Frequent pulling off the breast can be a symptom of thrush.

Stuffy nose

A stuffy nose can cause fussy nursing behavior. If your baby has a stuffy nose and is having a hard time breathing and nursing at the same time, see colds & congestion.

Allergy or food sensitivity

Some babies with allergies or food sensitivities exhibit fussy nursing behavior. Often when there is a sensitivity to something in mom's diet, baby will come to the breast hungry but when she tastes/smells something in the milk that will cause her GI distress, she pulls off, bats her head back and forth, etc. Sensitivities to foods in mom's diet are rare. If this is the problem, you will most likely notice other symptoms, such as excessive spitting up or vomiting, colic, diarrhea, rash, persistent congestion or runny nose, or excessive gas. More information on food sensitivities in babies and links to more allergy information can be found in my articleDairy and other Food Sensitivities in Breastfed Babies.


Low milk supply

Low milk supply can cause baby to be fussy at the breast. If you feel that your milk supply may be low, see this page for more info: Increasing low milk supply.

Reflux

Reflux can result in baby being fussy at the breast. See Reflux and Breastfeeding for more information.

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